Good People Do Bad Things

 

I mentioned in a member’s feed post recently that an extremely close friend of mine had recently committed suicide after being accused of downloading child porn.  I mentioned this to one of my daughters, and she said, “Gosh – that seems impossible.  He seemed like such a good person.

Now, again, he’s one of my closest friends, so naturally I’ll tend to defend him.  But I strongly disagreed with her in principle, as well, so I responded with a “Dad lecture” that my kids are probably used to at this point:  “What?  You think that good people don’t do bad things?  Is that what you think?  So good people do good things and bad people do bad things?  That’s it?  Look – that’s just not how the world works, kiddo.  That’s why James Bond movies seem so ridiculous – that’s how they’re written, and it doesn’t seem real.  Because it’s not.  Human nature is not as simple as that.  That’s the whole point of the Bible.  We’re all sinners, just doing the best we can.  C’mon.  That’s why it’s so important to resist the temptation to judge those who sin differently than you do.  Leave that to God.  Us mortals are all just sinners, doing the best we can.

I could hear her eye roll over the phone.  But whatever.

Such simplistic views of human nature are dangerous.  Even when I was an idiot jock in college (back in the ’80s), I was struck by the left’s strategy of declaring white-on-black racism to be the ultimate evil.  Which means that blacks are incapable of evil.  And when they declare, “Let he who is without sin cast the first stone,” that means that all blacks can cast as many stones as they like.  This simple trick elevated a Democrat voter block to divine status and power.

And there was nothing that Republicans could do to combat this.  Absolutely nothing.

That was 35 years ago.  It’s gotten much worse now.  As you might expect.

Our kids learn in schools, and movies, and in news media, and social media, and so on, that bad people do bad things.  They don’t study the Bible and Shakespeare.  They read incendiary Twitter posts and watch James Bond movies.  Evil people doing evil things.  Good people doing good things.

Then, when news media, social media, etc., declare that any thoughts that don’t align with Democrat policy initiatives of the day are not just distasteful, but evil – that means that all Republicans are evil.  They’re saying evil things.  That makes them evil.  Obviously.

Then the kid thinks, why would you consider compromising with pure evil?  All you can get is half evil, then, and as a good person, you wouldn’t consider such a thing, of course.

So there is no limit to how viciously you can treat Republicans, or even insufficiently ideologically pure Democrats.  Up to and including social exclusion and violence.

There is a reason that political violence is a feature of the left, and not the right.

I’ve known my friend for over 20 years.  He’s a good person.  He did something horrible.  But he’s a good person.

It’s easy to judge him – he did something horrible.  But it’s a mistake to simply dismiss him as a bad person, while I am a good person.  Each of us needs to remember that we’re capable of horrible things, ourselves, under the right circumstances.  Dismissing bad deeds as simply the actions of bad people, unlike us – that’s a dangerous mistake.

This is the genius of Christianity.  We’re all God’s children.  We’re all sinners.  We have a lot in common – even with those with whom we disagree.  We should focus on all that we have in common.  And leave the rest up to God.

If we can’t see the good in people, even in those with whom we disagree, then our society will become more partisan, divided, and violent.

I would claim that this is a brilliant prediction.  Except it’s already happening.  Which downgrades it from a brilliant prediction, to an acknowledgment of the obvious.  Which seems less inspiring.

On the other hand, you won’t get such an acknowledgment from the news media, or anyone else on the left.  Because they want to leverage the social divisions they create to concentrate power on the left, and exclude those who take a different view from polite society.

When the news media sounds more like James Bond than Shakespeare, you know they’re up to something.  Such simplistic representations of human nature don’t even sound real, but they persist with portraying the whole world this way, and hoping that their audience can suspend their disbelief.

It would be easier to just acknowledge reality.  But they don’t.

We all need to remember that bad people are capable of good, just as we are capable of bad.  Losing track of this simple truth makes for intolerant, arrogant people, and divided, violent societies.

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  1. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    Watching child porn is bad, but it is worth keeping in mind that it is an order of magnitude less bad than having sex with children. 

    • #1
  2. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    I am – this is only tangentially related to the post- not likely to be convinced by arguments of Satanic influence, but it is uncanny how many religious qualities the left recycles while they reject religion as a whole. 

    • #2
  3. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Nobody thinks they are the bad guy.

    Well, almost nobody.

    • #3
  4. Peter Gøthgen Member
    Peter Gøthgen
    @PeterGothgen

    This is why I appreciate nuanced villains (Marvel is particularly good at that).  Many of the most interesting villains are the ones whose explanations have you on their side, right up to the point where they start killing people.

    In a more realistic note, I have become more and more convinced that those who are racists or bigots are people who have real problems in their lives, and have chosen an external group on which to focus their anger.  This is why Daryl Davis has been so successful.  He is an African-American who has a substantial collection (over 100) of KKK robes given to him by people who left the organization.  He treats people as human beings, even when they think of him as less than human, and listens to their problems.  By engaging, he brings them out.  

    This is why I don’t like the phrase “Hate has no home here.”  By focusing on rejection of ‘hate’, you allow yourself to reject people.  This in turn will only solidify to those people that others are against them.  The focus should instead be on building bridges.  Treat people like human beings, and eventually you’ll figure out that they are.

    • #4
  5. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    This is a very compassionate take.  For me, the matter is complicated by the “bad thing” at issue, but I certainly think that this person was fortunate to have you as a friend.

    Stay dry, Doc.

    • #5
  6. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    iWe (View Comment):

    Nobody thinks they are the bad guy.

    This is very true.  

    When I first started practicing law, I was asked by one of the firm’s partners to write an appellate brief for a convicted sex offender.  He was a married man about 50 years old, had some grown children, etc.  At some point, he sought out an underage girl via a chatroom (or similar thing), had significant communications with her (some of which was sexual in nature), and eventually arranged a visit to a hotel room for a sexual encounter (which encounter actually took place).  IIRC, the girl’s parents learned of the relationship, turned the matter over to the police, and my client was arrested.  Further, IIRC, the evidence of guilt was overwhelming and damning.

    Here’s the insight I gained about people doing bad things–they begin their logical syllogism the wrong place.  The logic should go like this:

    1. I did something really wicked.
    2. Bad people do wicked things.

    Conclusion:  I am (or have become) wicked.

    Instead, they reason as follows:

    1. I am a pretty good guy (have kids, treat people ok, have a job, etc.).
    2. I did a thing (seduced a minor, killed someone, etc.) that is perceived as wicked.

    Conclusion: What I did isn’t really that bad (or alternatively, what I did wasn’t as bad as when others do it because I had reasons) because as a “good guy”, I’m incapable of doing a wicked thing.

    In my very brief foray into criminal defense appeals, I saw this repeatedly from convicts who did awful things.  It was eye opening mainly because I could see that we all reason that way at times when we want to excuse some bad thing we did (even if it’s not nearly as bad as rape or murder).  It’s a very, very human impulse.

    • #6
  7. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    I really object to this picture of Dr. No.

    Dr. No was a good man, he really cared for his family.

    He was such a good boy.  He was just getting his life together.  He was going to college, to learn how to turn screws.

    Thumb screws!

    • #7
  8. DonG (CAGW is a Scam) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Scam)
    @DonG

    iWe (View Comment):

    Nobody thinks they are the bad guy.

    Well, almost nobody.

    Indeed!  The worst people are those that do bad things thinking they are good things.   For examples see any Leftist.   It is a good thing that we deny poor people electricity, because it pleases Gaia. 

    • #8
  9. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I don’t want to launch a religious argument, but I don’t believe we are all sinners. That kind of overarching statement (for me as a Jew) distorts the facts of our nature, and generalizes in a way that is not helpful. Believing that requires that I’m already starting on the losing team.

    Instead, I believe that I am not a sinner until I commit my first sin. And hopefully I’ve learned and appreciated doing good things along the way. Life offers us many choices; sometimes we do “bad” things, other times we do “good” things. What is important is that we can decide what to do intentionally at every junction. So I have done bad things and am not always sufficiently regretful. (Sometimes I have to work my way up to it.) But I try to focus on the next decision, do good, and find my way back to redemption.

    I am so sorry for the loss of your friend, and based on your judgment, I think he was a good man who did a bad thing.

    • #9
  10. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    I believe those who kill without remorse and even for pleasure should be dispatched from this world as quickly as humanely possible. No more life in prison. Society needs to send the message that such people deserve nothing less.

    • #10
  11. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I don’t want to launch a religious argument, but I don’t believe we are all sinners. That kind of overarching statement (for me as a Jew) distorts the facts of our nature, and generalizes in a way that is not helpful. Believing that requires that I’m already starting on the losing team.

    Instead, I believe that I am not a sinner until I commit my first sin. And hopefully I’ve learned and appreciated doing good things along the way. Life offers us many choices; sometimes we do “bad” things, other times we do “good” things. What is important is that we can decide what to do intentionally at every junction. So I have done bad things and am not always sufficiently regretful. (Sometimes I have to work my way up to it.) But I try to focus on the next decision, do good, and find my way back to redemption.

    I am so sorry for the loss of your friend, and based on your judgment, I think he was a good man who did a bad thing.

    This is interesting to me.  I had thought Jews and Christians held in common the doctrines of original sin resulting in human depravity.

    Sometime (perhaps in another thread) I’d be interested in learning how Jews interpret the following scriptures:

    1. Genesis 3
    2. Psalms 14 & 53 (esp. vs. 2-3)
    3. Ecclesiastes 7:20
    4. Psalm 51:5

    I am certain there are more like it, but these are representative of Old Testament connections made by New Testament Christians related to sin nature and depravity.  Thanks.

    • #11
  12. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    Red Herring (View Comment):

    I believe those who kill without remorse and even for pleasure should be dispatched from this world as quickly as humanely possible. No more life in prison. Society needs to send the message that such people deserve nothing less.

    As a Christian, I agree with you and happen to believe it’s one of the most Christian things to do.  But that’s a whole ‘nother post…

    • #12
  13. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):

    This is interesting to me.  I had thought Jews and Christians held in common the doctrines of original sin resulting in human depravity.

    Sometime (perhaps in another thread) I’d be interested in learning how Jews interpret the following scriptures:

    1. Genesis 3
    2. Psalms 14 & 53 (esp. vs. 2-3)
    3. Ecclesiastes 7:20
    4. Psalm 51:5

    I am certain there are more like it, but these are representative of Old Testament connections made by New Testament Christians related to sin nature and depravity.  Thanks.

    I glanced at those citations, even though, truly, I don’t want to get into an extended religious discussion. I am not saying that man doesn’t commit sin or evil. I simply don’t believe that we are born with the burden of sin on our souls, due to the actions of Adam and Eve, who disobeyed G-d, but I don’t think we must pay for their mistakes. We are called to be good, and not do evil. Clean slate.

    • #13
  14. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Oh dear. This is one of my favorite subjects.

    Part of the problem, as the OP describes so well, is coming from the mass media and education, both of which are fascinated with pop psychology and personality traits and dissecting them.  :-)

    I don’t think there is another academic-professional field that is as confused at its core as psychology. On the one hand, psychologists (and the teachers and parents and professionals they advise) counsel us to never label the person, only the action or deed. I happen to believe in the rightness of this practice with all of my being. And that’s a good thing in my line of work. A person does a selfish deed. That person is not selfish. I never label people.

    This principle is really important in working with children because they take all attention, good or bad, and dwell on it and often try to live up or down to it. Why set that in motion?

    On the other hand, people in the field of psychology make their money on analyzing and trying to predict human behavior and they do so by labeling. They also use such analyses to create plans for therapy.

    So, psychologists know and preach that people’s behaviors do not define them while those same psychologists spend their days doing just that.

    I do not like labels. A person has schizophrenia. He or she is not a schizophrenic. A person has alcoholism. He or she is not an alcoholic. A person “with” a problem can solve it. A person who “is” the problem can’t.

    This labeling of people has confused society greatly, I think. There was a fad a few years ago in the entertainment media of writing stories about “psychopaths” and “sociopaths.” The writers were fascinated by people described to them as being “completely devoid of emotion.” The writers would give these characters diabolical plans to obtain something they wanted and not caring whom they hurt in the process of getting it. Such a person does not, cannot, exist. The writers didn’t seem to realize that the person who “wants” something is experiencing some complex emotions.

    The whole thing was ludicrous. It was sort of like the dysfunctional family craze, which finally ended when people realized that all families and teams are somewhat dysfunctional.

    God seems to have been consistent in telling us he would worry about who was good or evil. That was not for us to know or to try to guess. Every time I see human beings try to do so, I see failure. Human beings are way too complicated for us to judge each other accurately. And we are all sinners. I think that’s the point of the elevation of the saints in the Catholic Church. I’m a Protestant who raised her kids in the Catholic Church. I came to see those stories about the once-sinful saints as the most important education my kids got in their religious classes.

    • #14
  15. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    MarciN (View Comment):
    God seems to have been consistent in telling us he would worry about who was good or evil. That was not for us to know or to try to guess. Every time I see human beings try to do so, I see failure. Human beings are way too complicated for us to judge each other accurately. And we are all sinners.

    If you mean that we all commit sins, I’m with you. I just don’t think we are born that way. And I should add that for those who believe that we are born that way, I’m fine with that. We don’t have to agree.

    • #15
  16. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    I just don’t think we are born that way.

    I don’t either.

    Life is hard, and the longer it is, the harder it is to stay good. :-)

    There’s a great passage in one of C. S. Lewis’s books–either Mere Christianity or the Screwtape Letters, I’ve forgotten which–when Lewis says not to feel too sorry for the young recruits going off to war because they will die young and in a noble pursuit. :-) :-)

     

    • #16
  17. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    God seems to have been consistent in telling us he would worry about who was good or evil. That was not for us to know or to try to guess. Every time I see human beings try to do so, I see failure. Human beings are way too complicated for us to judge each other accurately. And we are all sinners.

    If you mean that we all commit sins, I’m with you. I just don’t think we are born that way. And I should add that for those who believe that we are born that way, I’m fine with that. We don’t have to agree.

    Sincere question–why would “we all commit sins” if it’s not in our nature to do so?  Wouldn’t we find some people who don’t sin?  Or have I misunderstood your comment?

    • #17
  18. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards
    @VanceRichards

    Dr. Bastiat: When the news media sounds more like James Bond than Shakespeare, you know they’re up to something.  Such simplistic representations of human nature don’t even sound real, but they persist with portraying the whole world this way, and hoping that their audience can suspend their disbelief. 

    I think social media makes it easier to turn everyone you disagree with into a cartoon super villains. When there is no human interaction, there is no sense of shared humanity. It is easy to tweet about those “evil MAGA people” but why not try having a civil conversation with a Trump voter?

    • #18
  19. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):
    Sincere question–why would “we all commit sins” if it’s not in our nature to do so?  Wouldn’t we find some people who don’t sin?  Or have I misunderstood your comment?

    I didn’t say it’s not in our nature do sin. I said we are not born sinners. We are born capable to be both good and bad. And hopefully we do lots more good than bad! At least, that’s my intention!

    • #19
  20. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):
    Sincere question–why would “we all commit sins” if it’s not in our nature to do so? Wouldn’t we find some people who don’t sin? Or have I misunderstood your comment?

    I didn’t say it’s not in our nature do sin. I said we are not born sinners. We are born capable to be both good and bad. And hopefully we do lots more good than bad! At least, that’s my intention!

    Thank you–I now understand better.

    • #20
  21. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):
    Thank you–I now understand better.

    …and that is most important to me!

    • #21
  22. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    I have been struggling with suicides that seem to be all around me lately. I have felt an intolerance and a nearly hostile feeling about the act. I think part of it may have to do with my mom passing nearly a year ago and all the many people that will give anything for one more day.

    I remember the story about your friend and the child porn on his computer. As horrible at it is, and his utter distraught, I don’t think it reaches the level of taking one’s own life. Every one of us has absolutely won the lottery. Impossible odds throughout history have brought your parents together. Only then if that miracle happened do you get a one in a million chance of YOU existing. I just can’t see throwing away such a gift from God under any circumstances.

    Given enough time maybe his good could have outweighed his evil. He could have been a counselor and changed the course of 20 future events, who knows. But, that will never happen because of his choice. It’s a double tragedy.

    We all need to remember that bad people are capable of good, just as we are capable of bad. 

    We are all a mixture of good and bad. I tend to believe most people strive towards good with a little thumb on the scale from above, which is most welcome. Good deeds are contagious. When we leave this life let’s hope it’s better than we found it because of us. That’s all we can really ask for.

    • #22
  23. Franco Inactive
    Franco
    @Franco

    My wife works with well over 100 “SVP’s” sexual violent predators each week both individually and in groups. The group sessions are with 8-12 offenders on probation or parole for offenses ranging from not-so-bad (I know,  hard to quantify) to horrific. She also has one group of child porn offenders ( watching)

    But these are not necessarily bad people. Some have asked her “ how can you work with these horrible people!??”

    While prison serves as punishment, how do we stop them? – how do they stop themselves is a better question- and my wife explores with them how to deal with all the factors what caused,  or could cause them to offend, and how to keep from offending again. I swear, my wonderful wife is doing more to ‘save’ children from predators in her work. 

    And  just because there is a maximum taboo on this behavior does not mean these people aren’t compelled to act on their impulses. Sex and sexuality is still quite a mystery. Just because you or I might have a fairly straightforward and normal sexual desires doesn’t mean everyone does (as we all know)  

    The worst thing is for children to be exposed to sex before puberty and most SVP’s were victims of premature sexualization themselves, which is how and why it can get hardwired in their brains.  

    It’s not that difficult to draw the line between responsibility and accountability and compassion.

    But my wife doesn’t give them compassion, she sets boundaries and makes requirements of them to complete the program successfully. But she does respect them as men and as human beings, which is essential to treat them. Part of moving on is not letting some thing define you. Take responsibility make amends take conscious steps to avoid repeating the offense(s) and then you can create a new life and a new ‘you’.

    (all of this is my interpretation and wording, I’m sure the Dr. would be better, but it’d be longer)

    Going to the point of the post, this is why I go ballistic when they excoriated Trump for his overtures to the North Korean tyrant (now our ally, who knew?) .

    You cannot shame your adversary and expect to get any traction in diplomacy. If you are willing to fight, then fight.

    But fighting is complicated. We’re not going to fight right now.

    So we just wag our finger at him and refuse to give him status of an American President talking one on one? This is stupid and accomplishes nothing except it makes our virtue signal well known to ‘the world’.
    Oh,  good for you Obama, Bush, Cheney!  Il is BAD! We shouldn’t talk to him lest it demean us in our perfect democracy where no one is ever mistreated or wrongly imprisoned. We are so much better! Yay us!

    Makes me want to puke.

    Ironically that President was supposed to be ‘bad’  too. He overfed koi fish in Japan fergodsakes!

    • #23
  24. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    DonG (CAGW is a Scam) (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    Nobody thinks they are the bad guy.

    Well, almost nobody.

    Indeed! The worst people are those that do bad things thinking they are good things. For examples see any Leftist. It is a good thing that we deny poor people electricity, because it pleases Gaia.

    Nothing is more dangerous than a liberal with good intentions.

    • #24
  25. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):
    This is interesting to me.  I had thought Jews and Christians held in common the doctrines of original sin resulting in human depravity.

    I have written on this extensively. One example:

     

    G-d does not seem to hold grudges. Throughout the Torah, when man does something contrary to G-d’s wishes, G-d reacts soon after, and the slate is wiped clean. How do we know? Because the Torah never mentions it again.

    So, for example, Eve and Adam eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Consequences (both good and bad) flow from their decision. And the Torah never brings it up again. Not once does the text say, “Because you ate the fruit, you are eternal sinners,” or anything of the sort. Action, reaction, and then onward.

    For both the people and the priests, acknowledging the sin is the means by which we are able to move beyond it, and the means by which G-d can move beyond it as well. If we need any reminder, we can recall that Joshua, Moshe’s successor, ended up marrying the prostitute who sheltered him when he was spying out the land. The Torah does not command us to be perfect – ancient Hebrew does not have a word for “perfect”! On the other hand, we are continually enjoined to aim to do good, to embrace life and, above all, to be holy. Holiness is not a result of birth, or a product of nature or nurture. Holiness is the result of sincerely and enthusiastically seeking a relationship with G-d by partnering with Him in bettering this world. No matter what we have done, the opportunity for teshuvah for return, is available to us for as long as we draw breath.

    • #25
  26. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Judaism is not all that interested in sin. The Torah is always focused on moving on, not obsessing over the past. What we do next is almost always what matters most. 

    The concept of atonement is not in the Torah either: the word use (kaparah) means “cover” – as in covering up so we can move forward. Not eliminating, or atoning, or undoing. 

    The wings of the cherubim stretch out over the cover of the ark – called a kapores. This is the same root word we use for Yom Kippur, and while it is often translated as “atonement,” if we look at context for this word, a more accurate meaning is a protective or insulating layer, allowing close proximity without direct exposure. And we learn it from the way Noach builds the first ark: “Make yourself an ark of gopher wood; make it an ark with compartments, and kapar it inside and out with kapar.” The act of sealing Noach’s ark, and the sealant he used are both the same root word used for the cover of the ark of the covenant!

    and

    I would argue that this is the clear meaning of “kaparah” in the Torah, when applied between G-d and man. A Kaparah is often translated as atonement, but it is a poor translation – just as the giving of an “I’m sorry” gift does not erase the past.  A kaparah is a covering, allowing for a close relationship, even – and especially – when the raw, unalloyed essence of emotion would lead to the end of a relationship. A kaparah is a token, showing G-d that we care, and asking that he has a close relationship with us even though G-d and man are so different that such a relationship would ordinarily mean that we perish before the divine presence.

    • #26
  27. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I really object to this picture of Dr. No.

    Dr. No was a good man, he really cared for his family.

    He was such a good boy. He was just getting his life together. He was going to college, to learn how to turn screws.

    Thumb screws!

    He was learning a trade. 

    • #27
  28. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    iWe (View Comment):
    The Torah is always focused on moving on, not obsessing over the past. What we do next is almost always what matters most. 

    Jack Nicklaus, when asked the key to scoring well in golf, simply said that the most important shot in golf is the next shot.

    If you hit a bad shot, it’s a waste of time to stew over it.  Just focus on hitting the next shot well. And then everything tends to turn out ok, most of the time. 

    • #28
  29. Old Bathos Moderator
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    A good movie script tracks real human experience and is about eternal things like love, loyalty, betrayal, struggle found in all of us imperfect people. A bad script is often one in which the writer has lost touch with human nature, human eternals and instead his protagonists deliver an op-ed about The Issues and the antagonists turn into 2D cartoons.

    Liberals live that bad script. 

    In real life, the challenge is often that the bad guys usually don’t think they are the bad guys. The hyper-rationalized, nakedly hypocrital, dehumanizing world of the left desperately needs to create/invent villains as cartoonish and simplistic as they are.

    Good people can be undone by a single unmet defect. Bad people can sometimes enjoy the sheer surprise of redemption (Oskar Schindler comes to mind).

    When we can again freely teach and write about the eternal truths of our nature (and enjoy the classic explorations of great literatureand drama), our social and political life will be better, like a good script. 

     

    • #29
  30. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    DaveSchmidt (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I really object to this picture of Dr. No.

    Dr. No was a good man, he really cared for his family.

    He was such a good boy. He was just getting his life together. He was going to college, to learn how to turn screws.

    Thumb screws!

    He was learning a trade.

    And he was kind to cats.

    • #30
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