Another Retail Invasion Fails

 

Lowe’s has surrendered in the retail battle for Canada’s hardware soul. Much like the $2.1 billion beating that Target took in 2015. Lowe’s has sold its Canadian operations for $400 million to a Wall Street private equity group. Lowe’s entered the treacherous waters of Canadian retail in 2016 with the $2.4 billion purchase of Rona. (A large independent retailer of lumber, construction materials, and related hardware).

Why do American retailers fail here? Do executives get off the plane, see McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King, notice no language barrier, and start making incorrect cultural assumptions that drive their Canadian subsidiary to ruins?

The sad tale of corporate incompetence that once was Target Canada has made for several interesting books and business-school case studies. Mostly blaming the consultants (SAP) who created an inventory system that couldn’t function with bilingualism, metric, or dollar conversions. It was a train wreck of epic proportions, but management was undeterred to opening 133 large store locations with the unproven inventory system.

It’ll be interesting to see what went wrong with Lowe’s that caused them to throw in the towel after five years. (The outlook for the Canadian economy probably was a factor in forcing the timing on this as well)

The official reporting from the Financial Post.

Published in Business
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  1. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Is a 2 x 4 even a 2 x 4 in Canada?

    • #1
  2. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    And from what I read, home-ownership in Canada is declining.  Renters don’t usually do a lot of home-improvement, so maybe that’s part of it too.

    In a declining market, Rona might have gone under too.  Heck, that could even explain why they sold out.

    • #2
  3. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Is a 2 x 4 even a 2 x 4 in Canada?

    Yes. Most softwood lumber made in Canada is exported to the United States, it would cost too much to retool saw mills to metric – So we still have 2x4s, 4×8 sheets of plywood etc.

    • #3
  4. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Is a 2 x 4 even a 2 x 4 in Canada?

    Yes. Most softwood lumber made in Canada is exported to the United States, it would cost too much to retool saw mills to metric – So we still have 2x4s, 4×8 sheets of plywood etc.

    In other words, no. 😜

    • #4
  5. Dotorimuk Coolidge
    Dotorimuk
    @Dotorimuk

    Wal-Mart opened a few stores here in Korea in the ‘90s, but they ended up selling off to a big Korean company and splitting in 2006 or so. Guess they didn’t research the market sufficiently.

     

    • #5
  6. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Is a 2 x 4 even a 2 x 4 in Canada?

    Yes. Most softwood lumber made in Canada is exported to the United States, it would cost too much to retool saw mills to metric – So we still have 2x4s, 4×8 sheets of plywood etc.

    In other words, no. 😜

    Yes and no. 

    A 2 X 4 isn’t 2 X 4.  But a 4 X 8 is actually still 4 X 8.

    Thinner and thinner, yes, and more and more voids and plugs. But still 4 X 8.

    • #6
  7. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    I am not from Canada, Our Neighbor to the North, so take my business advice with a grain of salt eh?

    But I did spend quite a few months in Canada, Our Neighbor to the North, and just based on my personal experience, if I were going to open a store there, I would never try to sell PVC pipe, or drywall screws or any of that stuff.

    I would sell beer and donuts.

    • #7
  8. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    • #8
  9. The Great Adventure Coolidge
    The Great Adventure
    @TGA

    The OP leaves out one crucial factor that I think is often overlooked in the US – the absolutely bat-guano crazy bureaucracy of the Canadian government.  Everything must have both French and English on the label.  Unless, of course, you are producing something in Quebec in which case French only is fine.  All school children in English speaking areas have to take French.  But in Quebec, everything is in French and studying English is not mandatory.

    I have a personal favorite example that doesn’t involve language.  The example is admittedly aging, but still illustrative.  I graduated from HS up there in 1977.  Just before I left to head to the US for college, they switched all of the road speed signs over to metric.  On the highway the speed limit was no longer 55, it was now 90!  Yippee!  Not so much.  Within a year gas stations were selling by the liter.  Oh!  Sorry – litre. 

    Fast forward to 2002 – 25 years  later.  I’m working with a client in Winnipeg.  My profession is a logistics systems consultant, and I was helping the client implement a transportation management system (TMS).  We configured the system in kilometers, kilograms, all things metric.  When we got to developing reports, we hit a snag.  They had to report their fuel consumption metrics to the Canadian Government.  We had a database  that could pull information from the TMS and their fuel system.  So simple, right?  You pull the kilometers traveled for a given period of time, divide it by the litres of fuel, and voila, you have fuel consumption!

    Not so much.  The government had not yet switched their systems over to metric.  So the report had to convert kilometers to miles and litres to gallons (Imperial) for an  mpg number before they could submit it.

    Maybe the gov’t has figured it out by now, but I wouldn’t hold my breath.  

    At the very least I would say that any US company wanting to do business in Canada should invest in knowledgeable Canadian business resources to advise them, giving those resources substantial  decision making powers.

    • #9
  10. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right.  I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it.  I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    • #10
  11. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right. I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it. I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    Where I am, they are North, East, and South of me. But our Southern Border with Canada is closest.

    • #11
  12. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right. I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it. I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    Where I am, they are North, East, and South of me. But our Southern Border with Canada is closest.

    You think you got problems.  Ask Flicker what it’s like not to have ANY borders with Canada.  Or anyplace else. 

    • #12
  13. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Dotorimuk (View Comment):
    Wal-Mart opened a few stores here in Korea in the ‘90s, but they ended up selling off to a big Korean company and splitting in 2006 or so. Guess they didn’t research the market sufficiently.

     My mate’s MBA thesis was an analysis of why Wal-Mart failed in Korea. And it amounted to a misunderstanding of the culture.

    • Koreans don’t like barebones shopping environments. They prefer stores to have personality and charm and place a high value on customer service.
    • Koreans have a culture of localism; they prefer products tied to the local culture, not generic low-cost goods. They also prefer to shop in their own neighborhoods.
    • Like other context cultures, they see low prices as a mark of poor quality.
    • #13
  14. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    • #14
  15. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    The Great Adventure (View Comment):
    The OP leaves out one crucial factor that I think is often overlooked in the US – the absolutely bat-guano crazy bureaucracy of the Canadian government.  Everything must have both French and English on the label.  Unless, of course, you are producing something in Quebec in which case French only is fine.  All school children in English speaking areas have to take French.  But in Quebec, everything is in French and studying English is not mandatory.

    No, I didnt leave it out. I was relaying the simple facts of what had occurred – I wanted to discuss with y’all why it occurred.

    Also, I am not really sure the bat guano was really a factor, 1) large corporations prefer extra layers of bat guano, because it reduces competitions from smaller and start up firms. 2) They should have noticed the bat guano when they were doing the take overs or the due diligence on the deals in the first place. IF it was a limiting factor it would have prevented the deals. 3) The bat guano invites corruption. I am sure they ‘negotiated’ with multiple levels of government to smooth a lot of that out for the investment, jobs and grand openings in their communities… To get the political windfalls of the illusion of growth. 

    Also, Miles per gallon is still the most widely used and discussed metric for measuring fuel efficiency.  The Liters per 100Km is far less popular. I think mostly because its a psychological thing, bigger numbers are better. For example my car reports that it gets 6.1 L/100 KM – which is 38.5 MPG (US) or 46.3 (UK)…. With the proximity and market dominance of American auto industry the US gallon has displaced the Imperial gallon. (the big 3 auto makers have a larger market share in Canada, than they do in the US)

    Its funny, I had an argument one time with a co-worker about European cars being so much more fuel efficient than the American models of the same car.  I noticed that the English language version of the website had the UK flag on the language selection wheel – I suggested that the difference in the fuel economies being reported were caused by US vs Imp gallons… Which after he did some googling on his own – realized this was true… and solved his envy of European cars.  (other than they where just prettier)

    • #15
  16. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    • #16
  17. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio.  Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how.  On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that.   On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity.  Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos.  There may be some local regulations about the beer.  I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    • #17
  18. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio. Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how. On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that. On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity. Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos. There may be some local regulations about the beer. I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    I remember Wing Stop restaurants in Phoenix having a wide selection of beers, and possibly small-bottle wines too.

    • #18
  19. Dotorimuk Coolidge
    Dotorimuk
    @Dotorimuk

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    Dotorimuk (View Comment):
    Wal-Mart opened a few stores here in Korea in the ‘90s, but they ended up selling off to a big Korean company and splitting in 2006 or so. Guess they didn’t research the market sufficiently.

    My mate’s MBA thesis was an analysis of why Wal-Mart failed in Korea. And it amounted to a misunderstanding of the culture.

    • Koreans don’t like barebones shopping environments. They prefer stores to have personality and charm and place a high value on customer service.
    • Koreans have a culture of localism; they prefer products tied to the local culture, not generic low-cost goods. They also prefer to shop in their own neighborhoods.
    • Like other context cultures, they see low prices as a mark of poor quality.

    The Japanese “dollar store” Daiso has done well here.

    • #19
  20. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio. Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how. On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that. On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity. Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos. There may be some local regulations about the beer. I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    The media has noticed the decline in Tim Hortons as well:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/09/tim-hortons-canada-coffee-brand-popularity-downfall

    I think restaurants is one of those few industries left that a small business can compete with the conglomerates. 

    If I were to open a restaurant, I dont think I would have a liquor license, as it gives the local government more leverage on your business. I would absolutely have a delivery friendly concept (like pizza) and a walk up or drive through service – maybe not even have a dining room… (Considering all the closures forced by the government mismanagement of the pandemic)

    • #20
  21. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio. Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how. On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that. On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity. Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos. There may be some local regulations about the beer. I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    The media has noticed the decline in Tim Hortons as well:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/09/tim-hortons-canada-coffee-brand-popularity-downfall

    I think restaurants is one of those few industries left that a small business can compete with the conglomerates.

    If I were to open a restaurant, I dont think I would have a liquor license, as it gives the local government more leverage on your business. I would absolutely have a delivery friendly concept (like pizza) and a walk up or drive through service – maybe not even have a dining room… (Considering all the closures forced by the government mismanagement of the pandemic)

    When many places were shut down partially or completely, the closest Domino’s only had online or phone ordering and “curb-side” pickup.

    The Pizza Hut practially next door had in-person ordering and pickup, as well as delivery, and they re-opened their dining area as quickly as they could.

    I always went to Pizza Hut.

    • #21
  22. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    kedavis (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio. Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how. On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that. On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity. Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos. There may be some local regulations about the beer. I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    I remember Wing Stop restaurants in Phoenix having a wide selection of beers, and possibly small-bottle wines too.

    Are those considered fast-food establishments?  (There are some Rubios in Arizona, but I don’t know about the beer there.)

    • #22
  23. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    I would sell beer and donuts

    To compete with Tim Hortons? (A deficiency of Tim Hortons is that there is no beer. But there is a fast food outlet in California where you can get a beer to go with your fish tacos.)

    That’s actually pretty do-able right now.

    Now that Tim Hortons is part of a multi-national conglomerate (from Brazil I think) the quality of the food has really declined. I would much rather have a Subway sandwich over a Tim Hortons sandwich any day of the week.

    I don’t do Tim Hortons too often, but there are quite a few of them here in Michigan, especially on the east side of the state, i.e. not near my home. And there are some in Ohio. Tim Hortons is very different from the stores of 25-30 years ago, but it is hard for me to remember just how. On a recent bike ride up the east side of Michigan I got lunch at a few and preferred it to McD or anything like that. On the same ride (of about 1750 miles total) we stopped at a lot of Subways for our evening meal, as we both have recently come to prefer that to restaurants except on rare occasions. I’d still take a Tim Hortons over Subway just for a change and the coffee, but that’s a relatively rare opportunity. Subway meets my wife’s dietary requirements a lot better.

    When we are in the San Diego area we like to stop at Rubios, where I like to get a Corona with my fish tacos. There may be some local regulations about the beer. I don’t know if it would be doable in a fast food place in Canada, but it is a good idea.

     

    I remember Wing Stop restaurants in Phoenix having a wide selection of beers, and possibly small-bottle wines too.

    Are those considered fast-food establishments? (There are some Rubios in Arizona, but I don’t know about the beer there.)

    They would be considered fast food I suppose, because they don’t serve steaks etc.  They have indoor seating, as well as doing takeout and delivery (but no delivery on beer, I suppose) but so do McDonald’s and Burger King.

    • #23
  24. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right. I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it. I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    Where I am, they are North, East, and South of me. But our Southern Border with Canada is closest.

    You think you got problems. Ask Flicker what it’s like not to have ANY borders with Canada. Or anyplace else.

    Yes, I’m one of those who live in tomorrow, where the boundaries are only temporal.

    • #24
  25. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte
    @Charlotte

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    The Liters per 100Km is far less popular.

    Why wouldn’t it be kilometers per litre, as a direct analog to MPG?

    • #25
  26. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right. I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it. I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    Where I am, they are North, East, and South of me. But our Southern Border with Canada is closest.

    You think you got problems. Ask Flicker what it’s like not to have ANY borders with Canada. Or anyplace else.

    Yes, I’m one of those who live in tomorrow, where the boundaries are only temporal.

    How did you get through the  temporal boundary to get to tomorrow, then?   Did you have to show an ID? 

    • #26
  27. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    The Liters per 100Km is far less popular.

    Why wouldn’t it be kilometers per litre, as a direct analog to MPG?

    Canadians and governments are involved.

    • #27
  28. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte
    @Charlotte

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    The Liters per 100Km is far less popular.

    Why wouldn’t it be kilometers per litre, as a direct analog to MPG?

    Canadians and governments are involved.

    Fair point.

    • #28
  29. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):
    Our Neighbor to the North

    Or South.

    I don’t know if that is right. I would wait till I hear what 3 Year Letterman says about it. I suspect that he will say that anyone who thinks that doesn’t know his geography, which country is the greatest country the world has ever seen, which is the first democracy in the world, etc.

    (I deliberately chose the accepted words “Our” and “North” hoping get a little heated controversy going, which we so badly need in today’s undivided country (the US).)

    Where I am, they are North, East, and South of me. But our Southern Border with Canada is closest.

    You think you got problems. Ask Flicker what it’s like not to have ANY borders with Canada. Or anyplace else.

    Yes, I’m one of those who live in tomorrow, where the boundaries are only temporal.

    How did you get through the temporal boundary to get to tomorrow, then? Did you have to show an ID?

    IDs are so yesterday.

    • #29
  30. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Flicker (View Comment):
    IDs are so yesterday.

    Women and minorities hardest hit.

    • #30
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