Quote of the Day: The Educational Benefits of Diversity

 

MR. PARK: Diversity is our nation’s greatest source of strength, but as our Reconstruction founders understood and our nation’s history confirms, it also poses unique challenges to the American experiment. We live in a large and sometimes unwieldy democracy, and for that democracy to flourish, people of all different backgrounds and perspectives have to learn to live together and unite in common purpose….

JUSTICE THOMAS: Mr. Park, I’ve heard the word “diversity” quite a few times, and I don’t have a clue what it means.…I’d like you to give us a specific definition of diversity in the context of the University of North Carolina. And I’d also like you to give us a clear idea of exactly what the educational benefits of diversity at the University of North Carolina would be.

MR. PARK: …And so we value diversity of all different kinds in all the ways that people differ in our society. On — on the educational benefits question, Your Honor, I don’t think it’s actually disputed here that there are real and meaningful educational benefits that come with diversity of all kinds. SFFA’s own expert…conceded and agreed enthusiastically, in fact, on the stand that a racially diverse and a diverse — diversity of all kinds leads to “a deeper and richer learning environment,” leads to more creative thinking and exchange of ideas, and, critically, reduced bias between people of different backgrounds and not solely for racial backgrounds.

JUSTICE THOMAS: But you still haven’t given me the educational benefits…

MR. PARK: …I would direct the Court to the Major American Businesses brief, which discussesa whole extensive, rigorous peer-reviewed literature that diverse groups of people actually perform at a higher level. So the most concrete possible scenario is — is stock trading, and there are studies that find that racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions. And the mechanism there is that it reduces group think and people have longer and more sustained disagreement, and that leads to a more efficient outcome.

– From the oral argument of Ryan Y. Park on behalf of the University Respondents in Students for Fair Admissions Inc. (SFFA) v. University of North Carolina, starting on page 69 of the oral argument transcript.

Is there any statement more demonstrative of groupthink on university campuses than the claim that “diversity is our nation’s greatest strength?” Mr. Park thinks it such a strong foundation for his argument that he leads with it. And yet Justice Thomas immediately illuminates the cracks in that foundation by noting the absence of any concrete definition of the term “diversity.” If I could have followed Justice Thomas in questioning Mr. Park, I would have asked whether the University of North Carolina (UNC) actually believes any of his arguments about aiming for more creative thinking, the exchange of ideas, and reduced groupthink. 

I don’t want to pick on UNC, and I think I am fairly safe in attributing its arguments to most other highly selective public and private universities in the United States. Strategically, SFFA has brought lawsuits against Harvard and UNC to challenge the use of affirmative action at private institutions of higher learning under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as well as at public institutions under Title VI and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.*

We’re all well aware that college admissions commonly rely on vague goals of diversity to justify their use of race in admissions decisions. In addition, UNC and many other colleges require faculty and students to complete diversity, equity, and inclusion training. If a student or faculty member makes it onto any campus without having fully committed to the DEI worldview, then most universities today will make every effort to ensure that unbelievers are brought into alignment with the “correct” ideas. DEI training efforts are so common that the website “Critical Race Training in Education” was created to track all such programs across the country. 

Returning to my doubt about Mr. Park’s and UNC’s good faith in arguing for a diverse kind of diversity, as opposed to simple racial diversity, I would ask whether DEI training programs could serve to undermine the professed goal of fostering diverse views and avoiding groupthink on campus. I believe I am correct in stating that the oral arguments did not address such an issue. The elevation of diversity as a primary institutional goal has largely demoted the original missions of these schools to the extent that it is only logical to question their educational benefits. Universities – as the word “university” suggests – were founded to be wholly dedicated to the pursuit of one thing, i.e., truth, with the entire institution turned toward a single goal. Now these schools openly profess that they are made stronger by turning toward the goal of difference. Regardless of the legal requirements of the Civil Rights Act or the Constitution, the new mission of universities has the effect of discouraging applicants who don’t seek to be educated to think differently in exactly the same way.    

Since my oldest child is applying to colleges this fall, we have faced the dilemma of whether to apply to schools where the commitment to DEI is so intense as to be off-putting. Dartmouth was at the top of the list of colleges to which my daughter wanted to apply, until we attended a virtual information session a few months ago. The Zoom call started with an indigenous land acknowledgment and was immediately followed by a declaration that racism still exists and we all need to do more to make change. Of course, the admissions representatives had pronouns after their names. After those formalities were completed, the admissions team and a couple of students conducted the meeting normally. None of them seemed to ask whether they should encourage Dartmouth to simply dissolve and give back the land to the indigenous people who were wronged in 1769 by the college’s founding. None of them wondered whether their film classes focused on racism weren’t leading them to seek out racism where none actually exists. The “student of color” worried about lack of acceptance while touting the many organizations available to herself and other similar students. No one asked if the students at Dartmouth weren’t, in fact, members of a small club of the most privileged people ever to get a college degree, regardless of their race. After an hour of listening to those privileged students and smug gatekeepers, the only thing I wondered was why I would ever want to send my daughter (and my money) to Dartmouth for four years.**

* See Richard Epstein’s post “The Affirmative Action Showdown,” Feb. 2, 2022, for background.

** I am curious to know whether @peterrobinson would like to “acknowledge the colonial origin of Dartmouth College, founded for the education of Native American youth and occupying the lands of the Abenaki and other Algonquin peoples. All the work that takes place [there] rests on the forceful appropriation of their lands by European settlers.

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  1. Metalheaddoc Member
    Metalheaddoc
    @Metalheaddoc

    Yet somehow when the country was less diverse by UNC standards, we put a man on the moon. Massive world changing advances and inventions and prosperity occurred without a “sufficient” number of black lesbian engineers. It’s almost like science and techology don’t care about the color/identity of it’s creators. 

    • #1
  2. Doug Kimball Thatcher
    Doug Kimball
    @DougKimball

    Dartmouth, like all the Ivys, has a legacy.  Yes, it is a very priviledged place and always has been, educating the bright and most ambitious students, raising amazing funds from its alumni, but like any centuries old institution, it has reflected the ideas and customs of past generations.  But ideas and customs change, evolve and fall out of favor.  So the institution must genuflect, admit guilt and reform itself to conform to the latest norms of intellectual thought.  So out goes God, truth, objective measurement, conservatism and in comes progressivism; that is affirmative action, LBGTQ, Queer theory, social justice and equity, etc.  Tradition and conservatism are thought to be insular, intolerent and even, evil, in complete opposition to progressivism.  As an alum, I am ashamed.  And all the Ivies are the same in this trend; in fact they compete to see which is the most obnoxiously woke.

    • #2
  3. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    DIE in practice seems to be about upper middle-class cosmopolitan professionals who happen not to be white, male and heterosexual wanting a leg up.

    I mean, sure – whatever it takes to get ahead. But don’t pretend you’re doing anything for anyone who isn’t upper middle class, cosmopolitan and professional. 

    • #3
  4. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    My preferred nomenclature is Division, Exclusion, and Intolerance.

    Primary focus on “diversity” while appearing to define “diversity” according to narrow and in many cases superficial characteristics such as race is inherently divisive.

    Expecting people to sign on to or assent to particular statements of faith or ideology such as “We are using stolen land” or “America is inexorably racist” or “we must announce genders because there are more than two genders,” or even “diversity is our strength” before permitting those people to participate expresses intolerance of alternative views, and excludes those who might consider alternative views. In some cases (such as religious schools or other schools intentionally set up to teach students into a particular doctrine) there may be good reason for a school to insist faculty, staff, and students adhere to a particular statement of faith, but in doing so they recognize that certain views are not tolerated on campus, and that they are excluding people.

    • #4
  5. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    I too have wondered why more of these people and institutions with the “land acknowledgements” don’t act on their professed beliefs and deliver the land back to the people they perceive to be the rightful descendants of the people from whom the land was stolen. They of course will quickly discover that figuring that out is an impossible task, but that they don’t even try tells me they’re not serious about the “land acknowledgement.”

    Similarly, I wonder why the people who demand everyone cease using fossil fuels continue heating their houses or apartments or offices, continue commuting in cars and busses or bicycling on roads and paths paved with asphalt, etc. (and no fair using “wind” or “solar” energy that depend on windmills and solar panels made using fossil fuel). 

    • #5
  6. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Any expectation or preference for a statement of faith (“diversity is our strength,” “this land was stolen,” “America is inherently racist,” “there are more than two genders” before being allowed to participate in a group inevitably leads to “group think” that narrows the development of knowledge. 

    • #6
  7. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):
    I too have wondered why more of these people and institutions with the “land acknowledgements” don’t act on their professed beliefs and deliver the land back to the people they perceive to be the rightful descendants of the people from whom the land was stolen.

    Maybe they’re not lamenting the land’s appropriation but bragging.

    • #7
  8. Brian Clendinen Member
    Brian Clendinen
    @BrianClendinen

    I listen to most of this audio recording of this. It so bad on the Lawyer’s part. The NC State lawyer has to be one of the worse lawyers I have ever heard argue. Let alone arguing before the US supreme court.

    The most interesting that was not really anything new for me to discover but Kagan’s Racist rant/argument. I always knew she was a bigot but this just proved yet again how much of one she is.

    The interesting part Jackson might actually rule against it. Based on some of her questions. She seems to be much more on the fence than everyone else. So this could be a 7-2 decision.

    • #8
  9. Brian Clendinen Member
    Brian Clendinen
    @BrianClendinen

    Also listening. It sounds like they were really trying to be very careful at the langue they used. So meaningless empty junk words and talk that met nothing but propaganda talking points that you have no idea what it really means in practice. So to me they know they are breaking the law. So they only talk about generalities and high-level objectives. And try to completely avoid talking about any specifics. Not wanting to point out they don’t have a process. They have subjective Opinion selection criteria based on guidelines. Never once did I actually hear the lawyers break down a good summary of the process. So they don’t actually have a process that is repeatable that someone could be trained on it and get very similar results.

    • #9
  10. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Brian Clendinen (View Comment):

    Also listening. It sounds like they were really trying to be very careful at the langue they used. So meaningless empty junk words and talk that met nothing but propaganda talking points that you have no idea what it really means in practice. So to me they know they are breaking the law. So they only talk about generalities and high-level objectives. And try to completely avoid talking about any specifics. Not wanting to point out they don’t have a process. They have subjective Opinion selection criteria based on guidelines. Never once did I actually hear the lawyers break down a good summary of the process. So they don’t actually have a process that is repeatable that someone could be trained on it and get very similar results.

    I think you’re probably right about the strategy to reveal as little as possible. The NC lawyer had a tough assignment to defend a program that is designed, basically by muddled Supreme Court precedent, to be ill-defined. Still, he should have been better prepared to handle Thomas. Apparently, he clerked for Ginsburg and went to Harvard while Kagan was dean of the law school. He wrote for The Atlantic, if you’re interested in reading his own views really fleshed out. 

    • #10
  11. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Dartmouth, like all the Ivys, has a legacy. Yes, it is a very priviledged place and always has been, educating the bright and most ambitious students, raising amazing funds from its alumni, but like any centuries old institution, it has reflected the ideas and customs of past generations. But ideas and customs change, evolve and fall out of favor. So the institution must genuflect, admit guilt and reform itself to conform to the latest norms of intellectual thought. So out goes God, truth, objective measurement, conservatism and in comes progressivism; that is affirmative action, LBGTQ, Queer theory, social justice and equity, etc. Tradition and conservatism are thought to be insular, intolerent and even, evil, in complete opposition to progressivism. As an alum, I am ashamed. And all the Ivies are the same in this trend; in fact they compete to see which is the most obnoxiously woke.

    I’m sorry for alumni of these schools, including me (although I did not attend an Ivy). It makes me wonder whether these schools will see, or already have seen, a significant increase in applicants identifying as members of minority populations – no matter how tenuous the claims. 

    • #11
  12. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    The simple answer?  Send your kids to Hillsdale College. 

    • #12
  13. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    The simple answer? Send your kids to Hillsdale College.

    I wish it were that simple. We talked to a friend whose son just graduated from there, and he said there are pros and cons. But ultimately, it doesn’t have the right kind of program for her focus. 

    • #13
  14. Paul Stinchfield Member
    Paul Stinchfield
    @PaulStinchfield

    genferei (View Comment):

    DIE in practice seems to be about upper middle-class cosmopolitan professionals who happen not to be white, male and heterosexual wanting a leg up.

    I mean, sure – whatever it takes to get ahead. But don’t pretend you’re doing anything for anyone who isn’t upper middle class, cosmopolitan and professional.

    DIE is also a jobs program for white leftists of mediocre intelligence. Did you flunk algebra and chemistry? Too lazy study real history? Get a b***s*** degree in Grievance Studies and then get a job as a Diversity Dean, a DIE “training” zampolit, or an HR department commissar. You will be paid will, and you will be able to bully people more accomplished than you.

    • #14
  15. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Metalheaddoc (View Comment):

    Yet somehow when the country was less diverse by UNC standards, we put a man on the moon. Massive world changing advances and inventions and prosperity occurred without a “sufficient” number of black lesbian engineers. It’s almost like science and techology don’t care about the color/identity of it’s creators.

    “There is no “black mind” or “white mind”, no “white male of knowing”, there is only one truth, and we find it through the scientific method.”
    Gad Saad, The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense

    • #15
  16. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Oh, and the Abenaki tribe were some of the most aggressive in Colonial America.  Most other tribes feared them greatly.

    • #16
  17. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Dartmouth, like all the Ivys, has a legacy. Yes, it is a very priviledged place and always has been, educating the bright and most ambitious students, raising amazing funds from its alumni, but like any centuries old institution, it has reflected the ideas and customs of past generations. But ideas and customs change, evolve and fall out of favor. So the institution must genuflect, admit guilt and reform itself to conform to the latest norms of intellectual thought. So out goes God, truth, objective measurement, conservatism and in comes progressivism; that is affirmative action, LBGTQ, Queer theory, social justice and equity, etc. Tradition and conservatism are thought to be insular, intolerent and even, evil, in complete opposition to progressivism. As an alum, I am ashamed. And all the Ivies are the same in this trend; in fact they compete to see which is the most obnoxiously woke.

    I’m sorry for alumni of these schools, including me (although I did not attend an Ivy). It makes me wonder whether these schools will see, or already have seen, a significant increase in applicants identifying as members of minority populations – no matter how tenuous the claims.

    They already have plenty of faculty with dubious claims to a preferred minority status. 

    • #17
  18. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    “Diversity is our greatest strength” is such obvious hogwash. Unity under God is our greatest strength.

    • #18
  19. Steve Fast Coolidge
    Steve Fast
    @SteveFast

    Steve Fast (View Comment):

    “Diversity is our greatest strength” is such obvious hogwash. Unity under God is our greatest strength.

    Allow me to elaborate. Diversity is not necessarily a weakness, but it is certainly not our greatest strength. Diversity without an overriding national purpose easily leads to dissension. Just look at the many states around the world that have ethnic diversity and are riven by strife. But diversity that is unified under a God-given vision that every person is created in his image and equally valuable is a strength.

    Likewise, a deadening unity that destroys the individual and his value is also a weakness. Take the many authoritarian states that expend enormous resources forcibly unifying their peoples and constraining their God-given creativity.

    Thus “e pluribus unum” is one of our national mottoes. Bringing the many together under God gives a national purpose and creates a “one” that takes advantage of individual strengths and creativity to transform a nation and a continent and to become Liberty Enlightening the World.

    • #19
  20. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship?  Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    • #20
  21. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people. 

    • #21
  22. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    • #22
  23. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    In the stock trading example, it seems like an actually racially diverse group is being considered, but I don’t think that necessarily means that they always seek true racial diversity. I think they still mean that a person is “diverse” because he is a member of a URM. So the use of the word just doesn’t mean the same thing to all listeners. And this gets to their use of a term that sounds reasonable to many people of good will in order to mask the goal of just elevating all POCs and demoting whites. I just think they’re not being honest, and I wish your question had been posed to the attorneys for the universities. If something like it was asked, I missed it.

    • #23
  24. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    In the stock trading example, it seems like an actually racially diverse group is being considered, but I don’t think that necessarily means that they always seek true racial diversity. I think they still mean that a person is “diverse” because he is a member of a URM. So the use of the word just doesn’t mean the same thing to all listeners. And this gets to their use of a term that sounds reasonable to many people of good will in order to mask the goal of just elevating all POCs and demoting whites. I just think they’re not being honest, and I wish your question had been posed to the attorneys for the universities. If something like it was asked, I missed it.

    What is a URM and a POCs?

    • #24
  25. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    In the stock trading example, it seems like an actually racially diverse group is being considered, but I don’t think that necessarily means that they always seek true racial diversity. I think they still mean that a person is “diverse” because he is a member of a URM. So the use of the word just doesn’t mean the same thing to all listeners. And this gets to their use of a term that sounds reasonable to many people of good will in order to mask the goal of just elevating all POCs and demoting whites. I just think they’re not being honest, and I wish your question had been posed to the attorneys for the universities. If something like it was asked, I missed it.

    What is a URM and a POCs?

    URM is under-represented minorities.  POC is people of color.  Both terms are stupid.

    • #25
  26. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Here’s my take on the issue, from my personal blog over at RushBabe49.com

    https://rushbabe49.com/2021/04/20/diversity-divides/

     

    • #26
  27. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    In the stock trading example, it seems like an actually racially diverse group is being considered, but I don’t think that necessarily means that they always seek true racial diversity. I think they still mean that a person is “diverse” because he is a member of a URM. So the use of the word just doesn’t mean the same thing to all listeners. And this gets to their use of a term that sounds reasonable to many people of good will in order to mask the goal of just elevating all POCs and demoting whites. I just think they’re not being honest, and I wish your question had been posed to the attorneys for the universities. If something like it was asked, I missed it.

    What is a URM and a POCs?

    URM is under-represented minorities. POC is people of color. Both terms are stupid.

    Sorry, I had written out URM and then must have edited it out. I hate these terms, but that’s how they talk so I was trying to capture that perspective.

    • #27
  28. Lilly B Coolidge
    Lilly B
    @LillyB

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Here’s my take on the issue, from my personal blog over at RushBabe49.com

    https://rushbabe49.com/2021/04/20/diversity-divides/

     

    What a thorough consideration of the problem that “diversity” has become! Thanks for sharing!

    • #28
  29. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Here’s my take on the issue, from my personal blog over at RushBabe49.com

    https://rushbabe49.com/2021/04/20/diversity-divides/

     

    What a thorough consideration of the problem that “diversity” has become! Thanks for sharing!

    I’ve never been shy about shameless self-promotion when it comes to my blog.

    • #29
  30. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Lilly B (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    If racial diversity is such a strength, why do NBA teams with nearly 100% Black players usually win the championship? Shouldn’t the teams with a healthy mix of Asians, Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks be the victors?

    I think this is an example of “diversity” meaning different things to people with different world views. To traditionalists, diversity means that a variety of something is present. To progressives, diversity means the presence of people who are from “underrepresented minority” populations. So a class composed of “people of color” would be diverse even if it excludes “white” people.

    I used “racial diversity” specifically because that is what Mr. Parker cited when he said about stock traders “racially diverse groups of people making trading decisions perform at a higher level, make more efficient trading decisions.”

    In the stock trading example, it seems like an actually racially diverse group is being considered, but I don’t think that necessarily means that they always seek true racial diversity. I think they still mean that a person is “diverse” because he is a member of a URM. So the use of the word just doesn’t mean the same thing to all listeners. And this gets to their use of a term that sounds reasonable to many people of good will in order to mask the goal of just elevating all POCs and demoting whites. I just think they’re not being honest, and I wish your question had been posed to the attorneys for the universities. If something like it was asked, I missed it.

    What does honesty have to do with their testimony? 

    • #30
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