Why Cuccinelli Is Going to Lose—and It’s Not Because of the Tea Party

 

Republican Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli will lose the gubernatorial race in Virginia, not because of the Tea Party and the government shutdown, but because of women. While it’s true that Republicans were hurt by the shutdown, the gender gap has always been, and will continue to be, the deciding factor in Virginia.

In August, 50 percent of women supported Democrat Terry McAuliffe while only 38 percent favored Cuccinelli—and that was before the shutdown. The only thing the shutdown has done is add more fuel to an already intensely burning fire (as well as throwing greater support to the Libertarian candidate).

Women favor bigger government; therefore, they opposed the shutdown more than men. This only solidified their support for McAuliffe, but the shutdown did not actually change the trajectory of the race. Cuccinelli has been losing among women because of social issues, and he is continuing to lose.

McAuliffe has been outspending Cuccinelli for months, hammering issues like women’s healthcare rights and abortion—the social issues Cuccinelli and the Republicans would rather avoid.

One of his latest ads shows grainy footage of Cuccinelli talking about abortion to a Christian group in which he says, “Given that God does judge nations, it’s amazing that abortion has run as far and foully as it has without what I would consider to be a greater imposition of judgment on this country.” The ad fades to black and declares, “Too extreme for Virginia.” This, more than anything the Tea Party has done, will secure Cuccinelli’s defeat.

To further gin up the war-on-women narrative, McAuliffe has called in Hillary Clinton to campaign for him. At an event on Saturday—billed as a “Women for Terry” rally—Clinton said, “The whole country is watching to see if the rights of women and girls will be respected, especially over our own bodies and our health care.” Sounds like 2012 all over again!

McAuliffe is now ahead by eight points, 46 to 38 percent. His lead with women is at 20 points. Cuccinelli, however, still leads among men at 44 to 40 percent. This has been reduced by the government shutdown, but even at its pre-shutdown peak, Cuccinelli’s numbers still lagged behind McAuliffe (with the exception of some early leads from January to May) despite his advantage with men.

The race is reminiscent in many ways of the 2012 presidential election, in which Mitt Romney led among men and tried to steer clear of social issues in favor of the economy—a strategy that failed. The Republicans knew it would be close, but they believed stagnant job growth, skyrocketing debt, and President Obama’s failure to right the nation’s economy would secure the presidency for Romney. No matter what issues the Democrats brought up during the campaign, the Romney campaign stuck to their narrative: “It’s the economy, stupid!”

As it turned out, the only thing stupid was thinking it was all about the economy—because it was the war on women that made difference in the 2012 election. While many of us would prefer to leave social issues out of the debate, it’s impossible to do when your opposition keeps using it as a club to beat you down.

Fair or not, the Republican narrative failed, and Obama beat Romney 50.6 percent to 47.8 percent. At total of 55 percent of women and 45 percent of men voted for Obama; 44 percent of women and 52 percent of men voted for Romney. For the first time since 1952, a presidential candidate chosen by a majority of men—Mitt Romney—lost. More women voted for Obama.

Female support for Obama was particularly significant in Ohio, where the gender breakdown was similar to national figures. Of the top 10 battleground states, only North Carolina went to Romney. According to exit polls, female college students, unmarried professionals, and even many white suburbanites weren’t swayed by Romney’s message about the economy; they believed the election was about something just as important if not more so, something that drove them to vote for Obama, something the Republicans had dismissed in the campaign as being overly hyped and ultimately insignificant: free birth control.

The Democratic Party had been pushing the narrative of the GOP’s war on women throughout the presidential campaign, spreading the message that Republicans wanted to take away women’s contraceptives by not supporting the birth control mandate in Obamacare. The Romney campaign, however, was fully convinced American women would never put a propagandized issue like that over the very real, painful societal problems of poverty, national security, growing unemployment, and high costs of living that affected women across the nation.

Yet, women did just that. They believed the Democrats’ messaging and not the Republicans’. They’re doing the same in the Virginia gubernatorial race, and they will do so in the next presidential race if something doesn’t change.

While the shutdown didn’t work and the Republicans took a hit, it would be a grave mistake for the GOP to get riled up about the Tea Party and start blaming every loss and every setback on Ted Cruz and company. This will only create more divisions in the party. It is important that we keep our eye on the ball—winning elections. And we can’t win if we don’t do something about the war on women.

The GOP needs to get together and come up with a strategy on how to bridge the gender gap. In the midst of a political campaign, most Republicans don’t want to talk about social issues, but we have to find a way to deal with them regardless. The goal is to win, and you can’t win if you’re fighting about things that are not the real problem. While Republicans are beating each other up, Democrats are running sinister ads about abortion and free birth control—and they’re winning.

Let me repeat. Cuccinelli will lose. I hate to say it. I don’t like it, but he has been losing to McAuliffe for months, and he will continue to lose. The shutdown has made it worse, but it will not be the causal factor in Cuccinelli’s eventual loss. It’s the women, stupid. Republicans need to come up with a strategy to deal with that issue; if they do, maybe they’ll start winning some more elections.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MrDart

    As much as I like the sound of “Women For Terry!” I have to say that McAuliffe is the oiliest fellow on the political scene today.  He makes his pal Slick Willy look as rough as sandpaper.

    Generally I stay away from concern for elections in other states but I have family in Southern Virginia and visit there several times a year.  It’s sad to see the place in decline because of the DC/ government employee solid Democrat vote in NOVA.

    • #1
  2. Profile Photo Inactive
    @TheKingPrawn

    Why? Why do women become a single issue voting bloc? I hope they are merely being led astray rather than this being the best we can hope for them.

    • #2
  3. Profile Photo Coolidge
    @ctlaw

    There are almost two separate questions:

    1) what issue(s) to fight on; and

    2) once you’ve selected the issue(s) or they have been selected by others, actually fighting.

    Romney would not fight. He was just another in a series of Republican losers (Dole, McCain, and soon to be Christie) who took bad advice that if they told the truth about Democrats it would alienate the moderates.

    In the economic arena, Romney could have portrayed Obama as the economic destroyer he really is. Instead, he took the approach that Obama was a nice guy who just got in over his head in his first term. Perhaps he’ll do better in his second term… ;-)

    • #3
  4. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BarbaraKidder

    The sorry state of U.S. public education is a huge potential issue for Republicans to ‘engage’ women in;  women of all political persuasions!

    Women care, naturally, about their children’s education and it is plain to see that it is sadly wanting.

    Conservatives do not need to hammer away at the brainwashing that we see going on in these government schools;  there is plenty to call attention to in the abysmal test scores (which have declined steadily), the unsafe environment for teachers, as well as students, and the ‘one size fits all’ mindset of the Federal bureaucrats  to addressing these problems.

    The fact that so many teenagers ‘graduate’ from high school without the skills to figure out a percentage or read an instruction book should be a good starting point.

    • #4
  5. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    The King Prawn: Why? Why do women become a single issue voting bloc? I hope they are merely being led astray rather than this being the best we can hope for them. · 0 minutes ago

    I could write a whole book on this! (actually, I am—if I can ever finish it!). The problem with women is beyond a single issue. It’s even beyond feminism as we usually think of it—though this is a huge foundational problem. The problem is women are sexualized in their thinking. Not that they’re a bunch of sluts running around. That’s not what I’m saying, but sexual freedom ideas have seeped into their souls and clouded their rationality. They want to be “free,” and sexuality is big part of this mindset. They’re also motivated by sexuality—sexualization—and this is their golden calf to which they bow. It’s a huge problem.

    • #5
  6. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Barbara Kidder: The sorry state of U.S. public education is a huge potential issue for Republicans to ‘engage’ women in;  women of all political persuasions!

    Women care, naturally, about their children’s education and it is plain to see that it is sadly wanting.

    Conservatives do not need to hammer away at the brainwashing that we see going on in these government schools;  there is plenty to call attention to in the abysmal test scores (which have declined steadily), the unsafe environment for teachers, as well as students, and the ‘one size fits all’ mindset of the Federal bureaucrats  to addressing these problems.

    The fact that so many teenagers ‘graduate’ from high school without the skills to figure out a percentage or read an instruction book should be a good starting point.

    Sadly, they don’t care about education that much. I wish they did, but they don’t. According to Gallup (Oct. 2012), Abortion is the most important issue to women by 39%. Education: a whopping 2%. Taxes: 1%!!!! Only Jobs comes close at 19%. The way to win women is not to focus on one issue or another. It’s to change their thinking in general.

    • #6
  7. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MateDe

    The problem is that women (I am speaking as a woman here) tend to remember how they felt when something is said to them rather than what was actually said. An example would be if you said to your wife “Hey honey dinner is great but next time can you just remember, I don’t like mushrooms” Now men are just thinking “hey dinner is great but I don’t want to picking out the mushrooms” and She is thinking “Oh this jerk doesn’t apprieciate the hard work that went into making this meal for him, blah blah, blah” and when that conversation comes back up, it will get greatly exaggerated.

    So in political messaging women have to be engaged on an emotional level. I’m pro-life now but when I was pro-choice my reaction to a pro-life argument would be irrationally negative. You couldn’t talk me out of that position. I had to experience pregnancy first hand to make me realize that a life begins at conception. The Republicans need to use images and real stories of women who have had negative experiences with abortion or BC and run them constantly. 

    • #7
  8. Profile Photo Inactive
    @PsychLynne
    D.C. McAllister

    The King Prawn: Why? Why do women become a single issue voting bloc? I hope they are merely being led astray rather than this being the best we can hope for them. · 0 minutes ago

    I could write a whole book on this! (actually, I am—if I can ever finish it!). The problem with women is beyond a single issue. It’s even beyond feminism as we usually think of it—though this is a huge foundational problem. The problem is women are sexualized in their thinking. Not that they’re a bunch of sluts running around. That’s not what I’m saying, but sexual freedom ideas have seeped into their souls and clouded their rationality. They want to be “free,” and sexuality is big part of this mindset. They’re also motivated by sexuality—sexualization—and this is their golden calf to which they bow. It’s a huge problem. · 7 minutes ago

    It is huge–and I’m glad you’re going to address it!  Now if we can get the candidates to listen!

    • #8
  9. Profile Photo Member
    @WBob

    Why do you think women favor bigger government? I think they do too but why? Is it related to the sexualization of their thinking?

    • #9
  10. Profile Photo Inactive
    @TheKingPrawn
    D.C. McAllister

    The King Prawn: Why? Why do women become a single issue voting bloc? I hope they are merely being led astray rather than this being the best we can hope for them. · 0 minutes ago

    I could write a whole book on this! (actually, I am—if I can ever finish it!). The problem with women is beyond a single issue. It’s even beyond feminism as we usually think of it—though this is a huge foundational problem. The problem is women are sexualized in their thinking. Not that they’re a bunch of sluts running around. That’s not what I’m saying, but sexual freedom ideas have seeped into their souls and clouded their rationality. They want to be “free,” and sexuality is big part of this mindset. They’re also motivated by sexuality—sexualization—and this is their golden calf to which they bow. It’s a huge problem. · 10 minutes ago

    /Sigh

    When I was younger and less couth I would repeat the joke that the definition of a woman was “the life support system for a vagina.” Women today are working tirelessly to prove that bit of crude slander true.

    • #10
  11. Profile Photo Inactive
    @PsychLynne

    Cuccinelli is doomed–and it will be rough gong for my current state for a while.  McAuliffe makes me feel like that sloppy, drunk old guy who would hit on you when you were a college girl–ick!  However, his effective negative campaigning has gone unanswered for too long.  

    Matede: The problem is that women (I am speaking as a woman here) tend to remember how they felt when something is said to them rather than what was actually said. 

    So in political messaging women have to be engaged on an emotional level….The Republicans need to use images and real stories of women who have had negative experiences with abortion or BC and run them constantly.  · 3 minutes ago

    How haven’t Republicans leveraged the Gosnell mess by saying – we care about your health and value you-we don’t want this to happen to you (especially minorities)–

    • #11
  12. Profile Photo Inactive
    @CaptAubrey

    I don’t disagree with any of this although I don’t think my wife nor most of the women I know are quite so narrow minded, clearly many are, however, Chooch is a lousy candidate as well and the Governor has made a fool of himself with their connection to Star Scientific. A better candidate would have been able to mitigate the gender gap and beaten this Chicago Sleeze Ball but the party failed to find one.

    • #12
  13. Profile Photo Inactive
    @RJCool

    Isn’t the real issue of modern politics which party can convince a special issue group, not that their policies will improve their individual lives, but that the other party is “against” them.  Blacks and now hispanics have committed their votes to the Democrats despite there be no, not any, evidence that any of their policies are good for them (except maybe access to public sector jobs), but because they have been indoctrinated to believe Republicans are anti-black and anti-latino.  Southern white voters became a Republican force not because they were any more or less racist than Northern whites, but they were convinced that the Democrats were against them. Same for the religious right (and you can argue that the Republicans haven’t done much for either group).  I think women are more suceptible to the influence of MSM (Oprah, Today Show, that darling Brian Williams) which has a never-ending campaign for Dems and against Repubs. 

    I grew up in the Maryland of Ted Agnew and now live in a state, Virginia that is turning into a new liberal bastion using university beachheads and public sector dependence.  God help us, I’m heading south.

    • #13
  14. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Bob W: Why do you think women favor bigger government? I think they do too but why? Is it related to the sexualization of their thinking? · 2 minutes ago

    No, those are two issues. I think women have always favored bigger government because of security/safety net issues that women are prone to as women. The sexualization is a new factor (well, it’s old, but it’s something that has been happening since the sixties and it’s coming to fruition). They’re swayed by abortion and free birth control, as well as ads that exploit their sexuality (the Dunham ad that compared voting for Obama to having sex for the first time and the Vote Like Your Lady Parts Depend on it), not just because of the issues themselves, but because of the sexual freedom attached to them. They aren’t even offended by Democrats “marketing” them as sex objects–hence the sexualization mindset.

    • #14
  15. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    The King Prawn

    D.C. McAllister

    The King Prawn: Why? Why do women become a single issue voting bloc? I hope they are merely being led astray rather than this being the best we can hope for them. · 0 minutes ago

    I could write a whole book on this! (actually, I am—if I can ever finish it!). The problem with women is beyond a single issue. It’s even beyond feminism as we usually think of it—though this is a huge foundational problem. The problem is women are sexualized in their thinking….

    /Sigh

    When I was younger and less couth I would repeat the joke that the definition of a woman was “the life support system for a vagina.” Women today are working tirelessly to prove that bit of crude slander true. · 5 minutes ago

    Women are having a harder and harder time thinking outside the box—and the “box” consists of the walls of their vaginas. (sorry, don’t mean to violate the CoC, but I’m making a point in the war on women—and the “vagina vote”!)

    • #15
  16. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MateDe
    PsychLynne: How haven’t Republicans leveraged the Gosnell mess by saying – we care about your health and value you-we don’t want this to happen to you (especially minorities)–

    I don’t know. Why don’t think point out the conditions of these clinics and say we’re looking out for your health? I think that Republicans in general never want to bring up the social issues so they always end up on the defense. The Democrats always bring it up because they think its a winning issue and for women and disaffected people it usually is.

    Republicans need to stop being scared and go on the offense with this information. The abortion industry has horrible standards and many pro-life activists groups have been documenting the low hygine standards of the clinics and the fact that many of them are not reporting underage girls who get abortions that my be abused. Why not run ads pointing this out over and over again? Put the democrats on the defensive make them defend why the democrats voted no against a sex selection abortion ban, make them defend Gosnell’s clinic.

    • #16
  17. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MichaelC19fan

    Maggie Gallagher wrote an article for the Washington Post claiming Cuccinelli is losing because he is trying to avoid the abortion issue:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/cuccinelli-is-paying-the-price-for-the-gops-truce-strategy-on-abortion/2013/10/17/3c1ac994-3743-11e3-80c6-7e6dd8d22d8f_story.html

    What Ms. Gallagher does not mention in the article is the current R governor Bob McDonnell despite the best efforts of the Washington Post and the Democrats also used the same tactic of not talking about social issues when he won an overwhelming victory in 2009. The question is why is the Democrats “War on Women” message now delivering this election. One difference is in 2009 abortion was a dormant issue as Democrats controlled the Governors mansion for the past 8 years. But in 2012 the Republican controlled VA legislature brought up two bills that reignited the issue. First was one of those Personhood Bills defining life as beginning at conception. This bill was so toxic it was tabled. But the bill has provided ammunition to the Democrats claiming the GOP candidates want to ban contraceptives and make abortion illegal for cases of incest and rape.

    -Continued-   

    • #17
  18. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Capt. Aubrey: I don’t disagree with any of this although I don’t think my wife nor most of the women I know are quite so narrow minded, clearly many are, however, Chooch is a lousy candidate as well and the Governor has made a fool of himself with their connection to Star Scientific. A better candidate would have been able to mitigate the gender gap and beaten this Chicago Sleeze Ball but the party failed to find one. · 3 minutes ago

    Edited 2 minutes ago

    You could be right, of course, but looking at this election in light of the last presidential election and all the similarities, I stand by my post. I know there are level-headed women out there. Thank God! But most women aren’t. And a very, very high percentage of single women aren’t—young women and older ones. It’s just a reality we have to live with—and when it comes to national elections (though this is in Virginia, it has taken national tones and focus–and attention), the war on women is a deciding factor.

    • #18
  19. Profile Photo Member
    @WBob
    D.C. McAllister

    No, those are two issues. I think women have always favored bigger government because of security/safety net issues that women are prone to as women. The sexualization is a new factor (well, it’s old, but it’s something that has been happening since the sixties and it’s coming to fruition). They’re swayed by abortion and free birth control, as well as ads that exploit their sexuality (the Dunham ad that compared voting for Obama to having sex for the first time and the Vote Like Your Lady Parts Depend on it), not just because of the issues themselves, but because of the sexual freedom attached to them. They aren’t even offended by Democrats “marketing” them as sex objects–hence the sexualization mindset. · 4 minutes ago

    A lot of polls show most women being pro-life, and for the first time a majority of all voters were pro-life in a poll a few years back.  Do you think it it’s possible that even pro-life women can be swayed by pro-choice sentimentality?  

    • #19
  20. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Bob W

    D.C. McAllister

    No, those are two issues. I think women have always favored bigger government because of security/safety net issues that women are prone to as women. ….not just because of the issues themselves, but because of the sexual freedom attached to them. They aren’t even offended by Democrats “marketing” them as sex objects–hence the sexualization mindset. 

    A lot of polls show most women being pro-life, and for the first time a majority of all voters were pro-life in a poll a few years back.  Do you think it it’s possible that even pro-life women can be swayed by pro-choice sentimentality?   

    Yes. Those polls might show that, but they don’t vote that way when “women’s rights” are brought front and center in a debate.

    Women are very easily swayed by propaganda.

    • #20
  21. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Bob W

    D.C. McAllister

    No, those are two issues. I think women have always favored bigger government because of security/safety net issues that women are prone to as women. The sexualization is a new factor (well, it’s old, but it’s something that has been happening since the sixties and it’s coming to fruition). They’re swayed by abortion and free birth control, as well as ads that exploit their sexuality (the Dunham ad that compared voting for Obama to having sex for the first time and the Vote Like Your Lady Parts Depend on it), not just because of the issues themselves, but because of the sexual freedom attached to them….

    A lot of polls show most women being pro-life, and for the first time a majority of all voters were pro-life in a poll a few years back.  Do you think it it’s possible that even pro-life women can be swayed by pro-choice sentimentality?   

    Plus, I need to point out, abortion is not driving the war on women. Free birth control propaganda is. Abortion is just part of the bigger narrative.

    • #21
  22. Profile Photo Contributor
    @tommeyer
    D.C. McAllister:

    McAuliffe has been outspending Cuccinelli for months, hammering issues like women’s healthcare rights and abortion—the social issues Cuccinelli and the Republicans would rather avoid.

    …The race is reminiscent in many ways of the 2012 presidential election, in which Mitt Romney led among men and tried to steer clear of social issues in favor of the economy—a strategy that failed. 

    I haven’t been paying the closest attention, but I’m not sure I agree with the comparison. Cuccinelli has a pretty long history of being a culture warrior, but now doesn’t want to talk about it because it’s not popular.  Romney had no such record. As I remember, that was kinda sorta an issue for him in the primaries.

    • #22
  23. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MichaelC19fan

    -continued-

    The Pro-List movement has been pushing these Personhood Bills/Amendments across the country and they have been a consistent loser at the ballot box including in Mississippi. Every time one of the bills comes up the other side has always claimed the bill would ban contraceptives and make abortion illegal for rape/incest victims. One should not be surprised McAuliffe and company are beating the same drum.

    The other abortion related legislation is 2012 was restrictions along the line of the Texas law passed recently. An earlier version of the bill would of forced women who wanted an abortion to undergo an invasive ultrasound procedure. The negative feedback was so great that portion of the bill was dropped and the amended legislation became law. But once again it is providing lots of materials for Democratic “War on Women” ads. The reality of VA politics is around 35% of the electorate live in the DC suburbs of Northern Virginia (NoVa). NoVa has more in common on social issues with New York than Lynchburg, VA. The GOP stirred up the hornets nest and unfortunately it is going to pay a price this November.   

    • #23
  24. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MateDe
    D.C. McAllister

     

    I know there are level-headed women out there. Thank God! But most women aren’t.

    There are a few but sometimes I feel like an anomaly when I talk to some of my girlfriends.. Emotions overshadow so much of their thinking. I’m not a robot so of course emotions can get the better of me sometimes but I’m aware of it and can put myself back in check, too many women aren’t aware of it. And women have never been told that they need to combat their emotions, our society panders to it. Men are expected to combat their nature

    • #24
  25. Profile Photo Inactive
    @kafbst

    Part of this is that middle-aged Julias, who may not care so much about contraception now, are still invested in the idea. If they admitted that sexualized voting was wrong, they would undercut every life choice they’d made. The narrative must continue.

    I’ve come to believe that, more than any other group, Julias (young and old) need a plan from Republicans. A non-judgmental plan, whether we like it or not.

    • #25
  26. Profile Photo Inactive
    @DCMcAllister
    Tom Meyer

    D.C. McAllister:

    McAuliffe has been outspending Cuccinelli for months, hammering issues like women’s healthcare rights and abortion—the social issues Cuccinelli and the Republicans would rather avoid.

    I haven’t been paying the closest attention, but I’m not sure I agree with the comparison. Cuccinelli has a pretty long history of being a culture warrior, but now doesn’t want to talk about it because it’s not popular.  Romney had no such record. As I remember, that was kinda sorta an issue for him in the primaries.

    It doesn’t matter if they have a history as a culture warrior or not. That’s my point. The Dems will focus on the war on women no matter who the candidate is, what legislation they’ve impacted, or anything else—one way or another. My point is that we need to develop a strategy to counter it when they do—if that can even be done. (of course, the real battle against the war on women is long term and within and through the culture. Changing the hearts and minds of women in general).

    • #26
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    @MDWenzel

    It is exactly this type of thing that makes me pessimistic about the future of the country.  The idea that people actually buy into the Democrats childish memes on “Women’s Issues” or the “War on Women”  makes me doubt the ability of the average voter to rationally consider opposing political ideas or policies.

    Given people’s intense irrational attachment to candidates based on simplistic fact-free slogans I doubt we will ever move away from our current destructive course.

    • #27
  28. Profile Photo Member
    @WBob

    If women really fall for the idea that conservatives want to make it harder for them to get contraception, they really are beyond hope.  That’s a level of gullibility and ignorance that is almost incomprehensible in the information age.

    • #28
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    @Freesmith

    There is a connection here to the Cruz approach. The anti-Obamacare maximalists insisted that they needed to keep Americans from becoming addicted to the false pleasures of the ACA, that the law’s “goodies” would corrupt Americans’ souls. Social conservatives believe exactly the same thing is happening with abortion, even though millions of American women and men think – and vote! -otherwise. When those folks vote, they link abortion to birth control as reproductive freedom

    Just as Cruz had no end-game, neither do the anti-abortion social conservatives. Ask them what their goal is and their answers become all wishy-washy. None say that it is to shutdown all abortions. All opt for some form of compromise.

    But of course clever Democrats won’t let the social conservative politicians evade the logic of their position, the same logic that the shutdown caucus finally ran aground upon: Evil must be stopped. Principles must be defended.

    As in the unforced error of the debt-ceiling showdown Republicans who don’t support abortion rights as an individual choice end up on the horns of a dilemma – being either wishy-washy hypocrites whom women can’t really trust, or extremists.

    • #29
  30. Profile Photo Member
    @BasilFawlty

    Melvin Udall was right.

    • #30

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