Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Why Linger?

 

From something I wrote on Facebook some years ago:

My grandfather, Hal Buckner Boone, was a doctor and missionary and pastor as well as either a regent, board member, or trustee for Baylor University, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Liberty University, and the Home Mission Board.

But before there was Hal Buckner there was Claude Leon, his father.  If you can believe the internet, he was born in 1885, when the Civil War was still a living memory.  (I’m sure this is the sort of information that can be confirmed, but I leave that job to someone else.)  Claude Leon was a Baptist Pastor in Texas; other than that, I never knew much about him.

As it turns out, some belongings of Pastor Claude Boone have been preserved by the Boone clan, and are currently housed in the old Hal Buckner homestead in Friendswood, TX.  I have not looked through them very systematically, but there are at least 8 notebooks which appear to consist mostly of notes on various Bible passages.  Many appear to be his old sermon notes from the 1940s and 30s, about 75 years old!

Now, on the one hand, it’s not good for these documents to just sit under a desk indefinitely, hardly ever looked at by anyone.  On the other hand, I don’t know what else should be done with them, and I for one don’t have time to study them very carefully.

So I decided to look over them just a little, photograph some interesting pages, and put them on Facebook for people who might like to get a glimpse at the life and ministry of Pastor Claude Leon Boone.  . . .

Now I’m going to use the photos on some Ricochet posts! Just one or two photos per post. I’ll be contributing these to the Quote of the Day series for a while.

Here, we have an evangelism message from Claude Leon. “Why linger?” he asks–why not come to Jesus now? He gives five reasons people wait to commit to following Jesus, and he responds to them.

My apologies that I hadn’t figured out how to take clearer photos in this early stage. But here is some of what I can make out:

One reason is, “I am waiting until I have enjoyed the world enough.” Claude Leon replies with Mark 8:36 (“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?”) and Psalm 16:11 (“at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore”).

Another reason is “I am waiting until I am better.” Claude Leon replies with Matthew 9:13: “I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.”

Good sermon stuff, that.

Published in Religion & Philosophy
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

There are 29 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Nohaaj Coolidge
    Nohaaj
    @Nohaaj

    awesome, for 2000 years, or 200, those words maintain deep meaning.  

    It’s nice that you took pics of the pages.  my eyes see the art and perseverance of the author, but can not really transcribe the words. 

     

    • #1
  2. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    awesome, for 2000 years, or 200, those words maintain deep meaning.

    It’s nice that you took pics of the pages. my eyes see the art and perseverance of the author, but can not really transcribe the words.

    This was 2013 or 2014 maybe. In 2017 I took more and better pictures from the whole stack of his notebooks.

    • #2
  3. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Very cool family history! I wonder if sermons will be preserved and read in 75 years from now when they’re written on computers and projected on screens. Will future generations still be able to watch YouTube videos of our current pastor’s sermons? 

    *****

    This post is part of the Ricochet Quote of the Day group writing project. Members can sign up to contribute this month or next on the extended version of the October Signup Sheet signup sheet.

    • #3
  4. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Have you ever been to Lanier Theological Library? On the other side of Houston from Friendswood.  

    • #4
  5. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Have you ever been to Lanier Theological Library? On the other side of Houston from Friendswood.

    No, unfortunately.

    • #5
  6. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Saint Augustine: My apologies that I hadn’t figured out how to take clearer photos in this early stage.

    A flatbed scanner is usually best, and pdf format is more compact, but might be difficult to get books onto the scanner.

    • #6
  7. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Saint Augustine: My apologies that I hadn’t figured out how to take clearer photos in this early stage.

    A flatbed scanner is usually best, and pdf format is more compact, but might be difficult to get books onto the scanner.

    And when I had a little time and desk space, in 2017, the best I could do was a smartphone. Such is life.  But there really were much clearer photos later.  I made a point of getting every page snapped and saved, though with no real record of where to find anything in particular.

    Hundreds of photos. It was epic.

    • #7
  8. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    One side of my family is German – my real name is obviously not Bastiat, it is extremely German.

    My great great great grandfather was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus Ohio from about 1880 – 1900.  We have some of his notebooks with his sermons in them, mainly from the 1880’s.  I can’t read them (they’re in German), but I should try to digitize them somehow.  

    Someday I’d love to try to find someone to translate them.  

    The church is still there – it’s a huge Lutheran Church.  Obviously the services are in English now, but I wonder what the services were like in the 1880’s.

    Today Columbus has around 1 million people in it.  In the 1880’s the population was 50,000 – largely German speaking.  It was a different place then.

    • #8
  9. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    One side of my family is German – my real name is obviously not Bastiat, it is extremely German.

    My great great great grandfather was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus Ohio from about 1880 – 1900. We have some of his notebooks with his sermons in them, mainly from the 1880’s. I can’t read them (they’re in German), but I should try to digitize them somehow.

    Someday I’d love to try to find someone to translate them.

    The church is still there – it’s a huge Lutheran Church. Obviously the services are in English now, but I wonder what the services were like in the 1880’s.

    Today Columbus has around 1 million people in it. In the 1880’s the population was 50,000 – largely German speaking. It was a different place then.

    I think you win!

    German translator, eh? Like @hartmannvonaue?

    Digitize them for your family, I say.  But if seminaries and museums and church historians know what’s good for them, they should take an interest on both our sets of notes!

    • #9
  10. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Saint Augustine (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    One side of my family is German – my real name is obviously not Bastiat, it is extremely German.

    My great great great grandfather was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus Ohio from about 1880 – 1900. We have some of his notebooks with his sermons in them, mainly from the 1880’s. I can’t read them (they’re in German), but I should try to digitize them somehow.

    Someday I’d love to try to find someone to translate them.

    The church is still there – it’s a huge Lutheran Church. Obviously the services are in English now, but I wonder what the services were like in the 1880’s.

    Today Columbus has around 1 million people in it. In the 1880’s the population was 50,000 – largely German speaking. It was a different place then.

    I think you win!

    German translator, eh? Like @ hartmannvonaue?

    Digitize them for your family, I say. But if seminaries and museums and church historians know what’s good for them, they should take an interest on both our sets of notes!

    Naw, there’s probably no El-jibbity stuff in them.

    • #10
  11. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Saint Augustine (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    One side of my family is German – my real name is obviously not Bastiat, it is extremely German.

    My great great great grandfather was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus Ohio from about 1880 – 1900. We have some of his notebooks with his sermons in them, mainly from the 1880’s. I can’t read them (they’re in German), but I should try to digitize them somehow.

    Someday I’d love to try to find someone to translate them.

    The church is still there – it’s a huge Lutheran Church. Obviously the services are in English now, but I wonder what the services were like in the 1880’s.

    Today Columbus has around 1 million people in it. In the 1880’s the population was 50,000 – largely German speaking. It was a different place then.

    I think you win!

    German translator, eh? Like @ hartmannvonaue?

    Digitize them for your family, I say. But if seminaries and museums and church historians know what’s good for them, they should take an interest on both our sets of notes!

    He died in 1902 of tuberculosis in his 50’s, presumably from visiting his parishioners in hospitals etc – common cause of death in those days among doctors and pastors.  I just visited his grave in Columbus a few months ago – the stone has fallen over but is in good repair:

    • #11
  12. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    I’m missing something.  How does Boone become Rohe?

    • #12
  13. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I’m missing something. How does Boone become Rohe?

    Boone is St. Augustine’s ancestor.

    Rohe is mine.

    • #13
  14. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I’m missing something. How does Boone become Rohe?

    Boone is St. Augustine’s ancestor.

    Rohe is mine.

    [face-palm] of course…

    • #14
  15. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Saint Augustine (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    One side of my family is German – my real name is obviously not Bastiat, it is extremely German.

    My great great great grandfather was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbus Ohio from about 1880 – 1900. We have some of his notebooks with his sermons in them, mainly from the 1880’s. I can’t read them (they’re in German), but I should try to digitize them somehow.

    Someday I’d love to try to find someone to translate them.

    The church is still there – it’s a huge Lutheran Church. Obviously the services are in English now, but I wonder what the services were like in the 1880’s.

    Today Columbus has around 1 million people in it. In the 1880’s the population was 50,000 – largely German speaking. It was a different place then.

    I think you win!

    German translator, eh? Like @ hartmannvonaue?

    Digitize them for your family, I say. But if seminaries and museums and church historians know what’s good for them, they should take an interest on both our sets of notes!

    Naw, there’s probably no El-jibbity stuff in them.

    No, I mean the real seminaries.

    • #15
  16. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    https://ricochet.com/1504525/quote-of-the-day-from-my-great-grandfathers-sermon-notes-streams-in-the-desert/

    • #16
  17. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Ahab and Elijah

    • #17
  18. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Abraham and Lot

    • #18
  19. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: The War That Will End War

    • #19
  20. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: The Fundamentals

    • #20
  21. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Much Havoc

    • #21
  22. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: To Love G-d Is To Love One Another

    • #22
  23. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Beware Any Self-Righteous Doctrine

    • #23
  24. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Second-Mile Religion

    • #24
  25. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: The Undefeatables

    • #25
  26. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Personal Identity After Death

    • #26
  27. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Satisfaction in Christ

    • #27
  28. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: Moses Chose to Leave All Treasures Earthly

    • #28
  29. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Last in the series:

    Quote of the Day from My Great-Grandfather’s Sermon Notes: The Earth Is a Mere Segment

    • #29
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.