Only the ‘Best’

 

In 2016, Donald Trump promised to “only hire the best people.” By 2018, he was openly trashing most of them. What Trump demands is absolute personal loyalty. Not to the office, not to the country, but to him.

When Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds endorsed fellow governor Ron DeSantis, Trump issued a statement that said, “Two extremely disloyal people getting together is, however, a very beautiful thing to watch.” Kneel before Zod, peasants.

In the past two weeks, three high-profile individuals associated with the Trump campaign have engaged in various levels of bad behavior that has been met with absolute silence.

First, Laura Loomer, the self-styled “investigative journalist” whom Don Jr. has been promoting as his father’s next press secretary, doxxed Riley Gaines for endorsing DeSantis. Gaines appeared at a DeSantis event and was compensated for her travel and expenses and that was reported to the FEC. Loomer, who sticks her head up Trump’s rear for free, tried to paint this as a scandal and published Gaines’ home address on X (formerly Twitter), exposing her to Antifa and the rest of the transgender crazies.

Then last week, convicted felon and still Trump advisor, Roger Stone called Casey DeSantis the “C” word. Not illegal, of course, but crude and an indication of the contempt Trump & Co. have for women. That she is a loyal wife, a mother of young children, and a cancer survivor is just icing on that crap cake.

Last night, it was reported that Ryan Fournier, a co-founder of Students for Trump, was arrested for pistol-whipping his girlfriend. I guess we should be grateful that he didn’t use the business end of that gun on her.

We could hope that the other co-founder of Students for Trump will take up the slack. Oh, wait. That guy was John Lambert, and back in 2021, he was sentenced to 13 months in prison for fraud, pretending to be a New York City attorney and bilking people out of thousands of dollars. He’s still working out his supervised release and may not be available.

Only the best people. And as long as you bend the knee you’re A-Okay.

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  1. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    Lastly, isn’t it childish for Trump to denounce these few governors and others who have endorsed another candidate? He’s just a joke.

    I’ve known a few politicians in my lifetime. In private, they sound a lot like Trump. “I endorsed that guy. Do you believe what he just said?” “I did thus-and-such for so-and-so, and he never thanked me.”

    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    The game of politics is about building coalitions. That is the job that every politician is doing from the moment he or she decides to run. Endorsements are a very big deal in the world of politics. They are the currency of politics.

    Trump is saying publicly what I’ve heard many politicians say privately about other candidates or fellow elected representatives.

     

    • #61
  2. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right. 

    • #62
  3. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public.  What good would it do? 

    • #63
  4. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right.

    Ask him a question about the nuclear triad and you become the worst radio show host ever.

    • #64
  5. Steve Fast Member
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    You think this is scary? Wait until Trump tries to find people to work in his administration.

    Doxxing a fellow conservative will qualify Laura Loomer to be AG. Roger Stone’s history of dirty tricks makes him perfect for CIA director. Pistol-whipping a woman is the type of use of force that could make Ryan Fournier a great SecDef.

    • #65
  6. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):
    They don’t all do it to the extreme that Trump does. Reagan put up with a lot of crap from his people. He didn’t go badmouthing all the people who didn’t want him to give his Evil Empire speech, for example.

    Did those people go public with it at the time? Did they badmouth Reagan for it at the time?

    Did they undermine his agenda? Did they lie to his face? Both Birx and the military have admitted to that … rather, bragged about it 

    • #66
  7. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public. What good would it do?

    I agree. I’ve never heard any politician talk about loyalty publicly. 

    But I have heard quite a few sound like Trump in private conversations. 

    What I’m trying to say is that he’s not crazy for reacting that way. It’s pretty normal for politicians to do so. 

    • #67
  8. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    EJHill (View Comment):

    Django: It may be all there is to admire about Trump on a personal level, but I admire that strength and determination. His motivations may not be as pure as the driven, but I don’t give a damn.

    Character trait or megalomania? (Pathological egotist)

    I too bought a psychology degree online. 

    • #68
  9. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    If it were just Trump complaining about disloyalty and no one paid attention, who cares?  But a fair number of his supporters also look at it through Trump’s lens.  Going all the way back to the first Republican presidential primary debate in 2015, I remember seeing someone on Ricochet call Megyn Kelly a traitor or some similar term for asking Trump hard questions. 

    One person. That is less than a ‘fair number of his supporters’. 

    Also, let’s say a fair number of his supporters do complain about disloyalty. 

    What would that mean to you? 

    • #69
  10. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Trump is saying publicly what I’ve heard many politicians say privately about other candidates or fellow elected representatives.

    We know that people like McCain was pretty rough on subordinates and said some nasty things. 

    To this point, I think the argument should be is Trump wise to say these things publicly. I don’t tend to think so, even though part of me likes to hear it. 

     

    • #70
  11. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    TBA (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    If it were just Trump complaining about disloyalty and no one paid attention, who cares? But a fair number of his supporters also look at it through Trump’s lens. Going all the way back to the first Republican presidential primary debate in 2015, I remember seeing someone on Ricochet call Megyn Kelly a traitor or some similar term for asking Trump hard questions.

    One person. That is less than a ‘fair number of his supporters’.

    Also, let’s say a fair number of his supporters do complain about disloyalty.

    What would that mean to you?

    Yes and besides I recall the criticism of Kelly was not that the questions were “hard” as she herself likes to characterize them,  but that the questions were more of a hit job.

    • #71
  12. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    MarciN (View Comment):
    You don’t spy on your boss (Pence’s taking notes during private phone conversations with Trump, notes so he use them later–why else would he have been writing them down) or pretend to be supportive when you are not.

    1:  The President is not the Vice Presidents “boss”.  They are separate Constitutional offices.  POTUS cannot “fire” VPOTUS.

    2:  Lots of people take notes during phone calls.  For higher level government officials it’s kind of expected.

     

    • #72
  13. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    I remember when Omarosa claimed that Trump used the “n” word and she had it on tape, and immediately the Trump haters on Ricochet demanded that Trump’s supporters must all denounce him.

    Of course, the tape never surfaced, and it’s clear Omarosa made it all up. But the righteous fury of the Trump haters who clung to the lie never abated. One was still required to denounce him for something he didn’t actually do.

    Kind of like when Trump keeps claiming he’s going to drop incontrovertible proof of electoral fraud in 2020, but somehow never does.

    Of course, it never surfaces, and it’s clear [Trump] made it all up.  But the Righteous fury of the Trump supporters who cling to the lie never abated.

     

    • #73
  14. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Percival (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right.

    Ask him a question about the nuclear triad and you become the worst radio show host ever.

    Here too I recall it differently. I recall that anyone who never heard of the term nuclear triad was supposedly manifestly unfit, as if they probably didn’t already understand that the US possessed several delivery methods for its nukes but just had never come across the term, as if it it were some complex subject that couldn’t be understood in less than a minute. 

    It was the over the top and seemingly dishonest reaction that earned Hewitt the criticism.

    • #74
  15. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public. What good would it do?

    I agree. I’ve never heard any politician talk about loyalty publicly.

    But I have heard quite a few sound like Trump in private conversations.

    What I’m trying to say is that he’s not crazy for reacting that way. It’s pretty normal for politicians to do so.

    And you don’t see the difference between “Public” and “Private”?

     

    • #75
  16. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public. What good would it do?

    I agree. I’ve never heard any politician talk about loyalty publicly.

    But I have heard quite a few sound like Trump in private conversations.

    What I’m trying to say is that he’s not crazy for reacting that way. It’s pretty normal for politicians to do so.

    And you don’t see the difference between “Public” and “Private”?

     

    Why do you care if it’s public or private if it’s the same reaction, if what he’s reacting to is public? As voters, shouldn’t we want all of it public? Haven’t we had enough of the glittering images, narratives, and propaganda?

    • #76
  17. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    I remember when Omarosa claimed that Trump used the “n” word and she had it on tape, and immediately the Trump haters on Ricochet demanded that Trump’s supporters must all denounce him.

    Of course, the tape never surfaced, and it’s clear Omarosa made it all up. But the righteous fury of the Trump haters who clung to the lie never abated. One was still required to denounce him for something he didn’t actually do.

    Kind of like when Trump keeps claiming he’s going to drop incontrovertible proof of electoral fraud in 2020, but somehow never does.

    Of course, it never surfaces, and it’s clear [Trump] made it all up. But the Righteous fury of the Trump supporters who cling to the lie never abated.

     

    You should really check in with St. Augustine.

    • #77
  18. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    TBA (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    If it were just Trump complaining about disloyalty and no one paid attention, who cares? But a fair number of his supporters also look at it through Trump’s lens. Going all the way back to the first Republican presidential primary debate in 2015, I remember seeing someone on Ricochet call Megyn Kelly a traitor or some similar term for asking Trump hard questions.

    One person. That is less than a ‘fair number of his supporters’.

    Also, let’s say a fair number of his supporters do complain about disloyalty.

    What would that mean to you?

    Like I pointed out before, a lot of people who were applauded when they entered the Trump administration are now regarded as back-stabbers or whatever by the Trump loyalists.  It’s going to be harder to fill top positions in the next Trump administration, knowing that even if you are popular with conservatives when you take the job, you may be despised when you leave, because that seems to be a pattern.  My guess is if you work in a DeSantis or Haley administration, you could disagree with your boss and not have your boss and his legions of fans ridicule you on social media with childish nicknames.

    • #78
  19. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public. What good would it do?

    I agree. I’ve never heard any politician talk about loyalty publicly.

    But I have heard quite a few sound like Trump in private conversations.

    What I’m trying to say is that he’s not crazy for reacting that way. It’s pretty normal for politicians to do so.

    And you don’t see the difference between “Public” and “Private”?

     

    I do see a difference, as I said. What I’m trying to say is that his reactions are very normal for politicians. 

    I’m trying to say that he’s not some kind of maniacal egotist who is weird for a politician. 

    Does he lack social skills? For sure. :) :) 

    • #79
  20. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right.

    Ask him a question about the nuclear triad and you become the worst radio show host ever.

    Here too I recall it differently. I recall that anyone who never heard of the term nuclear triad was supposedly manifestly unfit, as if they probably didn’t already understand that the US possessed several delivery methods for its nukes but just had never come across the term, as if it it were some complex subject that couldn’t be understood in less than a minute.

    It was the over the top and seemingly dishonest reaction that earned Hewitt the criticism.

    It was a simple question to anyone versed in the US military policy for any length of time over the previous half-century. Trump was running for Commander-in-Chief, not for alderman. He had  a lot of studying to do, and he hadn’t started yet.

    • #80
  21. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    Percival (View Comment):

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right.

    Ask him a question about the nuclear triad and you become the worst radio show host ever.

    Here too I recall it differently. I recall that anyone who never heard of the term nuclear triad was supposedly manifestly unfit, as if they probably didn’t already understand that the US possessed several delivery methods for its nukes but just had never come across the term, as if it it were some complex subject that couldn’t be understood in less than a minute.

    It was the over the top and seemingly dishonest reaction that earned Hewitt the criticism.

    It was a simple question to anyone versed in the US military policy for any length of time over the previous half-century. Trump was running for Commander-in-Chief, not for alderman. He had a lot of studying to do, and he hadn’t started yet.

    I knew what the Nuclear Triad was when I was in Junior High School.

    • #81
  22. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    TBA (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    If it were just Trump complaining about disloyalty and no one paid attention, who cares? But a fair number of his supporters also look at it through Trump’s lens. Going all the way back to the first Republican presidential primary debate in 2015, I remember seeing someone on Ricochet call Megyn Kelly a traitor or some similar term for asking Trump hard questions.

    One person. That is less than a ‘fair number of his supporters’.

    Also, let’s say a fair number of his supporters do complain about disloyalty.

    What would that mean to you?

    Like I pointed out before, a lot of people who were applauded when they entered the Trump administration are now regarded as back-stabbers or whatever by the Trump loyalists. It’s going to be harder to fill top positions in the next Trump administration, knowing that even if you are popular with conservatives when you take the job, you may be despised when you leave, because that seems to be a pattern. My guess is if you work in a DeSantis or Haley administration, you could disagree with your boss and not have your boss and his legions of fans ridicule you on social media with childish nicknames.

    I share that concern about how able he will be to attract top talent. And it would be a problem even if he were a perfect human being. For starters, any president who is known to be able to serve only one term would have that problem too. But there’s a trust issue there for people as well. I have no idea how this will turn out. 

    But truthfully, I was worried about that in 2016. Who would work for this guy? Actually, his cabinet turned out to be an excellent group of people. They did a fantastic job. 

    But please remember that Republican voters wanted an outsider. They were not interested in Jeb Bush (my first choice) or anyone else who was deemed an insider. We have to respect that. And what goes with that is a person who is not going to have a poker hand of people to pick from to fill his cabinet and advisory roles. 

    Republicans wanted a fresh pair of eyes in Washington. Given the national debt and the intrusiveness of the various federal agencies into local life, I think they were right to want that more than anything else. 

    Voters were ticked off in 2016. I keep repeating this, but they wanted and got a clean sweep. Republicans took the House, the Senate, several governorships, and several state legislatures. 

    I respect my fellow Republicans. And Trump turned out to be a good choice. 

    • #82
  23. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    James Lileks (View Comment):
    BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right. 

    Republicans could have, too. Except they decided before he’d even taken the oath of office that they weren’t going to work with him.

    Amazing, isn’t it? Republicans refusing to work with a President of their own party? You’d at least expect them to be loyal to their own President.

    • #83
  24. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MarciN (View Comment):
    But truthfully, I was worried about that in 2016. Who would work for this guy? Actually, his cabinet turned out to be an excellent group of people. They did a fantastic job. 

    Right now, who would choose to work for him knowing that anyone who does gets targeted by an unhinged DOJ together with crazed federal judges, an FBI that operates as the secret police of the Democratic Party, and all the other federal agencies lined up against him. Ask John Eastman what happens to you if you work for Trump.

     

    • #84
  25. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    I remember when Omarosa claimed that Trump used the “n” word and she had it on tape, and immediately the Trump haters on Ricochet demanded that Trump’s supporters must all denounce him.

    Of course, the tape never surfaced, and it’s clear Omarosa made it all up. But the righteous fury of the Trump haters who clung to the lie never abated. One was still required to denounce him for something he didn’t actually do.

    Kind of like when Trump keeps claiming he’s going to drop incontrovertible proof of electoral fraud in 2020, but somehow never does.

    Of course, it never surfaces, and it’s clear [Trump] made it all up. But the Righteous fury of the Trump supporters who cling to the lie never abated.

    Meanwhile, you firmly believe that Joe Biden legitimately got 81 milli — LOL, I can barely type that without laughing — 81 million votes? More votes than any Presidential candidate ever? Even Obama? All the while campaigning from his basement or speaking to crowds of 12?

     

    • #85
  26. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):
    Republicans could have, too. Except they decided before he’d even taken the oath of office that they weren’t going to work with him.

    And then he gets slammed for not having the best people. 

    The GOPe and Conservatism, Inc. did quite a lot to damage the Trump Presidency out of spite. They may tell themselves it was because he was “unfit” but is is clear to me it was childish, petty, petulance. The exact sort of thing they want to accuse Trump of. 

    • #86
  27. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Terence Smith (View Comment):

    To a point, guilt by association to some unknown rando is unfair and someone should not dinged for it. Seem fairer though when someone actively embraces that association. For example when Trump actively touts an endorsement by a BLM activist Mark Fisher and also claims support by BLM, reinforces in my mind that Trump is way too opportunistic and transactional (unprincipled).

    It’s not surprising – it’s been the case all along. Give him admiration and you’re solid. Confront him outside his range of expertise and knowledge and it’s personal, and you’re a loser and hater. BLM could’ve had him over a barrel in 2020 if they’d played him right.

    Ask him a question about the nuclear triad and you become the worst radio show host ever.

    Here too I recall it differently. I recall that anyone who never heard of the term nuclear triad was supposedly manifestly unfit, as if they probably didn’t already understand that the US possessed several delivery methods for its nukes but just had never come across the term, as if it it were some complex subject that couldn’t be understood in less than a minute.

    It was the over the top and seemingly dishonest reaction that earned Hewitt the criticism.

    It was a simple question to anyone versed in the US military policy for any length of time over the previous half-century. Trump was running for Commander-in-Chief, not for alderman. He had a lot of studying to do, and he hadn’t started yet.

    I knew what the Nuclear Triad was when I was in Junior High School.

    I only ever heard of it when it was asked of Trump in 2015. It’s jargon for a concept most of us already knew anyway (or could describe upon a moment’s reflection). I suspect we actually have more than three by this point.

    • #87
  28. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN
    • #88
  29. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Annefy: Did they undermine his agenda? Did they lie to his face? Both Birx and the military have admitted to that … rather, bragged about it

    We’re getting closer here. The loyalty is not to the president but to the chain of command. Insubordination in the military is not following a lawful order. But insubordination is not disloyalty. If anyone in government cannot execute the policies of the president then they should just resign. 

    • #89
  30. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    MarciN (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    I don’t know any politicians who have ever said, “Gosh, I endorsed you for office, but I won’t mind it when you speak against me or run against me tomorrow. It’s okay. I understand. I’m a jerk. I deserve your poor opinion.” :)

    No, they don’t say that. They keep their mouths shut about it, because it comes off as childish and is self-demeaning to complain about it in public. What good would it do?

    I agree. I’ve never heard any politician talk about loyalty publicly.

    But I have heard quite a few sound like Trump in private conversations.

    What I’m trying to say is that he’s not crazy for reacting that way. It’s pretty normal for politicians to do so.

    And you don’t see the difference between “Public” and “Private”?

     

    I do see a difference, as I said. What I’m trying to say is that his reactions are very normal for politicians.

    I’m trying to say that he’s not some kind of maniacal egotist who is weird for a politician.

    Does he lack social skills? For sure. :) :)

    Social skills according to whom? To me, I like direct and dislike veiled, in personal life. In public life, as a voter I now believe direct is a benefit to me – the more direct the better since I’ve had more than my fill of of duplicity and platitude.

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