Gad Saad Lays Out the Long View

 

Here’s Gad Saad saying the quiet part out loud.  The part that many of our friends here only see sometimes, or in glimpses.

I am a very optimistic person; I am a fighter for Western values and liberties; I am a dogged defender of science, reason, and common sense. I must say though that I am unsure that the West can recover from its multifront civilizational suicide. Yes, I’ve talked about these issues for decades and wrote a book about it but the past few weeks have crystallized the extent to which the problem has become intractable. It will be a long and ultimately bloody demise and the West will be the first society in recorded history to fully self-implode due to its parasitic ideological rapture. It is a gargantuan Greek tragedy that will shape the future of humanity. This is not hyperbole. Your grandchildren will pay a very high price for your “progressive” arrogance rooted in the pursuit of Unicornia that only exists in the recesses of deeply flawed parasitized minds. [emphasis added — bdb]

“Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.” — Winston Churchill


You know why the men of Western Civilization think about the Roman Empire so much?  Because the men of the Roman Empire are no longer here to do it.

Thousands of years from now, students will wonder how a people so relatively advanced for our primitive digital age times were conquered, displaced, wiped out, and our culture obliterated by vicious, illiterate, hand-to-mouth savages.  They won’t see the supposedly subtle gradations that seem like hair-splitting now.  They will see the clear, definitive results.

They will wonder at our thundering stupidity, but they will not be alarmed.  They will be grateful, for they are the descendants of the savages.  That’s why it will be thousands of years before they begin to wonder what happened to us.


From a post of mine several months ago

This year is the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Camp of the Saints by Jean Raspail.  There’s a pdf available here.  I confess that I have not read the thing in its entirety, despite pawing at it for the last ten years.  It seems enough to read the hoopla around it.  Get some of the feedback from both sides, and think to yourself, “yeah, but one of these sides keeps getting proven wrong…”

If you are unfamiliar with the work, it centers upon a fancifully large tidal wave of the world’s poorest commandeering a large number of beaten-down hulk ships and steaming toward the shores of France while the French government dithers, debates erupt into violence, and as the wave crashes, the lights go out in Europe.  How racist, right?  Except that it’s Raspail whose dramatization keeps being proven correct.  The fanciful part is just that it happens all at once!

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  1. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    the pursuit of Unicornia” 

    What a word. 

    • #1
  2. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    TBA (View Comment):

    the pursuit of Unicornia”

    What a word.

    In Unicornia the average Palestinian wants peace and Islam is just like any other religion.

    • #2
  3. Matt Bartle Member
    Matt Bartle
    @MattBartle

    A depressing post by Saad but hard to argue with.

    I’m at the point where I think if America just lasts 20 or 30 more years, that’ll be enough for me. 

    But I feel bad for the next generations.

     

    • #3
  4. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    • #4
  5. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Or maybe it’s always been there, but before technology, industrialism, etc. gave an illusion that people could easily get along without each other because food comes from the store and power comes from the wall, etc. (and before feminism gave many women an illusion that they could easily get along without men) it was more difficult and more dangerous to go that route.

    • #5
  6. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You’re knocking on DocLor’s door now.  The rise of “spiteful mutants.”

    @drlorentz, The Spiteful Mutants phone is ringing.

    • #6
  7. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    More Gad Saad, along the lines I posted just earlier:

    A lot of my super progressive liberal Jewish friends and colleagues are suddenly waking up and saying: “Oh no, it seems that we have a problem on our hands. Wow, I did not know that the problem was so bad. Who could have known!?”

    This is the problem with humans. They only respond when the issue personally affects them. Until then, people usually selfishly pursue the Ostrich Parasitic Syndrome strategy. 

    https://twitter.com/GadSaad/status/1715768295465345436

    • #7
  8. Franco 🚫 Banned
    Franco
    @Franco

    Gad Saad is one of the most thoughtful and psychologically stable ( advanced) human beings on earth. I’ve listened to hundreds of hours over the past several years and I’ve come to trust his insights and his perspective. He is one of my favorite professors in my podcast university.

    This man truly knows what he’s talking about. 
    As his humble student, this rings true. As soon as this occurred I recognized it as a devastating plot twist. Like when playing chess and one move changes the entire game. 
    How utterly foolish of us to be playing so aggressively and thinking we would win, or the clock will run out on our opponent, and suddenly we find ourselves without a good move. With mating threats everywhere.

    • #8
  9. Globalitarian Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    • #9
  10. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    • #10
  11. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously.  Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    • #11
  12. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    This is the main reason I’m glad I’m old. I should die just in time to miss the festivities. In the meantIme I’ll just try to live the best way I can despite this profound depression.

    • #12
  13. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously. Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    They are materially better. I think the average poor person in the U.S is spiritually worse than poor back in the day. The poor usually had a strong nuclear family that loved them and were told that G-d loved them. Their music was better as well.

     

    • #13
  14. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously. Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    They are materially better. I think the average poor person in the U.S is spiritually worse than poor back in the day. The poor usually had a strong nuclear family that loved them and were told that G-d loved them. Their music was better as well.

     

    But it seems we’re somehow incapable of making it so that people don’t lose all their teeth early and die early too, etc, without also losing other things that make life worth living.  I wonder why that would be?

    • #14
  15. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Douglass Murray writes about this in The Suicide of Europe . Europe seems tired and lost and lacking belief in itself and G-d and the future. The book Submission also discusses this but with alot of sex scenes.

    • #15
  16. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Douglass Murray writes about this in The Suicide of Europe . Europe seems tired and lost and lacking belief in itself and G-d and the future. The book Submission also discusses this but with alot of sex scenes.

    Mark Steyn also covered a lot of this in his book “America Alone” and in many interviews around that time.  One of which, from the Northern Alliance Radio Network in 2006, I still occasionally listen to again.

    • #16
  17. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously. Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    They are materially better. I think the average poor person in the U.S is spiritually worse than poor back in the day. The poor usually had a strong nuclear family that loved them and were told that G-d loved them. Their music was better as well.

     

    But it seems we’re somehow incapable of making it so that people don’t lose all their teeth early and die early too, etc, without also losing other things that make life worth living. I wonder why that would be?

    Having a kid out of wedlock meant that the mother and the child might die from tuberculosis. So people avoided doing stupid things that would hurt them more than our modern poor.

    Also, people were surrounded by death so they became more religious which oddly made the difficulty of life more endurable in a strange way.

    I lived in China for awhile. The poor peasants have to work and they have to have a strong  family to survive. It isn’t an option. I do not at all mean to make light of the difficulties that poverty forces on people. 

    But it seems better to be part of a poor Chinese family that supports each than to be a poor white in America whose Mom is on meth and who doesn’t have a Dad. At least that is what I can see.

    • #17
  18. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Douglass Murray writes about this in The Suicide of Europe . Europe seems tired and lost and lacking belief in itself and G-d and the future. The book Submission also discusses this but with alot of sex scenes.

    Haha.  You goof.

    • #18
  19. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Douglass Murray writes about this in The Suicide of Europe . Europe seems tired and lost and lacking belief in itself and G-d and the future. The book Submission also discusses this but with alot of sex scenes.

    Mark Steyn also covered a lot of this in his book “America Alone” and in many interviews around that time. One of which, from the Northern Alliance Radio Network in 2006, I still occasionally listen to again.

    Also, Bruce Bawer, While Europe Slept — a title with a pedigree.

    • #19
  20. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Strongly recommend Arthur Koestler’s neglected 1950 novel The Age of Longing, which is basically about the West’s loss of civilizational self-confidence.  Review and excerpts.

     

    • #20
  21. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously. Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    They are materially better. I think the average poor person in the U.S is spiritually worse than poor back in the day. The poor usually had a strong nuclear family that loved them and were told that G-d loved them. Their music was better as well.

     

    But it seems we’re somehow incapable of making it so that people don’t lose all their teeth early and die early too, etc, without also losing other things that make life worth living. I wonder why that would be?

    Having a kid out of wedlock meant that the mother and the child might die from tuberculosis. So people avoided doing stupid things that would hurt them more than our modern poor.

    Also, people were surrounded by death so they became more religious which oddly made the difficulty of life more endurable in a strange way.

    I lived in China for awhile. The poor peasants have to work and they have to have a strong family to survive. It isn’t an option. I do not at all mean to make light of the difficulties that poverty forces on people.

    But it seems better to be part of a poor Chinese family that supports each than to be a poor white in America whose Mom is on meth and who doesn’t have a Dad. At least that is what I can see.

    But if you can be a poor white in America whose mom ISN’T on meth and who DOES have a dad, that’s still better than China.

    • #21
  22. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Strongly recommend Arthur Koestler’s neglected 1950 novel The Age of Longing, which is basically about the West’s loss of civilizational self-confidence. Review and excerpts.

    Great write-up.  Highly recommend checking out the link.  To include the comments.

    • #22
  23. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    Me neither. 

    • #23
  24. BDB Inactive
    BDB
    @BDB

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    Me neither.

    I didn’t say I was going without a fight.  And Bryan, you used to throw in the towel twice weekly around here.  Glad you’re feeling better.

    • #24
  25. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Globalitarian Misanthropist (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    You mean the one that causes affluenza?

    One possible name/diagnosis for what I described previously. Even today’s “poor” seem to have it, since they actually live so much better than the “poor” of the past.

    They are materially better. I think the average poor person in the U.S is spiritually worse than poor back in the day. The poor usually had a strong nuclear family that loved them and were told that G-d loved them. Their music was better as well.

     

    But it seems we’re somehow incapable of making it so that people don’t lose all their teeth early and die early too, etc, without also losing other things that make life worth living. I wonder why that would be?

    Having a kid out of wedlock meant that the mother and the child might die from tuberculosis. So people avoided doing stupid things that would hurt them more than our modern poor.

    Also, people were surrounded by death so they became more religious which oddly made the difficulty of life more endurable in a strange way.

    I lived in China for awhile. The poor peasants have to work and they have to have a strong family to survive. It isn’t an option. I do not at all mean to make light of the difficulties that poverty forces on people.

    But it seems better to be part of a poor Chinese family that supports each than to be a poor white in America whose Mom is on meth and who doesn’t have a Dad. At least that is what I can see.

    But if you can be a poor white in America whose mom ISN’T on meth and who DOES have a dad, that’s still better than China.

    BDB (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    Me neither.

    I didn’t say I was going without a fight. And Bryan, you used to throw in the towel twice weekly around here. Glad you’re feeling better.

    My Grandfather had to fight Nazis with his bayonet. He liberated a concentration camp. Then he came back to America and became an engineer for Boeing. 

    I don’t really have an option to throw in the towel. 

     

    • #25
  26. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    Me neither.

    Me, neither. But I might throw in a monkey wrench. 

    • #26
  27. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I’m wondering if a nihilistic gene was activated in our civilization. Could that be it??

    Douglass Murray writes about this in The Suicide of Europe . Europe seems tired and lost and lacking belief in itself and G-d and the future. The book Submission also discusses this but with alot of sex scenes.

    Mark Steyn also covered a lot of this in his book “America Alone” and in many interviews around that time. One of which, from the Northern Alliance Radio Network in 2006, I still occasionally listen to again.

    I’ve heard the sex scenes don’t measure up. Sorry, Mark. 

    • #27
  28. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    BDB (View Comment):

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    Me neither.

    I didn’t say I was going without a fight. And Bryan, you used to throw in the towel twice weekly around here. Glad you’re feeling better.

    I have been misunderstood. I have never thrown in the towel.

    I have fears for the future.  I voice them. 

    But fears ane old friends who need to speak ans this is the place.

    • #28
  29. thelonious Member
    thelonious
    @thelonious

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Well call me nuts but I am not ready to throw in the towel

    America is starting to feel like Apollo Creed getting pummeled by Ivan Drago. “Throw in the towel Rocky!! Throw in the towel!!” I’m in a morose mood this morning. 

    • #29
  30. WI Con Member
    WI Con
    @WICon

    JustmeinAZ (View Comment):

    This is the main reason I’m glad I’m old. I should die just in time to miss the festivities. In the meantIme I’ll just try to live the best way I can despite this profound depression.

    We’ve got 4 kids between 26 and 16 years old – I can’t afford to quit but make a point of tell my boys (they women in the house won’t hear it), that they need to learn multiple trades/skills. If I’m able to afford it, looking to get some rural acres and build on it so they aren’t indebted to large bank – intergenerational plan to build and keep weath within the family, pool resources.

    • #30
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