Can You Overdose on Nostalgia?

 

Probably, but I am going to try anyway. I have started a new project.

I tried to make a list of the albums that I have listened to the most. I am up to about 50 albums so far, and almost all of them are from late adolescence and young adulthood. This means these are old albums I haven’t listened to in a long time. I listen to one of them every day while I am walking for exercise.

For a small monthly fee, I can listen to every album I have ever heard! The internet is an amazing thing. I have only done this three days so far, but it has brought back memories that might have been lost forever if I had not done that.

Of course, I never know if those memories are real.

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  1. MWD B612 "Dawg" Inactive
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Wonderful idea, SP! I may have to do the same.

    • #1
  2. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    Southern Pessimist: Of course, I never know if those memories are real.

    The Matrix has you.

    • #2
  3. namlliT noD Member
    namlliT noD
    @DonTillman

    Heh-heh…I do something similar, but opposite.  I try to listen to all the albums I never got a chance to listen to.

    I was in my formative high school years in the early 70’s where there was so much amazing music being released that, even though I had a sizable record collection and a couple wonderful radio stations on tap, I simply couldn’t keep up with even a tiny fraction of the music.  And I’ve always been wondering, what does *that* album sound like.

    So every dog walk is an opportunity.

    And this applies to classical and jazz also.

    Recently: Henry Cow, Keith Jarret, Ralph Vaughn Williams, Tony Williams, Godspell, The Grass Roots, John McLaughlin, Telemann, Paul Williams, Jack Bruce, West Bruce & Laing,…

    And podcasts, too.  

    Dog walks are just wonderful in the 21st century.

    • #3
  4. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    Heh-heh…I do something similar, but opposite. I try to listen to all the albums I never got a chance to listen to.

    I was in my formative high school years in the early 70’s where there was so much amazing music being released that, even though I had a sizable record collection and a couple wonderful radio stations on tap, I simply couldn’t keep up with even a tiny fraction of the music. And I’ve always been wondering, what does *that* album sound like.

    So every dog walk is an opportunity.

    And this applies to classical and jazz also.

    Recently: Henry Cow, Keith Jarret, Ralph Vaughn Williams, Tony Williams, Godspell, The Grass Roots, John McLaughlin, Telemann, Paul Williams, Jack Bruce, West Bruce & Laing,…

    And podcasts, too.

    Dog walks are just wonderful in the 21st century.

    Thank you, thank you. I had totally forgotten about Paul Williams and his amazingly soulful voice and bitter sweet lyrics.

    • #4
  5. namlliT noD Member
    namlliT noD
    @DonTillman

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    Thank you, thank you. I had totally forgotten about Paul Williams and his amazingly soulful voice and bitter sweet lyrics.

    And gorgeous melodies.  His album “Life Goes On” includes:

    • “Out in the Country” (for Three Dog Night)
    • “I Won’t Last a Day Without You” (for the Carpenters, this is the song with the chorus “When there’s no getting over that rainbow…”)
    • Traveling Boy (for Art Garfunkel)

     

    • #5
  6. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    Thank you, thank you. I had totally forgotten about Paul Williams and his amazingly soulful voice and bitter sweet lyrics.

    And gorgeous melodies. His album “Life Goes On” includes:

    • “Out in the Country” (for Three Dog Night)
    • “I Won’t Last a Day Without You” (for the Carpenters, this is the song with the chorus “When there’s no getting over that rainbow…”)
    • Traveling Boy (for Art Garfunkel)

     

    I think ” A little bit of love” is the album I played over and over and over. Good times and better memories.

    • #6
  7. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf 🚫 Banned
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    I am constantly overdosing on nostalgia. I hope it’s not fatal.

    Currently, I’m in a project to reread a bunch of books I remember reading and liking when I was in my teens and early 20s. Revisiting them in middle age makes for a much different experience, of course.

     

    • #7
  8. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    I am constantly overdosing on nostalgia. I hope it’s not fatal.

    Currently, I’m in a project to reread a bunch of books I remember reading and liking when I was in my teens and early 20s. Revisiting them in middle age makes for a much different experience, of course.

     

    I did that a few years ago and it was surprising how well most of them held up. That has not been true for movies however. I wonder why that is. 

    • #8
  9. Franco 🚫 Banned
    Franco
    @Franco

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain,  Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking 

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled 

    And  many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    • #9
  10. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    The few books in my life that I have read more than once seem to hold their magic over time. I am not sure if the music of my youth will hold up as well but I hope so. There are not many movies that I have watched repeatedly but I can’t think of any that I would watch if there was a ball game on at the same time.

    • #10
  11. MWD B612 "Dawg" Inactive
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Franco (View Comment):

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain, Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled

    And many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    I played sax years ago. About 7 years ago I rented one for a couple of months just to see if I remembered how to play. It all came back.

    One thing I didn’t realize when I was younger is just how physical it can be playing an instrument. The breath support, the weight of the instrument, circular breathing, etc. It took a toll at first.

    • #11
  12. Fritz Coolidge
    Fritz
    @Fritz

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain, Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled

    And many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    I played sax years ago. About 7 years ago I rented one for a couple of months just to see if I remembered how to play. It all came back.

    One thing I didn’t realize when I was younger is just how physical it can be playing an instrument. The breath support, the weight of the instrument, circular breathing, etc. It took a toll at first.

    I’m now in my 7th month of re-learning to play the trumpet after a layoff of 55+ years, and I heartily echo the sentiment about the physicality of playing.

    It well may be that in my 70s, I can never fully regain the chops I had when recording in the 60s, but I still like to play the horn. When I tire of doing the technical work, I pull out some charts of old favorites and have a bit of fun, even if I do fracture too many notes. If I ever get to be able to play the pieces from back then, it’ll be like time travel. Heh.

    • #12
  13. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain, Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled

    And many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    I played sax years ago. About 7 years ago I rented one for a couple of months just to see if I remembered how to play. It all came back.

    One thing I didn’t realize when I was younger is just how physical it can be playing an instrument. The breath support, the weight of the instrument, circular breathing, etc. It took a toll at first.

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids.  His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    • #13
  14. MWD B612 "Dawg" Inactive
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain, Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled

    And many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    I played sax years ago. About 7 years ago I rented one for a couple of months just to see if I remembered how to play. It all came back.

    One thing I didn’t realize when I was younger is just how physical it can be playing an instrument. The breath support, the weight of the instrument, circular breathing, etc. It took a toll at first.

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Heh. I also played recorder in a Baroque ensemble.

    What does your son teach if you don’t mind me asking? Both my kids went to Chapel Hill.

    • #14
  15. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf 🚫 Banned
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Youngest daughter (18) recently invited a whole drum kit into the house.

    Together with the three guitars and the piano, we could start a band!

    • #15
  16. MWD B612 "Dawg" Inactive
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Youngest daughter (18) recently invited a whole drum kit into the house.

    Together with the three guitars and the piano, we could start a band!

    Need a bass player, Drew.

    • #16
  17. AMD Texas Coolidge
    AMD Texas
    @DarinJohnson

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    Thank you, thank you. I had totally forgotten about Paul Williams and his amazingly soulful voice and bitter sweet lyrics.

    And gorgeous melodies. His album “Life Goes On” includes:

    • “Out in the Country” (for Three Dog Night)
    • “I Won’t Last a Day Without You” (for the Carpenters, this is the song with the chorus “When there’s no getting over that rainbow…”)
    • Traveling Boy (for Art Garfunkel)

    I think ” A little bit of love” is the album I played over and over and over. Good times and better memories.

    I picked up his Back to Love album a couple of decades ago. It was a compilation of greatest hits that he released or wrote. He wrote Rainbow Connection and sings it on that album. I adore it.

    • #17
  18. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment

    I picked up his Back to Love album a couple of decades ago. It was a compilation of greatest hits that he released or wrote. He wrote Rainbow Connection and sings it on that album. I adore it.

    I just cued up Rainbow Connection at my son’s suggestion, the cover done by Kermit the Frog. Good times, good times.

    • #18
  19. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Youngest daughter (18) recently invited a whole drum kit into the house.

    Together with the three guitars and the piano, we could start a band!

    Need a bass player, Drew.

    Stand-up. Don’t let an electric bass player anywhere near your daughters, Drew.  They range from sketchy to depraved.

    • #19
  20. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    I tried to make a list of the albums that I have listened to the most.

    This is the one I’ve probably listened to the most in the last 50+ years. Heard it first in 1970 or so at the student union “listening room” (on 5-foot speakers) and still have it on LP, ITunes, CD, etc.

    Eric Clapton's Guitars and Gear

    • #20
  21. DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf 🚫 Banned
    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Youngest daughter (18) recently invited a whole drum kit into the house.

    Together with the three guitars and the piano, we could start a band!

    Need a bass player, Drew.

    Oh, she’s working on that, too.

    EDIT: I should say, she’s working on learning that, not recruiting that.

    • #21
  22. MWD B612 "Dawg" Inactive
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Lower Order O… (View Comment):

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    My son who teaches at UNC in Chapel Hill lives in a dump but his living room includes a piano, an electric synthesizer, a drum kit, multiple acoustic and electric guitars, ukuleles, a saxophone, flutes and recorders that are played by all of his kids. His high school band teacher offered anyone in his class who could play a tune on his English horn his English horn. That sits in Scott’s house as well.

    Youngest daughter (18) recently invited a whole drum kit into the house.

    Together with the three guitars and the piano, we could start a band!

    Need a bass player, Drew.

    Oh, she’s working on that, too.

    EDIT: I should say, she’s working on learning that, not recruiting that.

    Good on her!

    • #22
  23. Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    I don’t know if this qualifies as nostalgia, or cultural inquiry, or dissatisfaction with modern entertainment (I don’t think I’ve gone to the movies since The Hangover II).  But I’ve recently watched a lot of TV shows from the 50s and early 60s, and now movies made between the 20s and the 50s.  And they’re really quite good (and no CGI, and the willing suspension of disbelief make the primitive special effects inconsequential in relation to the effect of the many other aspects of the story-telling — men in gorilla suits can still make you go, Oh, No!, at least a little — consider the two gorillas in Trading Places).

    But they’re eye-opening to see how people lived in days before my birth.  If movies represent the culture in ways that contemporaneous audiences didn’t perceive, cultural differences are rather clear from 50 to 100 years later.  They’re kind of subtle, but one thing I noticed was that men don’t so much stand aside and let women pass through doors that they open for them, they take them by the arm and physically push them through.  And people touch each other more in common conversation (though I don’t know if this is a theatrical convention, it sure is different from movies today).  And people don’t lock their doors.  And people carry their cigarettes in cigarette cases, and use wooden matches!

    That’s nostalgia for you.

    • #23
  24. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Globalitarian Lower Order Misa… (View Comment):

    I don’t know if this qualifies as nostalgia, or cultural inquiry, or dissatisfaction with modern entertainment (I don’t think I’ve gone to the movies since The Hangover II). But I’ve recently watched a lot of TV shows from the 50s and early 60s, and now movies made between the 20s and the 50s. And they’re really quite good (and no CGI, and the willing suspension of disbelief make the primitive special effects inconsequential in relation to the effect of the many other aspects of the story-telling — men in gorilla suits can still make you go, Oh, No!, at least a little — consider the two gorillas in Trading Places).

    But they’re eye-opening to see how people lived in days before my birth. If movies represent the culture in ways that contemporaneous audiences didn’t perceive, cultural differences are rather clear from 50 to 100 years later. They’re kind of subtle, but one thing I noticed was that men don’t so much stand aside and let women pass through doors that they open for them, they take them by the arm and physically push them through. And people touch each other more in common conversation (though I don’t know if this is a theatrical convention, it sure is different from movies today). And people don’t lock their doors. And people carry their cigarettes in cigarette cases, and use wooden matches!

    That’s nostalgia for you.

    There is a movie in which Humphrey Bogart is desperate to find a pay phone despite being in the middle of nowhere that absolutely wouldn’t work in the cell phone era.

    • #24
  25. Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    Percival (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Lower Order Misa… (View Comment):

    I don’t know if this qualifies as nostalgia, or cultural inquiry, or dissatisfaction with modern entertainment (I don’t think I’ve gone to the movies since The Hangover II). But I’ve recently watched a lot of TV shows from the 50s and early 60s, and now movies made between the 20s and the 50s. And they’re really quite good (and no CGI, and the willing suspension of disbelief make the primitive special effects inconsequential in relation to the effect of the many other aspects of the story-telling — men in gorilla suits can still make you go, Oh, No!, at least a little — consider the two gorillas in Trading Places).

    But they’re eye-opening to see how people lived in days before my birth. If movies represent the culture in ways that contemporaneous audiences didn’t perceive, cultural differences are rather clear from 50 to 100 years later. They’re kind of subtle, but one thing I noticed was that men don’t so much stand aside and let women pass through doors that they open for them, they take them by the arm and physically push them through. And people touch each other more in common conversation (though I don’t know if this is a theatrical convention, it sure is different from movies today). And people don’t lock their doors. And people carry their cigarettes in cigarette cases, and use wooden matches!

    That’s nostalgia for you.

    There is a movie in which Humphrey Bogart is desperate to find a pay phone despite being in the middle of nowhere that absolutely wouldn’t work in the cell phone era.

    That’s a lot worse than Superman not finding a phone booth.  Would that joke go over with today’s youth?

    • #25
  26. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Globalitarian Lower Order Misa… (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Lower Order Misa… (View Comment):

    I don’t know if this qualifies as nostalgia, or cultural inquiry, or dissatisfaction with modern entertainment (I don’t think I’ve gone to the movies since The Hangover II). But I’ve recently watched a lot of TV shows from the 50s and early 60s, and now movies made between the 20s and the 50s. And they’re really quite good (and no CGI, and the willing suspension of disbelief make the primitive special effects inconsequential in relation to the effect of the many other aspects of the story-telling — men in gorilla suits can still make you go, Oh, No!, at least a little — consider the two gorillas in Trading Places).

    But they’re eye-opening to see how people lived in days before my birth. If movies represent the culture in ways that contemporaneous audiences didn’t perceive, cultural differences are rather clear from 50 to 100 years later. They’re kind of subtle, but one thing I noticed was that men don’t so much stand aside and let women pass through doors that they open for them, they take them by the arm and physically push them through. And people touch each other more in common conversation (though I don’t know if this is a theatrical convention, it sure is different from movies today). And people don’t lock their doors. And people carry their cigarettes in cigarette cases, and use wooden matches!

    That’s nostalgia for you.

    There is a movie in which Humphrey Bogart is desperate to find a pay phone despite being in the middle of nowhere that absolutely wouldn’t work in the cell phone era.

    That’s a lot worse than Superman not finding a phone booth. Would that joke go over with today’s youth?

    In the original Christopher Reeves Superman, he finds a public phone, but booths were already a thing of the past. It got a laugh from the audience; all but the youngest knew when Clark Kent slowed down to look at the phone while pulling off his tie what he was thinking.

    • #26
  27. thelonious Member
    thelonious
    @thelonious

    Fritz (View Comment):

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    I took up fiddle about 35 years ago playing Irish tunes. It takes a while to get good…and then and I kept playing and now studying classical violin, playing jazz, blues and rock as well. As a youngster in the mid sixties I played guitar, was a pretty good blues player, but didn’t really apply myself and those years were chaotic.

    Now I’m learning and playing songs I listened to in my youth. I never, ever thought I would be, or could be doing anything like this.

    a few songs I’m learning:

    Statesboro Blues Duane’s slide guitar part

    Spain, Chick Corea

    Sax solo from Stones Can’t you hear me knocking

    Meletron solo from Genesis Entangled

    And many more.

    It’s a special kind of nostalgia.

    Music is well connected to memory and I still get images from the old days hearing these songs.

    If I hear a song from those days, but I haven’t heard it since it can be pretty powerful, calling up lost memories.

     

     

    I played sax years ago. About 7 years ago I rented one for a couple of months just to see if I remembered how to play. It all came back.

    One thing I didn’t realize when I was younger is just how physical it can be playing an instrument. The breath support, the weight of the instrument, circular breathing, etc. It took a toll at first.

    I’m now in my 7th month of re-learning to play the trumpet after a layoff of 55+ years, and I heartily echo the sentiment about the physicality of playing.

    It well may be that in my 70s, I can never fully regain the chops I had when recording in the 60s, but I still like to play the horn. When I tire of doing the technical work, I pull out some charts of old favorites and have a bit of fun, even if I do fracture too many notes. If I ever get to be able to play the pieces from back then, it’ll be like time travel. Heh.

    It’s funny you mention technical work.  I was mainly a trombone player in my early 20s. I had the discipline to sit in a practice room and play long tones for an hour.  Really helped with my tone and endurance.  Today, I think I’d quit within 5 minutes.  I now mainly play guitar and I know I  should spend a couple weeks just doing technical drills. I get bored too easily and want to work on stuff that interests me. I think besides physical limitations, I also am becoming limited in my ability to focus and getting less disciplined because of it. I admire you for doing the real work of trying to become a better player. 

    • #27
  28. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Nostalgia just ain’t what it used to be.

    • #28
  29. Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    Nostalgia?  You don’t know what nostalgia is.  When I was a child we had to build our own nostalgia out of Lincoln Logs.  Oh, those were the good old days.

    • #29
  30. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Cross-checked this with the Boatwife/Cultural Curator:

    Globalitarian Lower Order Misa… (View Comment):

    …but one thing I noticed was that men don’t so much stand aside and let women pass through doors that they open for them, they take them by the arm and physically push them through.

    Has affirmatively not been observed

    And people touch each other more in common conversation (though I don’t know if this is a theatrical convention, it sure is different from movies today).

    Has not been noticed

    And people don’t lock their doors.

    I didn’t inquire: neither of us would notice, since we don’t lock our doors. (We are however, always struck when we see the opposite: people locking their doors.)

    And people carry their cigarettes in cigarette cases, and use wooden matches!

    The cigarette cases yes. Wooden matches? No. Only nice cigarette lighters.

     * * *

    Conclusion:

    Need more studies to eliminate a possible confounding effect due to sampling biases. (It seems Kate may travel in a better class of movies than you.  Have you heard of a Cary Grant?)

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