Private Parts: The Memoirs of Captain Harry Wales

 

Crimenutely.

Subsequent to the leak of an English-language copy to The Guardian, and the “accidental” release–a week before its scheduled date–onto Spanish bookshelves of Prince Harry’s autobiography Spare (known in Spain as En La SombraIn the Shadow), the revelations have fallen thick and fast:

  • Prince William once shoved Harry into a dog bowl, causing Prince Harry (whose wife claims the Palace “Human Resource Department” wouldn’t let her seek psychiatric help because it would “look bad for the family”) to immediately phone his apparently on-call therapist.
  • His assertions that the royal family’s animosity towards Meghan stemmed from jealousy and their conviction that she was a “novel and resplendent” royal who would steal the limelight from the others and “dominate the monarchy.”  (Hang on.  Wasn’t it only last month that Harry and Meghan were slamming the British public in general, and the royal family in particular, as a bunch of racists who never gave the bi-racial Meghan a chance?  By George, I believe it was!)
  • The cocaine and marijuana-fueled parties during which he once had a conversation with a trash can in Courtney Cox’s bathroom.  (According to a Daily Telegraph translation of the Spanish language edition: “I stared at the bin. It stared back. Then it became… a head. I stepped on the pedal and the head opened its mouth. A huge open grin.” I expect he’d never had to work a pedal bin by himself before.  Previously, I bet the royal footman (see what I did there) did it for him.
  • The twenty-five Taliban he claims to have killed during his second Afghanistan tour.  First: kudos to him for serving on active duty.  Second, let’s leave aside the question of whether this is PTSD speaking, and let’s consider the strict practicality of whether it’s really wise–especially for a man who’s made such a fuss about what he claims are constant threats to his family’s security–to elevate his profile–almost ten years after the fact–with the Taliban, who’ve already responded sharply to this story, calling Harry a war criminal, at the same time as many former members of the British military have criticized his foolishness in bringing this up, especially when the royal family itself (the real one) is already a prime target for terrorists and this sort of thing only can only encourage them.
  • His conversations with his father, during which (then) Prince Charles is supposed to have said, “who knows if I am actually your father?” while laughing uproariously. I have to believe that the contemporary stories that Harry wasn’t Charles’s son, but that he was the by-blow of one of Diana’s several paramours, must have been hurtful, either at the time, or when Harry first became aware of them.  How sad it is that–at the age of almost 40–he thinks to revive it, to give it the imprint of legitimacy (there I go again) by including discussion of it in his “official” autobiography, and–thereby–passing along to all the possibility of pondering whether his own children are, biologically-speaking, not members of the royal family, either.   Good grief.
  • Harry’s resentment that William and Kate lived in a lovely home filled with priceless antiques and walnut furniture, while he and Meghan had to make do with IKEA lamps and seating arrangements purchased with Meghan’s credit card from a place called “sofa.com.” (No mention, I bet, of the $3.2 million of British taxpayer money that went into renovating the ten-bedroom Frogmore Cottage for the two of them to live before their son Archie was born.  After they moved to the States, they were required to repay the money, but Frogmore remains–at the pleasure of Harry’s father, King Charles–their home base in the UK.)
  • Harry’s mental trauma when, at the age of 28, he moved out of Clarence House (his father’s residence), only to return at some point to discover that Camilla had turned his bedroom into her dressing room.  “I tried not to care.  But especially the first time I saw it, I cared.”  My God.  Talk about first-world problems.
  • His fury that William at first refused to go on a pre-wedding “walkabout” with him the night before Harry’s marriage to Meghan and that then, rather than spending the night with Harry, William chose to return home to his wife and three children, the youngest of whom was about a month old at the time.

And on and on and on, page after page, grievance after sad grievance from Babybraingate to Balmoralgate, Paranormalgate, Baldiegate, and beyond.  Who knows how many, and how much, of any of it is true?  It’s not as if Harry and Meghan don’t have form when it comes to gilding the lily and embellishing the facts, or in making what seem like rather pedestrian and obvious circumstances, and rather normal family spats into something unique, special, and all about them. And it’s very easy to wonder when reading of or about some of this stuff if Harry is quite all there, or if he’s somehow lost the plot.  (These sorts of musings are not helped by Harry’s claims that he’s being kept “physically and mentally strong” by a phalanx of energy practitioners, life coaches, yogis, therapists, Pilates coaches, personal trainers, acupuncturists, fitness consultants, and chiropractors.  It’s possible, as F. Scott Fitzgerald might say, to hold in one’s mind at the same time both the thought that one should respect the efforts of another to live a healthy and normal life, and some dismay that this many people might be necessary in order to help a person simulate one. That’s separate and distinct from wondering about the sort of advice that Harry’s counselors seem to be giving him, and if it’s really helping him or not.)

But by far, the oddest revelations in Spare (or at least in the heretofore reported portions from reputable news sources, as reported by The Guardian, or as translated from the many available Spanish copies) are those that center on Prince Harry’s penis. (I was thinking of calling it “Prince Harry’s Willy,” but–given another of the revelations in the book–this would introduce yet another unnecessary and baffling level of incoherence.)

As an increasingly elderly, and reasonably genteel woman, I will say that I could have quite happily made it to the close of my life without knowing anything at all about Harry’s meat and two veg.  I mean, really.  It’s a subject that no normal man of my acquaintance feels compelled to keep bringing up at great length.  And–if it’s something he finds it hard to ignore–it’s a subject on which I hope he limits discussion to either his sweaty mates in the locker room, to his service buddy next to him in the trench, or while he’s on the couch talking to his psychotherapist.

But the book is not even in widespread release yet, and I can’t turn on any news broadcast, or check in to any news site without learning that:

Harry lost his virginity to an older woman behind an English pub when he was sixteen or seventeen.   He describes it as a  “humiliating episode with an older woman who liked horses a lot and treated me like a young stallion…I mounted her quickly, after which she spanked me on the backside and sent me on my way.”

The opportunities for mockery here are endless, and perhaps best expressed in a Telegraph article by Guy Kelly:

The inquisition now begins into who exactly the equestrian cherry popper was, if she hasn’t disappeared across the plains and into the forest…But henceforth, it ought to become a mandatory question for all women who find themselves in the middle of a Venn Diagram featuring circles labelled “older than Harry” and “Know Your Way Around A Horse.”

Good Lord.

Then there’s the disclosure that Harry was circumcised as an infant.  As with much else, the story is couched in resentful terms: Harry appears to think that the majority of the world’s people were deeply invested in contemporary reports speculating that his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, did not believe in circumcising male infants and that the procedure had not been undertaken as a result.

There were countless stories in books and papers (even The New York Times) about Willy and me not being circumcised….

I guess I missed them.  All.

(I have to confess, too, that I wasn’t exactly sure if the phrase “Willy and me” indicated that Harry regards his penis as a separate entity and friend with which he has regular chats (I have known such people), or if he was referring to his brother, but then (thankfully) he cleared it up by saying):

I was snipped as a baby.

TMI.  I mean, good to know.

Then there’s the Tale of the Frosty Todger (channeling Beatrix Potter), Harry’s frostbitten penis, which he tells us he was carrying around with him at William and Kate’s wedding (an event at which he asserts that his documented, on-camera role as best man was a “complete lie.”)

It appears that the catastrophe occurred during Harry’s four-day stint on a charity trek to the North Pole to raise money for wounded servicemen.  (Worthy.)  Apparently, Harry and his father (then Prince Charles) had a discussion about the experience at William and Kate’s pre-wedding dinner:

Pa was very interested and sympathetic about the discomfort of my frostnipped ears and cheeks, and it was an effort not to overshare and tell him also about my equally tender penis…

I’d not have thought the concept of “oversharing” is one which ever enters Harry’s head, so I’m not sure what to make of this.

Eventually, Harry sought medical assistance for his “todger,” telling the doctor that sitting and walking were “difficult,” and that sex was “impossible.”  The doctor told him it would heal with time, an opportunity (imagine my surprise) for Harry to observe that “that hasn’t been my experience” as it relates to his mother’s death.

I’m not going to speculate on what on earth compels Harry to share such specific, personal, and inappropriate reminiscences with the world, although I’ll say that–generally–his memoirs seem to be motivated by two underlying grievances: The first is the jealousy and resentment he appears to feel towards his brother because he wasn’t the firstborn, and the second seems to be his sense that his wife is in some way a reincarnation of his mother. It’s all deeply weird.

And sad.

I doubt that any scion of the House of Windsor has ever stood as high in the affections of his people as Prince Henry Charles Albert David, the much-loved younger son of Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales.  The mischievous imp.  The young schoolboy.  And, in an image seared into the minds of anyone who saw it and is old enough to remember, the desperately unhappy little boy walking behind his mother’s coffin.

And I don’t recall a moment of such royal and public joy as the moment when Harry announced that he’d met the love of his life and was going to marry, Meghan Markle.  (Beloved as Kate is, the preceding “Waity Katie” decade of her relationship with William made the eventual announcement of their engagement rather anti-climactic.)

And yet, five years later, here we are.

Sometime last year, when Harry announced that he was writing a book, he said:

I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

While I doubt the veracity of many of the “revelations” in this self-serving, oversharing, and often cringeworthy autobiography, I’m sure the above statement is absolutely true.

This is the man he has become.

And–although it hasn’t been fully told yet–that will very likely be the saddest story of all.

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  1. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    For someone who constantly complains about his lack of privacy, he sure makes a spectacle out of everything he and his wife do . . .

    • #1
  2. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Just as the weak Charles was the quintessential  boomer royal, now we have the perfect Millenial royal couple.  How sad that the dedicated queen had to see this after all of her sacrifice and dedication for so long.  Meghan Markle is one archetype for that crazy/hot chart.

    • #2
  3. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    So much of what’s been reported and quoted from interviews lacks credibility, as @she points out. And – it smacks of the ghost  writer desperately looking for something, anything more to fill the pages and get to the word count. Prompting, asking and then expanding on his little memories. For many quotes I wondered : Does anyone really talk like that? But writers do write like that. 

    As an EODMom, I guarantee that serious warriors (who are also serious people generally) do not talk about the enemy that way, and keep their mouths shut about missions. Even years on others may be put at risk if they do. 

    It’s hard to pick an absurdity but as an ordinary mom:  his report of using up his wife’s nitrous while she was in labour (as if it’s just a kinda funny amusing little anecdote) and seemingly fooling around in the labour and delivery room strikes me as maybe the worst. It strongly suggests he still uses drugs for fun. He didn’t take his wife’s condition very seriously and he put the medicos in an untenable situation: who would be at fault if something went sideways in that delivery? 

    What a revolting man. 

    • #3
  4. She Member
    She
    @She

    There’s a terrific essay today in, of all places, The New York Times, by, of all people, Ron and Nancy’s daughter, Patti Davis.  Titled Prince Harry and the Value of Silence, it may be behind the paywall.    In it, she describes apologizing to her father, while he was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, for an autobiography she’d written some years earlier–and which she now openly says she regrets writing–in which she’d had a similar sort of “ventfest” as Harry is having now.

    She touches on the unpredictability of time and life, and of the “gift” of time she had with her father, and of the opportunity she had to make things right with him before he died.  And that we don’t always get that opportunity.

    King Charles’s words [“Please, boys, don’t make my final years a misery”] reveal a man who is aware of his mortality and who would like his offspring to be aware of it as well.

    I’ve learned something else about truth: Not every truth has to be told to the entire world…Not everything needs to be shared, a truth that silence can teach.  Harry seems to have operated on the dictum that “Silence is not an option.”  I would, respectfully, suggest to him that it is.

    • #4
  5. Eustace C. Scrubb Member
    Eustace C. Scrubb
    @EustaceCScrubb

    “Amazon overnight delivery – don’t fail me now!” A phrase, I doubt, any Ricochet reader is using in reference to this book.

    • #5
  6. Misthiocracy has never Member
    Misthiocracy has never
    @Misthiocracy

    I hate that I once quipped that I would have welcomed Harry as Canuckistan’s Governor-General after he finished his military service.

    • #6
  7. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    She: The twenty-five Taliban he claims to have killed during his second Afghanistan tour.  First: kudos to him for serving on active duty.  Second, let’s leave aside the question of whether this is PTSD speaking, and let’s consider the strict practicality of whether it’s really wise–especially for a man who’s made such a fuss about what he claims are constant threats to his family’s security–to elevate his profile–almost ten years after the fact–with the Taliban, who’ve already responded sharply to this story, calling Harry a war criminal, at the same time as many former members of the British military have criticized his foolishness in bringing this up, especially when the royal family itself (the real one) is already a prime target for terrorists and this sort of thing only can only encourage them.

    It’s all horrible, but this is the worst of it and him. What a terrible thing to do–he’s causing problems for a lot of people by writing this. Dear lord, where were his editors? It smacks of someone who has never been told no, has never thought of anyone other than himself, for his entire life. 

    He is the polar opposite of Queen Elizabeth whose every waking moment was spent in the service of others. Also Harry’s great-grandmother–Philip’s mother Princess Alice. 

    I’ll put this out of my mind. He no more represents the royal family than Edward VIII did. 

    Frankly, he sounds vaguely mentally ill. This post puts Meghan’s manipulation of him in a different light for me. She’s worse than I thought. She is a conniving person, and he seems to be her “mark.” 

    • #7
  8. She Member
    She
    @She

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Dear lord, where were his editors?

    Yes, between and among his wife, his ghostwriter, the editors, his friends, those who in one or another professional or para-professional capacity are supposed to be ‘helping’ him, one is entitled to wonder where the problem lies.

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Philip’s mother Princess Alice.

    A very interesting lady.  And whatever one thinks of Philip in his later years, once must acknowledge that in light of his own traumatic early life, he turned out rather better than his grandson.

    (Sixth in line to the Greek throne (talk about “spare!”).  Father accused of treason and exiled when Philip was an infant when, legend has it, he was smuggled out of Greece in an orange crate. A peripatetic existence due to an unstable family, a mother who was regularly institutionalized and a father who fled the family with his mistress.  When Philip was ten, a complete communication breakdown between his nuclear family members for about fifteen years as he was raised by members of his extended family. Sister and brother-in-law and their two children killed in a plane crash when he was 16.  His guardian’s sudden death from cancer two years later.  Sisters married to prominent Nazis.  And so on.)

    I’ll spot Harry the tragic death of his mother.

    For the rest of it? Such as the story of how–when Meghan borrowed Kate’s lip gloss, Kate “grimaced,” and Harry realized for the first time that Kate must be  “on edge” because she was coming to realize that for the rest of her life, she’d “be compared to, and forced to compete with, Meg.”  Can you say, “projection?”

    What a loon.

    • #8
  9. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    She: That’s separate and distinct from wondering about the sort of advice that Harry’s counselors seem to be giving him, and if it’s really helping him or not.

    My advice to Harry, “Zip it!” That includes the lips and anything else that needs to be zipped. My bill will be in the post.

    • #9
  10. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Eustace C. Scrubb (View Comment):

    “Amazon overnight delivery – don’t fail me now!” A phrase, I doubt, any Ricochet reader is using in reference to this book.

    @she provides all I need to know. This is all new information for me.

    • #10
  11. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    She:

    Sometime last year, when Harry announced that he was writing a book, he said:

    I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

    While I doubt the veracity of many of the “revelations” in this self-serving, oversharing, and often cringeworthy autobiography, I’m sure the above statement is absolutely true.

    This is the man he has become.

    This does not sound as if he became a man at all.

    • #11
  12. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    What is wrong with Meghan’s face? She has the strangest face. It is as if all her facial muscles above the cheeks are frozen into a perpetually open hurt-victim expression. Some strange intersection of chemical and emotional engineering is at work there.

    • #12
  13. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    She (View Comment):
    Such as the story of how–when Meghan borrowed Kate’s lip gloss, Kate “grimaced,”

    Ew!

    • #13
  14. She Member
    She
    @She

    Arahant (View Comment):

    She:

    Sometime last year, when Harry announced that he was writing a book, he said:

    I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

    While I doubt the veracity of many of the “revelations” in this self-serving, oversharing, and often cringeworthy autobiography, I’m sure the above statement is absolutely true.

    This is the man he has become.

    This does not sound as if he became a man at all.

    Exactly.

    Arahant (View Comment):

    She: That’s separate and distinct from wondering about the sort of advice that Harry’s counselors seem to be giving him, and if it’s really helping him or not.

    My advice to Harry, “Zip it!” That includes the lips and anything else that needs to be zipped. My bill will be in the post.

    LOL.  My sister and I had exactly this conversation earlier today.

    Barfly (View Comment):

    What is wrong with Meghan’s face? She has the strangest face. It is as if all her facial muscles above the cheeks are frozen into a perpetually open hurt-victim expression. Some strange intersection of chemical and emotional engineering is at work there.

    I think she’s always just one stage direction away from “Meghan, one tear, left eye, go!”

     

    • #14
  15. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    She (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Philip’s mother Princess Alice.

    A very interesting lady. 

    Yes, and for all her troubles in the 1930s, she recovered, stayed in Athens during the war, helped hide Jews (for which she was named as a Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem), became an Orthodox nun, and founded a nursing order of Greek Orthodox nuns, the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary. (which eventually failed due to lack of applicants). She’s buried at the Convent of Saint Mary Magdalene in Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem (near her aunt Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, a Russian Orthodox saint).

    As you say, She, a very interesting lady/.

    • #15
  16. She Member
    She
    @She

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Philip’s mother Princess Alice.

    A very interesting lady.

    Yes, and for all her troubles in the 1930s, she recovered, stayed in Athens during the war, helped hide Jews (for which she was named as a Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem), became an Orthodox nun, and founded a nursing order of Greek Orthodox nuns, the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary. (which eventually failed due to lack of applicants). She’s buried at the Convent of Saint Mary Magdalene in Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem (near her aunt Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, a Russian Orthodox saint).

    As you say, She, a very interesting lady/.

    Yes, one who turned extraordinary personal hardship and family tragedy into a force for good.  

    • #16
  17. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    She (View Comment):

    There’s a terrific essay today in, of all places, The New York Times, by, of all people, Ron and Nancy’s daughter, Patti Davis. Titled Prince Harry and the Value of Silence, it may be behind the paywall. In it, she describes apologizing to her father, while he was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, for an autobiography she’d written some years earlier–and which she now openly says she regrets writing–in which she’d had a similar sort of “ventfest” as Harry is having now.

    She touches on the unpredictability of time and life, and of the “gift” of time she had with her father, and of the opportunity she had to make things right with him before he died. And that we don’t always get that opportunity.

    King Charles’s words [“Please, boys, don’t make my final years a misery”] reveal a man who is aware of his mortality and who would like his offspring to be aware of it as well.

    I’ve learned something else about truth: Not every truth has to be told to the entire world…Not everything needs to be shared, a truth that silence can teach. Harry seems to have operated on the dictum that “Silence is not an option.” I would, respectfully, suggest to him that it is.

    I know this, that not every truth need be shared, is true.

    • #17
  18. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    I think that Prince Harry needs some help, and he’s not going to find the help he needs from some of the aimless, and unanchored celebrities that surround him and Meghan. Meghan might need some help herself.

    • #18
  19. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    In the old days Harry would have made a trip to Versailles, asked the French to help him raise an Army and then storm Buck House to resolve his daddy issues. Instead we get the incessant whining of a toddler.

    Thank God, Grandmama is dead. What an embarrassment.

    • #19
  20. She Member
    She
    @She

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    I think that Prince Harry needs some help, and he’s not going to find the help he needs from some of the aimless, and unanchored celebrities that surround him and Meghan. Meghan might need some help herself.

    Agreed that Harry is in with a pretty feckless crew. I don’t speak as someone who’s credentialed in any sense other than through what H&M would doubtless call my “lived experience” (what other kind is there, I keep asking myself?) of family mental illness and my encounters with narcissism, but I think he’s in a pretty bad place.

    I remember, years ago, when William and Kate and Harry founded a new mental health charity with an emphasis on the young, how very celebrated Harry was for acknowledging his mental health issues.  At the time, he gave much credit to William for supporting him, and ultimately, for insisting that he seek help and for getting him to a professional.

    I don’t know where that Harry went, but I’d love to see some of the sycophantic present-day interviewers ask him.  But they won’t.

    I fear Harry is, in more ways than he perhaps realizes, his mother’s son.  Diana, for all her winning ways, wasn’t above stirring the pot. (She used to say, for example, that she thought William would make a better king than Charles, and that perhaps Charles wasn’t fit for the “top job.”  Whether or not she was right doesn’t alter the fact that it was wrong for her to say it as often and as publicly as she did.  So I can only conclude that there were other little worms that she was dropping in her sons’ ears, to who knows what effect.)

    It’s understandable that Harry loathes the press the way he does.  And while the (reasonably) reputable British press has done its best to separate itself from the “paparazzi” and claim that they are different,  they can’t escape the fact that it was the BBC, in Martin Bashir’s infamous Panorama interview with Diana, who utterly betrayed every canon of journalistic ethics, and fueled her paranoia with regard to the royal family and the press.

    As I wrote in my post about it, when the verdict finally came down, twenty-six years later:

    It’s a post about a disgusting, appalling violation of journalistic ethics and about the man who committed them and then profited from his manipulation and betrayal of the woman and the family who had made his career.  It’s about a once-respected giant of the broadcast industry and its fall from grace and descent into ignominy and disrepute.  It’s about (finally) a few chickens coming home to roost, and about (sadly) the likely projection of fallout from utterly unspeakable behavior into the next generation and probably beyond.

    • Bashir had a friend who was a graphic artist mock-up fake bank statements appearing to show that a newspaper group had been paying a member of Earl Spencer’s senior staff thousands of pounds for over a year to spy on Diana.

    • Bashir told Earl Spencer that both Charles and Diana’s private secretaries were being paid (I don’t think it’s clear by whom) to surveil Diana.  Those claims, in the report, are adjudged to be completely without evidence or substantiation and are deemed false.

    • That in his first meeting with Diana, at which her brother took contemporaneous notes, Bashir told the Princess that her telephones were being bugged and that she was being followed everywhere and constantly spied upon by members of the Royal Family and its staff, and by MI6.  Again, there was no evidence for any of this.  The only actual “evidence” presented for anything appears to have been the proven fraudulent bank statements.

    • It’s also widely reported that Bashir told Diana that Prince William had been given a watch that contained electronics to track his mother’s every move.

    Upon reading the Dyson Report (which found the BBC culpable of gross violations of any standard of journalistic ethics at all, the normally restrained Prince William said:

    It brings indescribable sadness to know that the BBC’s failures contributed significantly to [Diana’s] fear, paranoia and isolation that I remember from those final years with her.

    A reminder that–although Harry wants to own the Diana narrative all on his own account–she actually had another son who remembers her too.  One who apparently weathered the storm of his mother’s last years and her mental illness better than her younger son, and who is probably no less scarred by the experience, but who seems to be showing every sign of not wanting to pass the mistakes of the past on to the next generation.

    Oddly, that’s what Harry himself claims to want to do.  But he’s going a damn funny way about it:

    William also asked the BBC and, I think, the rest of British media, that the interview never be broadcast again.  They agreed.  However, Harry and Meghan found footage of it, and included lengthy clips in their Netflix moanumentary.

    • #20
  21. She Member
    She
    @She

    Oh.  I just re-read my entire post about the Bashir interview (post was written in May of 2021).  Excerpt from last paragraph:

    If Harry has any real friends left, I hope one of them will urge him to look through the other end of the telescope, or perhaps buy himself a mirror.  The “fear, paranoia, and isolation” to use William’s descriptive phrase of what came to represent his mother’s state of mind which eventually caused Diana to flee, even in very ill-advised ways, from the intrusive, greedy, self-serving, and manipulative paparazzi seems to be impelling her son to run right into their arms.  I don’t see how that can end well, either.

    Yeah.  The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    • #21
  22. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    She (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    She:

    Sometime last year, when Harry announced that he was writing a book, he said:

    I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

    While I doubt the veracity of many of the “revelations” in this self-serving, oversharing, and often cringeworthy autobiography, I’m sure the above statement is absolutely true.

    This is the man he has become.

    This does not sound as if he became a man at all.

    Exactly.

    Arahant (View Comment):

    She: That’s separate and distinct from wondering about the sort of advice that Harry’s counselors seem to be giving him, and if it’s really helping him or not.

    My advice to Harry, “Zip it!” That includes the lips and anything else that needs to be zipped. My bill will be in the post.

    LOL. My sister and I had exactly this conversation earlier today.

    Barfly (View Comment):

    What is wrong with Meghan’s face? She has the strangest face. It is as if all her facial muscles above the cheeks are frozen into a perpetually open hurt-victim expression. Some strange intersection of chemical and emotional engineering is at work there.

    I think she’s always just one stage direction away from “Meghan, one tear, left eye, go!”

     

    She’s one of those miserable creatures who is always “on stage.”

    • #22
  23. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Philip’s mother Princess Alice.

    A very interesting lady.

    Yes, and for all her troubles in the 1930s, she recovered, stayed in Athens during the war, helped hide Jews (for which she was named as a Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem), became an Orthodox nun, and founded a nursing order of Greek Orthodox nuns, the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary. (which eventually failed due to lack of applicants). She’s buried at the Convent of Saint Mary Magdalene in Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem (near her aunt Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, a Russian Orthodox saint).

    As you say, She, a very interesting lady/.

    She has always been an inspiration to me. 

    • #23
  24. She Member
    She
    @She

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):
    [Meghan Markle is] one of those miserable creatures who is always “on stage.”

    Agreed.  I’ve mentioned before the difference between “celebrity” and “royalty.” A point I heard most succinctly made a few years ago by Mark Steyn, in which he said something to the effect that if you’re a celebrity and you show up at an event it immediately becomes all about you, how wonderful you are, what you’re wearing, and who you’re seen with.  Whereas if you’re a royal, and you visit a children’s hospital, the story will be about the kids.  Or if you end up in  Huddersfield, planting a tree in the pouring rain, the story will be all about the background.

    Most recently, the first royal to step out since Harry’s memoirs hit the skids is, of course, 72-year old Princess Anne.  And where was she?   She was at the “Oxford Farming Conference,” giving a speech in her capacity as the Honorary President of the Royal Norfolk Agricultural Association.

    Image

    Hard to imagine Meghan slogging around in the mud in sturdy boots, wandering through the livestock pens, for the benefit of British farmers rather than herself.  

    • #24
  25. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    She: Harry’s mental trauma when, at the age of 28, he moved out of Clarence House (his father’s residence), only to return at some point to discover that Camilla had turned his bedroom into her dressing room.  “I tried not to care.  But especially the first time I saw it, I cared.” 

    I laughed aloud at this. Converting a child’s bedroom to another use is a rather common experience for American young adults. 

    Mrs. Tabby with great restraint waited until after we drove our daughter (then age 22) and her stuff to her new apartment several states away before ordering Mrs. Tabby’s dream furniture to turn our daughter’s former room into a sewing room for Mrs. Tabby’s quilting. Mrs. Tabby had wanted to order it earlier, but was concerned that the new furniture might arrive before we had returned from the moving trip. 

    Our daughter’s roommate’s parents had immediately turned her former bedroom into her father’s long-desired television room. 

    While setting up the new sewing room we read of another set of parents who knocked down the wall between the primary bedroom and what had been their daughter’s bedroom to form a sitting area in a primary bedroom suite, so that the daughter returned to find her former bedroom had been completely eliminated. 

    At the time I think one of the big home improvement stores ran a series of ads based on the premise that as soon as the kid’s out of the driveway, repurposing his or her room begins. 

    Our son knew for many years of my intent to turn his bedroom into my study when he left (the room had great windows on two sides). 

    I know some parents want to leave their children’s rooms exactly as it was when the child lived at home, but changing the room is not unusual. 

    We now live in a different house than we did when the children lived at home, but now when they come for a visit, the GRANDCHILDREN stay in the guest room, and our own children get shipped off to a hotel. So they can really feel put out. (:

    • #25
  26. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    The House of Windsor had more than it’s share of drama already. There was no need to import more.

    • #26
  27. Acook Coolidge
    Acook
    @Acook

    I’ve always wondered why the tabloids haven’t tried to prove with DNA who Harry’s father is or is not. Movies and TV make it seem easy come by DNA through glasses, cigarettes or whatever. Harry, Charles and the guy they think might be his father have been out and about in public for years. Seems like this could have been done. 

    • #27
  28. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    I have wondered where Harry is getting advice.

    When he and Ms. Markle first tried to set up a “brand” for their “independent” status immediately after their marriage, they did not take some of the most basic steps to protect that “brand,” causing them to lose some legal rights and undermining their whole purported enterprise. They clearly did not get competent legal or business advice on their branding effort. (I have some professional experience with the legal aspects of brand protection, and so was curious at the time about what they were trying to do.)

    I like a line from one commenter, something like, “For someone who claims he wants to restore his relationship with his father and brother, he has a curious way of showing it.” 

    Who is advising them? Whomever it is is doing a terrible job, and seems to be causing Harry more harm than good. 

    • #28
  29. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    She (View Comment):

    There’s a terrific essay today in, of all places, The New York Times, by, of all people, Ron and Nancy’s daughter, Patti Davis. Titled Prince Harry and the Value of Silence, it may be behind the paywall. In it, she describes apologizing to her father, while he was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, for an autobiography she’d written some years earlier–and which she now openly says she regrets writing–in which she’d had a similar sort of “ventfest” as Harry is having now.

    She touches on the unpredictability of time and life, and of the “gift” of time she had with her father, and of the opportunity she had to make things right with him before he died. And that we don’t always get that opportunity.

    King Charles’s words [“Please, boys, don’t make my final years a misery”] reveal a man who is aware of his mortality and who would like his offspring to be aware of it as well.

    I’ve learned something else about truth: Not every truth has to be told to the entire world…Not everything needs to be shared, a truth that silence can teach. Harry seems to have operated on the dictum that “Silence is not an option.” I would, respectfully, suggest to him that it is.

    Well Patti just rachetted up a notch on the respect scale.

    • #29
  30. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    I think that Prince Harry needs some help, and he’s not going to find the help he needs from some of the aimless, and unanchored celebrities that surround him and Meghan. Meghan might need some help herself.

    No one in their circle wants him to get better.  That would end the gravy train they are riding.  

    • #30
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