There Is a ‘Rational’ Reason to Castrate Children

 

“There is no way to assess, say, the transgender movement with that mindset; policy papers don’t account for it – at all. If you have people who are saying, ‘I have an idea: let’s castrate the next generation; let’s sexually mutilate children,’ – I am sorry: that is not a political debate. … nothing to do with politics! What’s the outcome we’re desiring here? … I don’t think anyone could defend that as a positive outcome. … it’s irrational.” — Tucker Carlson

I think Tucker is wrong. I think there is a perfectly rational explanation for why people castrate our children. And it comes from a religious belief in the underlying power dynamics found within nature: the powerful defeat the weak.

Hitler sought a Race War because he believed that the law of nature is that the strong must engage with the weak, defeat it, and thus move the world forward. His ideology was logical, if the goal is to allow better (stronger) things to triumph over inferior (weaker) things.

In which case, we might better understand what makes people sacrifice children: to truly serve power, you must emulate power, by killing those who are weak, we elevate the strong. It is Might Makes Right, like the ultimate race war that Hitler sought in order to help nature reach its logical culmination.

Which explains why human sacrifice and cannibalism are found in every primitive (pagan) society in the world. And child sacrifice is at the heart of those societies. You can only sacrifice children because you are stronger than they are.  Sacrificing children is not merely idol worship. And it is not merely killing. It is about serving the ideology of power.

This helps us understand why the Chinese are bewildered when we are horrified that they execute criminals by removing their organs. Chinese murder in this way not only because it makes practical sense, but also because they can. For China and for Putin, power is its own justification. Worshipping power, by committing rape and war crimes in Ukraine, is just another way to worship Molech. These acts are not aberrations or exceptions: they are key components of a power-worshipping ideology.

What is “Molech” specifically? The letters for Molech are the very same as the letters for “Melech,” which is Hebrew for “king.” Molech is power.  The Torah is not in favor of powerful monarchs (a Jewish king, should we choose to have one, has strict power limits (Deut. 17:15). The very first king/melech named in the text is Nimrod (Gen. 10:8-9), who makes a sport out of hunting things that are weaker than he is – indeed, Nimrod is the first “hero” in the Torah, a man who makes everything about himself. Nimrod is the first to have a kingdom, and as a hero on the earth, he put himself ahead of all others. Nimrod is described as being “in front of/before G-d.” This has always been at the heart of Might Makes Right ideology – power is more important than G-d. Sacrificing children to Molech is sacrificing children on the altar of power. It is intrinsic to a Might Makes Right ideology, to the philosophy that eugenics and Hitler and today’s liberals all ascribe to.

Hitler correctly identified the Jewish people as dangerous to his work precisely because the ideology of Judaism is to see value in all people, to champion the weak, and to defeat the ideology of Might Makes Right wherever it is found.

In opposition to all things pagan, the Torah commands us to understand those who are not strong, and champion their cause. We insist that even the weak are valuable. It is why we had to be in Egypt – so that we can always understand how being oppressed feels. It is the core reason why we are commanded to love the stranger, the widow, and the orphan, why we are commanded to do justice, to give charity and tithes. It is why “love your neighbor as yourself” is the central verse at the precise center of the entire text of the Torah. (Lev. 19:18)

The ideology of Might Makes Right is our enemy. All women are inherently vulnerable when exposed to men in a state of nature – as when a man who claims to be a woman insists on access to the girls’ locker room, and will fight or even kill for that access. The weak will pay the price. So too, any woman who chooses to become pregnant is doubling down by committing the foolish error of making herself vulnerable. Having children at all is willingly embracing weakness for the sake of the future. Indeed, look at all the people who choose not to have children, because they want to enjoy life to its fullest, they do not want to be limited in their choices, or waste money on someone else. Practitioners of the new paganism, they do not want to weaken themselves when they can stay independent and strong.

It is true that when we invest in children, we weaken ourselves in the present in order to invest instead in the future. We surrender power today for possibilities tomorrow. This is the way of a healthy and holy society, one that is contradistinct from a society that lives in the moment, castrating children for the sake of glorifying power.

When we sacrifice our “seed to Molech,” it is also about giving up the future for the present. Seeds are the investment in the next generation, planning for the future. Indeed, every plant that puts energy into seeds – and every parent who chooses to have and nurture children – is giving up their own immediate pleasures and peaceful contentment for the sake of an uncertain future.

But today’s pagans are not interested in the future, or children. They fantasize about an earth that has washed away mankind without a trace. They are a death cult fixated on ending civilization in an Aztec-like orgy of murder and fire and cannibalism.

And we have to understand this in context. Tucker added:

Well, what’s the point of child sacrifice? Well, there’s no policy goal entwined with that. No, that’s a theological phenomenon.

Tucker is wrong because ultimately policy is a reflection of our world views. If we admire power for its own sake, then the theological phenomenon becomes a policy goal. The unfettered growth in power becomes, once restraints have been lifted, a voracious black hole of consumptive evil. Thanks to the growth in the technological powers of the state, the relative passivity of the populace when terrified by the Covid scare, and the self-serving ideology of Might Makes Right, we are at the turning point for humankind, at the very brink of losing all we hold dear. If we cannot save our children, then we cannot save our future.

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  1. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    While I agree with this:

    Right, we are at the turning point for humankind, at the very brink of losing all we hold dear. If we cannot save our children, then we cannot save our future.

    I disagree with your premise, that it’s might makes right which motivates adults to castrate children, and that in turn is “rational”. You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational 

    When looking for the motivation of adults seeking to castrate children, I think the word is “Covet”. Many people are bitter, confused and unhappy and covet the innocence and promise of youth. 

    Not talking about the mommies, who mainly suffer from Munchausen’s by proxy. 

    • #1
  2. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Annefy (View Comment):
    You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational 

    For me, there is nothing inherently good about reason in itself. Reason is a tool, not a touchstone for goodness or holiness.

    In the hands of good people, deploying reason leads to good. In the hands of bad people, reason leads to bad outcomes. Eugenics and Buck vs Bell are rational – but evil –  outcomes.

     

    • #2
  3. Franco Inactive
    Franco
    @Franco

    This is dogma. Too much mind -reading and forced conclusions with scant evidence. I honestly don’t understand why Ricochet is a chosen outlet for these odd theological musings. 

    • #3
  4. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Franco (View Comment):

    This is dogma. Too much mind -reading and forced conclusions with scant evidence. I honestly don’t understand why Ricochet is a chosen outlet for these odd theological musings.

    You have a problem with dogma? Why? 

    I can’t help but think of a quote by the great G. K. Chesterton: “In truth, there are only two kinds of people; those who accept dogma and know it, and those who accept dogma and don’t know it.”

     

    • #4
  5. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    iWe (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):
    You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational

    For me, there is nothing inherently good about reason in itself. Reason is a tool, not a touchstone for goodness or holiness.

    In the hands of good people, deploying reason leads to good. In the hands of bad people, reason leads to bad outcomes. Eugenics and Buck vs Bell are rational – but evil – outcomes.

     

    which has got what to do with my comment?

     

    • #5
  6. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Annefy (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):
    You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational

    For me, there is nothing inherently good about reason in itself. Reason is a tool, not a touchstone for goodness or holiness.

    In the hands of good people, deploying reason leads to good. In the hands of bad people, reason leads to bad outcomes. Eugenics and Buck vs Bell are rational – but evil – outcomes.

     

    which has got what to do with my comment?

     

    Apologies if I misunderstood! I thought you were suggesting that “rational” things are correct. If that was not implied by your comment, then I am sorry for the non sequitur.

    • #6
  7. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    iWe (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):
    You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational

    For me, there is nothing inherently good about reason in itself. Reason is a tool, not a touchstone for goodness or holiness.

    In the hands of good people, deploying reason leads to good. In the hands of bad people, reason leads to bad outcomes. Eugenics and Buck vs Bell are rational – but evil – outcomes.

     

    which has got what to do with my comment?

     

    Apologies if I misunderstood! I thought you were suggesting that “rational” things are correct. If that was not implied by your comment, then I am sorry for the non sequitur.

    Do not mean at all that “rational” = “correct”

    My point is that man is not by nature rational.

     

     

    • #7
  8. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Franco (View Comment):

    This is dogma. Too much mind -reading and forced conclusions with scant evidence. I honestly don’t understand why Ricochet is a chosen outlet for these odd theological musings.

    So why are we castrating children?

    • #8
  9. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    iWe (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):
    You and I have sparred before on what is and is not rational, and I don’t think that word is even remotely applicable to the situation in which we find ourselves. Mainly because mankind is not rational

    For me, there is nothing inherently good about reason in itself. Reason is a tool, not a touchstone for goodness or holiness.

    In the hands of good people, deploying reason leads to good. In the hands of bad people, reason leads to bad outcomes. Eugenics and Buck vs Bell are rational – but evil – outcomes.

     

    iWe, wouldn’t you agree that irregardless if an individual is good or bad, participating in logical activities helps ensure in a better outcome than participating in an illogical activity?

    Especially given that safety is often one of the primary issues surrounding an activity. 

    • #9
  10. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    While I agree we’re at the end of civilization, I disagree that mothers (mostly) are doing this to their children as an act of power — child sacrifice. 

    The power play I see at work is subjectivism — up to and including the power to define one’s gender apart from one’s biological sex.

    I think young people (especially girls) are feeling powerless in the fear-based culture we’ve created. The planet is doomed! There are domestic terrorist extremists living right next door!! I will be forced by totalitarians to carry a baby to term against my will, just like The Handmaids Tale!!!

    As Jonathan Haidt has explained there’s been a sharp rise in mental health problems among young people who feel powerless in the face of life (external locus of control). The one thing they can take control of, to which everyone must pay attention, and can even coerce people’s speech (preferred pronouns) is gender identity. 

    So there’s a will-to-power thing going on here, but it’s the power of godless subjectivism. And that scales up in our post-Judeo-Christian society in multiple ways. 

    • #10
  11. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):
    iWe, wouldn’t you agree that irregardless if an individual is good or bad, participating in logical activities helps ensure in a better outcome than participating in an illogical activity?

    How do you make an ironclad argument that playing a musical instrument is a logical activity?

    Deciding whether something is logical or not depends on the inputs to the argument, not the logical process itself.  

    • #11
  12. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    iWe (View Comment):

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):
    iWe, wouldn’t you agree that irregardless if an individual is good or bad, participating in logical activities helps ensure in a better outcome than participating in an illogical activity?

    How do you make an ironclad argument that playing a musical instrument is a logical activity?

    Deciding whether something is logical or not depends on the inputs to the argument, not the logical process itself.

    Just about opposite of that, iWe. Logic is the process. The propositions are immaterial. They can be, and frequently are, utter nonsense. It is all in how you get from A to B.

    • #12
  13. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    So iWe, you’re saying the horrific way we’re now abusing children is a symptom of our worship of power ?

    • #13
  14. thelonious Member
    thelonious
    @thelonious

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    This is dogma. Too much mind -reading and forced conclusions with scant evidence. I honestly don’t understand why Ricochet is a chosen outlet for these odd theological musings.

    So why are we castrating children?

    It’s fashionable. The left is about doing what’s fashionable. It’s not like they thought this thru.

    • #14
  15. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Percival (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):
    iWe, wouldn’t you agree that irregardless if an individual is good or bad, participating in logical activities helps ensure in a better outcome than participating in an illogical activity?

    How do you make an ironclad argument that playing a musical instrument is a logical activity?

    Deciding whether something is logical or not depends on the inputs to the argument, not the logical process itself.

    Just about opposite of that, iWe. Logic is the process. The propositions are immaterial. They can be, and frequently are, utter nonsense. It is all in how you get from A to B.

    This is my point. Most things we do “logical” if you accept any inputs. Conducting the process of logic has almost no bearing at all on whether the outcome is good or evil – it is the inputs that usually predetermine the outputs.

    • #15
  16. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Ansonia (View Comment):

    So iWe, you’re saying the horrific way we’re now abusing children is a symptom of our worship of power ?

    Yes.

    • #16
  17. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    I’ll put the part about logic as follows…

    By adjusting the inputs, I can make absolutely anything a ‘logical’ conclusion without violating any rules of logic.

    Woke inputs lead to Woke outputs.

    • #17
  18. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    iWe (View Comment):

    I’ll put the part about logic as follows…

    By adjusting the inputs, I can make absolutely anything a ‘logical’ conclusion without violating any rules of logic.

    And adjusting the inputs to be whatever I feel is true (about my gender, for example), allows godless subjectivist doctors to conclude that it’s right and good to cut off my healthy body parts and give me cancer-causing, sterilizing opposite-sex hormones. There’s the morally flawed logic grounded in subjectivism.

    “And you shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.”

    “Every man did what was right in his own eyes.”

    • #18
  19. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    iWe (View Comment):

    I’ll put the part about logic as follows…

    By adjusting the inputs, I can make absolutely anything a ‘logical’ conclusion without violating any rules of logic.

    Results matter, but they matter outside of logic itself. The gristmill grinds. It doesn’t matter whether it is wheat or corn.

    • #19
  20. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    While I agree we’re at the end of civilization, I disagree that mothers (mostly) are doing this to their children as an act of power — child sacrifice.

    The power play I see at work is subjectivism — up to and including the power to define one’s gender apart from one’s biological sex.

    I think young people (especially girls) are feeling powerless in the fear-based culture we’ve created. The planet is doomed! There are domestic terrorist extremists living right next door!! I will be forced by totalitarians to carry a baby to term against my will, just like The Handmaids Tale!!!

    As Jonathan Haidt has explained there’s been a sharp rise in mental health problems among young people who feel powerless in the face of life (external locus of control). The one thing they can take control of, to which everyone must pay attention, and can even coerce people’s speech (preferred pronouns) is gender identity.

    So there’s a will-to-power thing going on here, but it’s the power of godless subjectivism. And that scales up in our post-Judeo-Christian society in multiple ways.

    I agree with this. Their world is contracting around them until there’s nothing left but themselves. We’ve given children nowhere safe to look, to explore, to grow, to love.

    It is so screwed up. And tragic.

    • #20
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