Revisiting Concealed Carry

 

Due to the growing conflicts in our own country in recent years, I made the decision to not only own a gun but to qualify for concealed carry. My husband and I were practicing every two weeks at a nearby range and enjoying our time together. Then life got in the way.

My excuses mainly arose out of pain that I was experiencing in my hands and wrists—which you sorta, kinda, need to shoot a gun. I was desperate to find a way to deal with the pain, which I was experiencing in other places in my body—and then discovered recently the likely source of my pain: anastrazole. It was a drug prescribed by my oncologist and has a nasty side effect: body pain. He immediately discontinued my taking the drug and about a week ago, I realized that my pain had reduced significantly.

But what does that have to do with concealed carry, you might ask?

Although I am still having some arthritis pain in my fingers and wrists, it’s manageable; it helps to take medication just before we go to practice. And today, I had a discussion with my husband that convinced me I need to restart practicing and gaining more familiarity with using my gun.

You see, I mentioned to him that I had bought a lovely new necklace online that was due to arrive any day. Immediately, he asked me if I was planning to “carry” regularly. The necklace has a menorah charm, which I bought to honor my solidarity with Jews and Israel. My husband clarified that he had no problem with that, but he thought it was important for me to be . . . prepared. So, I carry in a purse designed to carry a gun. Many men have suggested carrying with a special holster but I simply don’t want to do that.

If you were hesitant about getting a gun, I’d ask you to reconsider. I don’t think it’s wise to go out in public without one anymore. I never thought I’d be this paranoid, but there you are.

Previously when I decided to carry a gun, it was a wise decision because I would never know when I might need it. But now, it seems like it’s a much bigger commitment.

Now, it might be a matter of life and death.

Published in Guns
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  1. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying. By state law, I can’t carry at my public defenders office, the courthouse, or the jail, which is basically everywhere I go. I could carry in the car, but why bother when the car itself is a weapon? 

    Don’t mess with Amy in the parking lot.

    • #31
  2. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Susan, I can relate! I was on anastrozole for a year after my cancer treatment, and it was miserable. It hurt to walk. At the time I was my late husband’s caregiver as his health was beginning to decline, and it made a difficult time much worse. It was tough going. Finally my oncologist said that if my pain was going to improve (sometimes it does) it would have done so by then, and so he put me on a different class of hormone reducer and life improved dramatically. I’m glad you had relief as well!

    I haven’t read all the comments so I don’t know if someone has already suggested this, but perhaps you could find someone who reloads their own ammunition (my husband was a reloader) and see if you can get lighter loads made up for your practice shooting. Maybe that’s not going to make enough of a difference (my husband was the expert on these things, not me) , but it’s what came to mind. Maybe someone here knows if this is a reasonable course to pursue.

    So you can truly relate!

    Reloading is not a problem; gripping the gun is painful after a while. But I got in a good practice today, and if I need to protect myself, I don’t anticipate a lot of shots. They don’t call me Annie Oakley for nuthin’!

    I should have explained: a reloader is someone who makes their own ammunition. What I was suggesting was seeing if you could have a reloader make you up some lighter rounds, that is, less “bang” (less gunpowder). I don’t know if it can be “lightened” enough to make a difference, but it’s what came to mind.

    • #32
  3. Globalitarian Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff.  Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    • #33
  4. kidCoder Member
    kidCoder
    @kidCoder

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff.  Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Yeah. I was just pointing out that our societal institutions that control evil rely on suppressing an individual’s freedom of expression and to control their own destiny. Kinda poetic, really.

    • #34
  5. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    I should have explained: a reloader is someone who makes their own ammunition. What I was suggesting was seeing if you could have a reloader make you up some lighter rounds, that is, less “bang” (less gunpowder). I don’t know if it can be “lightened” enough to make a difference, but it’s what came to mind.

    Oh, we have a friend here on Rico who was putting together reloads for us for practice, when ammo was so expensive. But as good a job as he did, my gun would have problems with them. I have a different gun now, but I’d rather stay with conventional ammo. It would be interesting to learn whether lighter rounds would make any difference.

    • #35
  6. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    I should have explained: a reloader is someone who makes their own ammunition. What I was suggesting was seeing if you could have a reloader make you up some lighter rounds, that is, less “bang” (less gunpowder). I don’t know if it can be “lightened” enough to make a difference, but it’s what came to mind.

    Oh, we have a friend here on Rico who was putting together reloads for us for practice, when ammo was so expensive. But as good a job as he did, my gun would have problems with them. I have a different gun now, but I’d rather stay with conventional ammo. It would be interesting to learn whether lighter rounds would make any difference.

    One thing I can relate from indirect experience, maybe not an issue with a handgun but my two younger brothers sometimes go to a shooting range together.  One of them has a .308 bolt-action, the other has a .308 semi-automatic.  They find that they can’t use all the same ammo in the semi-auto because it’s a pretty hefty rifle and apparently not all of the different types of .308 they use produce enough pressure to fully activate the mechanism.  Which isn’t a problem with the bolt-action.

    • #36
  7. Globalitarian Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Yeah. I was just pointing out that our societal institutions that control evil rely on suppressing an individual’s freedom of expression and to control their own destiny. Kinda poetic, really.

    That’s rather deep.  I’ll think about that.

    • #37
  8. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Susan, I can relate! I was on anastrozole for a year after my cancer treatment, and it was miserable. It hurt to walk. At the time I was my late husband’s caregiver as his health was beginning to decline, and it made a difficult time much worse. It was tough going. Finally my oncologist said that if my pain was going to improve (sometimes it does) it would have done so by then, and so he put me on a different class of hormone reducer and life improved dramatically. I’m glad you had relief as well!

    I haven’t read all the comments so I don’t know if someone has already suggested this, but perhaps you could find someone who reloads their own ammunition (my husband was a reloader) and see if you can get lighter loads made up for your practice shooting. Maybe that’s not going to make enough of a difference (my husband was the expert on these things, not me) , but it’s what came to mind. Maybe someone here knows if this is a reasonable course to pursue.

    So you can truly relate!

    Reloading is not a problem; gripping the gun is painful after a while. But I got in a good practice today, and if I need to protect myself, I don’t anticipate a lot of shots. They don’t call me Annie Oakley for nuthin’!

    I should have explained: a reloader is someone who makes their own ammunition. What I was suggesting was seeing if you could have a reloader make you up some lighter rounds, that is, less “bang” (less gunpowder). I don’t know if it can be “lightened” enough to make a difference, but it’s what came to mind.

    A lighter load could be dangerous with a semi-auto. They need a certain amount of blowback to eject the round and load the next. Otherwise you get jams.. For her, one of the girl guns is a better solution. I have arthritis and love my Smith and Wesson .380 ez.

    • #38
  9. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Red Herring (View Comment):
    A lighter load could be dangerous with a semi-auto. They need a certain amount of blowback to eject the round and load the next. Otherwise you get jams.. For her, one of the girl guns is a better solution. I have arthritis and love my Smith and Wesson .380 ez.

    That’s my gun! And I love it! It’s made a big difference.

    • #39
  10. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    JoelB (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    I feel naked without my hypothetical weapon . . .

    Hypothetical?

    I don’t want to confirm to whomever may be reading our comments (e.g. government) that I have a weapon.  Therefore, any mention of my owning weaponry is hypothetical . . .

    • #40
  11. Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker Coolidge
    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker
    @AmySchley

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    • #41
  12. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    Being fair to the guards for a minute (okay, 30 seconds), if they are guarding against that, it’s because someone has done it.

    • #42
  13. Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker Coolidge
    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker
    @AmySchley

    Percival (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    Being fair to the guards for a minute (okay, 30 seconds), if they are guarding against that, it’s because someone has done it.

    Yes, apparently someone was stamping “Legal Mail” on papers loaded with fentanyl. So I get why they would investigate anything being mailed into the jail. But it’s still irritating to be treated like I’m a vector for contraband. 

    • #43
  14. Globalitarian Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    Stad (View Comment):

    JoelB (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    I feel naked without my hypothetical weapon . . .

    Hypothetical?

    I don’t want to confirm to whomever may be reading our comments (e.g. government) that I have a weapon. Therefore, any mention of my owning weaponry is hypothetical . . .

    Get out.  You don’t have a gun.  You’re just pretending to have one to scare off the timid.

    • #44
  15. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    Being fair to the guards for a minute (okay, 30 seconds), if they are guarding against that, it’s because someone has done it.

    Yes, apparently someone was stamping “Legal Mail” on papers loaded with fentanyl. So I get why they would investigate anything being mailed into the jail. But it’s still irritating to be treated like I’m a vector for contraband.

    Would you rather they made an exception in some cases? 

    • #45
  16. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    Being fair to the guards for a minute (okay, 30 seconds), if they are guarding against that, it’s because someone has done it.

    Yes, apparently someone was stamping “Legal Mail” on papers loaded with fentanyl. So I get why they would investigate anything being mailed into the jail. But it’s still irritating to be treated like I’m a vector for contraband.

    Imagine if you wanted to give them a birthday cake . . .

    • #46
  17. Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker Coolidge
    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker
    @AmySchley

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    kidCoder (View Comment):

    Amy Schley, Longcat Shrinker (View Comment):
    Actually, this is the biggest issue I have with carrying.

    Those who are exposed to the most evil have the least chance to carry a weapon about their lives… since they can’t at work.

    But to be fair, prison officers bring completely contraband cell phones with chargers in for the prisoners, as well as money, drugs, and other stuff. Without a doubt, being allowed to carry handguns into locked areas would lead to prisoners having access to them as well.

    Heck, my main jail won’t let me bring my keys or my laptop bag, and half the guards won’t even let me hand papers to my clients; they insist that they have to make photocopies for my clients to receive just in case I’m lacing the legal mail with fentanyl. (Other local jails aren’t so paranoid.)

    Being fair to the guards for a minute (okay, 30 seconds), if they are guarding against that, it’s because someone has done it.

    Yes, apparently someone was stamping “Legal Mail” on papers loaded with fentanyl. So I get why they would investigate anything being mailed into the jail. But it’s still irritating to be treated like I’m a vector for contraband.

    Would you rather they made an exception in some cases?

    An exception for things handed to people in person? Yes. If they have reason to believe I’m a vector for smuggled drugs, fine. Let them search or photocopy my papers at that point. 

    I just resent the notion that I’m willing to lose my law license and the student loan forgiveness that comes with my job for my clients. I don’t like them *that* much. 

    • #47
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