EV Schadenfreude

 

If you would rather spend your vacation hunting for charging stations, calling customer support to try to get them to reset the charging stations, hunting for places to spend the night when your Ford Lightning runs of out charge and has to be towed, or trying to figure out why a fast charger is only giving you a trickle charge, than attending a car show in Colorado, an electric vehicle is for you!

.

Published in Environment
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  1. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    We heard a nightmare story of a couple with a Tesla in this cold weather. Aside from a lack of charging stations, short duration of the charge, and parts failure, it was a piece of cake. No way, Jose!

    • #1
  2. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Can we move a lot of voters over the next two years with personal experiences like this and their communicating their great experiences?

    • #2
  3. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Can we move a lot of voters over the next two years with personal experiences like this and their communicating their great experiences?

    You want the pessimist answer?

    • #3
  4. EDISONPARKS Member
    EDISONPARKS
    @user_54742

    Abandoning a proven technology(ie: the internal combustion engine) which took years to develop and continually improves in every way, for a new unproven EV which will take years to work out the technological kinks, unknown unintended problems, is hubris …. 

    The EV can work well enough for local use when the EV user has the capacity to home charge the EV (ie: a personal garage with EV charging capacity) …. other than the local use self charging capability scenario ….  the EV will be a problem.

    • #4
  5. Kevin Schulte Member
    Kevin Schulte
    @KevinSchulte

    Ask me why my “told you so self” is grinning . 

    • #5
  6. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Kinda sweet gig, though.  People who get a lot of views on youtube can get a surprising amount of $ for it.  They might have bought the EV and the trailer with Youtube Bucks.

    • #6
  7. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Oh, and people who think it’s important to only buy and use electric vehicles should only be allowed to call electric tow trucks.

     

    • #7
  8. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Can we move a lot of voters over the next two years with personal experiences like this and their communicating their great experiences?

    I watched several EV-disaster videos, and none of the owners seemed phased by the problems. They don’t seem to connect the dots that jumping headlong into this new and untested technology might lead to problems. And none of them questioned where the electricity came from before it got into that charger, that maybe it was generated by burning fossil fuels. I’m not optimistic about moving many of them back to rationality.

    • #8
  9. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Can we move a lot of voters over the next two years with personal experiences like this and their communicating their great experiences?

    I watched several EV-disaster videos, and none of the owners seemed phased by the problems. They don’t seem to connect the dots that jumping headlong into this new and untested technology might lead to problems. And none of them questioned where the electricity came from before it got into that charger, that maybe it was generated by burning fossil fuels. I’m not optimistic about moving many of them back to rationality.

    Sounds like another situation where you can’t use reason, because they didn’t get there with reason.

    • #9
  10. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    I can understand buying a budget car that is electric.  You’ve got a primary car with a conventional powertrain, this is just a second car for running back and forth to work or school.  You’re never going to drive more than a hundred miles in a day with this second car, so you can always plug it in overnight and you’re good.  I do not understand spending $50-100K for a vehicle that has such limited utility.

    • #10
  11. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Steve Fast (View Comment):
    I watched several EV-disaster videos, and none of the owners seemed phased by the problems. They don’t seem to connect the dots that jumping headlong into this new and untested technology might lead to problems.

    It’s called living in denial. There seems to be a lot of that going on in recent years.

    • #11
  12. David C. Broussard Coolidge
    David C. Broussard
    @Dbroussa

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well. 

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps. 

    • #12
  13. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    We must have the dumbest generations of Americans voting than ever before in America if they cannot absorb an understanding that today’s government actions are leading us to economic disaster. We are cutting off our ability to supply the required energy to the production and delivery infrastructure for America. It comes gradually and then suddenly, like death.

    • #13
  14. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    • #14
  15. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    The early gasoline automobiles were a lot less reliable than a horse, and remained so for many years. They were playthings for wealthy people enamored with the new technology and willing to put up with the limitations of these new technology vehicles. One limitation was the unavailability of gasoline anywhere and everywhere hay was available.  

    • #15
  16. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    I can understand buying a budget car that is electric. You’ve got a primary car with a conventional powertrain, this is just a second car for running back and forth to work or school. You’re never going to drive more than a hundred miles in a day with this second car, so you can always plug it in overnight and you’re good. I do not understand spending $50-100K for a vehicle that has such limited utility.

    The one I fooled around with for a while, back in the 80s, was pretty cheap, used, as I recall.

     

    ????????????????????????????????????????????????????

    • #16
  17. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    The early gasoline automobiles were a lot less reliable than a horse, and remained so for many years. They were playthings for wealthy people enamored with the new technology and willing to put up with the limitations of these new technology vehicles. One limitation was the unavailability of gasoline anywhere and everywhere hay was available.

    But gasoline was available everywhere – you filled a can and tied it to the back bumper.  Gasoline and diesel are easily transportable while the electrical charging infrastructure is not.

    • #17
  18. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    I was also surprised how many of the charging stations that EV owners encountered worked poorly or not at all. Some had been broken for months. Others delivered a trickle charge when they were expecting a super charge. Some oscillated between a fast charge and a trickle for reasons unclear. I’m curious if anyone knows why it is so difficult to keep the chargers operating properly?

    • #18
  19. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    I was also surprised how many of the charging stations that EV owners encountered worked poorly or not at all. Some had been broken for months. Others delivered a trickle charge when they were expecting a super charge. Some oscillated between a fast charge and a trickle for reasons unclear. I’m curious if anyone knows why it is so difficult to keep the chargers operating properly?

    There are various issues, but one thing I read is that many of the chargers don’t have a full-capacity electrical supply, often because that would overstrain the grid at their location.  So they have a local battery that charges more slowly and can then deliver a fast charge to a connected vehicle.  Maybe just ONCE.  So if you’re the second customer at that charger, you get a much slower charge.

    Of course all the charging and discharging of another battery, with the additional losses, further lowers the overall efficiency of the EV scheme.  Combined with that it’s likely coming from a fossil fuel power plant to start with.

     

    • #19
  20. David C. Broussard Coolidge
    David C. Broussard
    @Dbroussa

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    The early gasoline automobiles were a lot less reliable than a horse, and remained so for many years. They were playthings for wealthy people enamored with the new technology and willing to put up with the limitations of these new technology vehicles. One limitation was the unavailability of gasoline anywhere and everywhere hay was available.

    But gasoline was available everywhere – you filled a can and tied it to the back bumper. Gasoline and diesel are easily transportable while the electrical charging infrastructure is not.

    Gasoline wasn’t available everywhere in the beginning. It’s took years for it to become even slightly common. 

    • #20
  21. Phil Turmel Coolidge
    Phil Turmel
    @PhilTurmel

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    The early gasoline automobiles were a lot less reliable than a horse, and remained so for many years. They were playthings for wealthy people enamored with the new technology and willing to put up with the limitations of these new technology vehicles. One limitation was the unavailability of gasoline anywhere and everywhere hay was available.

    But gasoline was available everywhere – you filled a can and tied it to the back bumper. Gasoline and diesel are easily transportable while the electrical charging infrastructure is not.

    Gasoline wasn’t available everywhere in the beginning. It’s took years for it to become even slightly common.

    It was sold in hardware stores before demand drove the creation of dedicated fueling stations.  So, while high-volume supplies took time to develop, it was indeed commonly available.

    EV’s are a cluster-[expletive] of epic proportions, driven by scientific ignorance, ignorance aided and abetted by politics.

    • #21
  22. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    Phil Turmel (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    The good thing was that when automobiles started becoming somewhat common, California and wannabe Californias didn’t set a deadline for outlawing the sale of horses and wagons.

    The early gasoline automobiles were a lot less reliable than a horse, and remained so for many years. They were playthings for wealthy people enamored with the new technology and willing to put up with the limitations of these new technology vehicles. One limitation was the unavailability of gasoline anywhere and everywhere hay was available.

    But gasoline was available everywhere – you filled a can and tied it to the back bumper. Gasoline and diesel are easily transportable while the electrical charging infrastructure is not.

    Gasoline wasn’t available everywhere in the beginning. It’s took years for it to become even slightly common.

    It was sold in hardware stores before demand drove the creation of dedicated fueling stations. So, while high-volume supplies took time to develop, it was indeed commonly available.

    EV’s are a cluster-[expletive] of epic proportions, driven by scientific ignorance, ignorance aided and abetted by politics.

    Here’s a brief history of the early sale of gasoline: http://www.petroleumhistory.org/OilHistory/pages/gasoline/stations.html

    • #22
  23. Michael G. Gallagher Coolidge
    Michael G. Gallagher
    @MichaelGallagher

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    • #23
  24. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Michael G. Gallagher (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @ Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    Except that, even then, you could put more gasoline in containers on the car.  Can’t do that with charging.

    • #24
  25. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Michael G. Gallagher (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @ Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    Except that, even then, you could put more gasoline in containers on the car. Can’t do that with charging.

    It is every American’s right to drive a toxic bomb that kills rescuers after a crash, and to haul about a large and incredibly heavy trailer full of even more batteries, and to post unarmed guards each time you go to the store to prevent the thing from being dragged away.

    • #25
  26. David C. Broussard Coolidge
    David C. Broussard
    @Dbroussa

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Michael G. Gallagher (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @ Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    Except that, even then, you could put more gasoline in containers on the car. Can’t do that with charging.

    Well. Technically you can carry extra batteries. 

    • #26
  27. Sisyphus Member
    Sisyphus
    @Sisyphus

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Michael G. Gallagher (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @ Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    Except that, even then, you could put more gasoline in containers on the car. Can’t do that with charging.

    Welcome to the MichaelBayVerse. Don’t neglect to yield right of way.

    • #27
  28. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Michael G. Gallagher (View Comment):

    David C. Broussard (View Comment):

    Elon Musk and Tesla get this. They built a network of charging stations so that when you plan a route, it builds in the stops for charging into the trip and the time required at each stop. Where the other manufacturers are falling short is on relying on private charging stations to pop up while the number of EVs are still low. I remember a dramatized interview with Thomas Edison that inventing the light bulb also meant having to deliver electricity and developing that infrastructure as well. We are still in early days of EV infrastructure and even more so for Hydrogen fuel cells. It’s not dissimilar to when automobiles first appeared and you had to be a mechanic to fix it yourself and if traveling a long way, took your own gasoline as well.

    EVs are fine city vehicles, but taking them on a long trip isn’t a great idea right now. It might be in 5-10 years when charging stations become ubiquitous. Heck, an enterprising company might install rapid charges at every Circle K, or 7-11 and over time the gas pumps might go the way of the unleaded pumps.

    Dear @ Debroussa,

    Your comments about electric cars are right on the money. Modern EVs are still a relatively new technology. After all, it’s only been 13 years since the first Tesla EV rolled off the assembly. That means modern EVS are going to be subject to all the glitches that accompany the introduction of new technology. Carl Benz put the very first car, his Patent Motor Car, No 1, on the road in 1886, but it wasn’t until 1908 that the first truly practical car, Ford’s Model hit the road and it wasn’t until the late 1920s that America could be called a nation on wheels. Drivers searching for the first gas pumps probably had the same anxieties that today’s EV owners have while looking for a charging station.

    Except that, even then, you could put more gasoline in containers on the car. Can’t do that with charging.

    Well. Technically you can carry extra batteries.

    I can lift another 100 miles of travel into my vehicle and set it down without a sound (no clunks, no groans!).  Try that with batteries.

    • #28
  29. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Can we move a lot of voters over the next two years with personal experiences like this and their communicating their great experiences?

    I watched several EV-disaster videos, and none of the owners seemed phased by the problems. They don’t seem to connect the dots that jumping headlong into this new and untested technology might lead to problems. And none of them questioned where the electricity came from before it got into that charger, that maybe it was generated by burning fossil fuels. I’m not optimistic about moving many of them back to rationality.

    We don’t need everyone, just a working majority.  

    • #29
  30. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    The sad thing is, hybrid technology that combines gasoline with “free energy” techniques has proven to be very beneficial. Our “experts” refuse to admit this and instead insist on “all EV.”

    Take my Toyota Prius as the example of hybrid energy.

    It was purchased in 2014, and was already 5 years old.

    Had we not just been  establishing our credit after a medical bankruptcy,  we would most likely have been approved for a slightly  more expensive hybrid SUV by Ford, which operates along the same lines as the Prius. (Or so I have been told.) This is the route to take for families who need more room than a compact-sized  car like ours.

    A Toyota Corolla would have gotten some 34 mpg. But the Prius brings its owner to the 43.3 mpg rating – which is a significant change overall.

    How does the Prius operate to bring about such savings? It uses traditional starting method of gasoline-operated engine. But once driving down the road, it converts the movement of all related parts into energy.  I think IIRC even the rotation of the tires ends up converted into energy.

    So it is not really “free energy” out of thin air but energy we normally dismiss as not being important.

    Oh but the costs of the batteries!

    Yes we heard that from some doom and gloom types. But until 2019 or so, the only repair items facing us were the usual oil changes, plus cost of new tires and brake pads. (If you live in hill country with windy twisty roads, tires and brakes are almost yearly expenditures.)

    Then late in December of that year, the car wouldn’t start. Even the jump assistance provided by Triple A didn’t help.

    Luckily it was the secondary battery. So it cost about $ 450 to replace. (With the main battery, it might have been 2,200 or so.)

    We actually have had more problems with the hatchback latches to get to the trunk  than with the batteries.

    Over the last few years, that has proven to be a money pit, far more expensive than it should be. (Maybe another 400 bucks?)  And yet once again, the latch is getting tricky.

    • #30
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