First Time Reading a Romance Novel

 

I’ve been trying to add some variety to my reading list lately, and it occurred to me that I had never read a romance novel. I asked my wife to recommend one, and she gave me The Girl With the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn. One of the blurbs actually says, “If you’ve never read romance novels, start here.”

The characters are all British, and it takes place in New York during the Revolutionary War. Our leading lady has come to NY to look for her brother, an officer who was wounded and has gone missing. Instead, she finds his best friend, also a wounded officer, who is unconscious in a makeshift military hospital. In order to be allowed to stay with him, she lies and says that she is his wife, hence the book’s title. Of course, he eventually wakes up, and she has to decide whether to continue her deception or to risk everything by coming clean. Complications ensue.

It probably won’t surprise you to learn that she is young, beautiful, and innocent; smart, brave, and determined; stronger than she knows yet moved by powerful emotions of joy and heartbreak. Her pretend husband is a little older, more knowledgeable in the ways of the world (and of the opposite sex), strong and disciplined, but also kind and playful at times. I hope I’m not giving too much away when I say that circumstances bring them together, then pull them apart, and then, when all seems lost, bring them together again at the end.

Now, I’ve watched lots of Hallmark movies with the wife, so this was not unfamiliar narrative territory. It was interesting to see it play out in this longer format, although at times it seemed to move rather slowly. It had a little more bosom-heaving than Hallmark, but not much. I don’t think I’ll be reading any more of these.

I was looking to see if it had a theme described many years ago by Warren Farrell in his book Why Men Are the Way They Are. He wrote that porn for men meets an obvious desire – sexual access to lots of women – but what do romance novels (the closest thing to porn for women) supply their readers? He read a lot of them and concluded that the one consistent theme was that while the female characters were always capable, it was their connection to men that gave them access to opportunities and experiences they couldn’t have had otherwise. He called this being “Flashdanced” after the movie where a great dancer gets into a school she wants, against the odds, because a man is pulling some strings behind the scenes.

I think that applies to this book to some extent, where the main character plays on her connection to the wounded officer to get a place to stay, the benefits of being an officer’s wife, and help in looking for her brother, etc. I’m not sure it quite lines up as well as Flashdance.

In any case, on to other things. Now reading Troy Senik’s book on Grover Cleveland, which is very good. There aren’t many books about a guy who only served as Buffalo’s mayor for one year.

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  1. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    Retail Lawyer (View Comment):

    Is The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte a romance novel?

    I dunno. I watched the movie, and wasn’t quite sure what it was about. ;-)  

    Well, I guess it kind of was. 

    • #31
  2. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    Retail Lawyer (View Comment):

    Is The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte a romance novel?

    I dunno. I watched the movie, and wasn’t quite sure what it was about. ;-)

    Well, I guess it kind of was.

    It’s also possible that the movie didn’t follow the novel very well.

    • #32
  3. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    TBA (View Comment):
    I don’t even know any Spanish! You can prove nothing!

    I had to look up one of the words. I recognized “Tinder,” but not one of the main Spanish words in the sentence.

    In high school I knew a girl who went abroad and was told, “My love for you is like burning haystack.” 

    I do not believe she succumbed despite the obvious conflagratory concerns. 

    • #33
  4. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    kedavis (View Comment):

    For example, does anyone know of a framework author/architect that is female? The people that come up with Jini, or Ruby on Rails, or Hibernate, or the like. I can’t recall a single female author of groundbreaking ideas, either theoretical or practical.

    There are profound differences between men and women in world view and mode of thought. These are evident from the literature they create, the literature they consume and the way they comport themselves over the spans of their careers.

    The archetypal chick flick – Gone with the Wind – is described in its own advertising as a searing tale of passion in a world gone mad. Essentially, it’s about the feelings of the protagonist in a world that is utterly beyond the protagonist’s control. If a Mills and Boon novel has a happy ending, it’s provided by the intervention of a man. At no point does a woman attempt to change her world. She adapts to it, cries about it, or waits for a man to change it for her.

    Men, by contrast, write about almost nothing but taking control of their world, and the mechanics by which this is attempted.

    Another fundamental difference is the list thing. Men teach one another the mechanism, the distilled principle, because there is less to remember and it has to be taken in context anyway. Women want a fixed context and rote instructions. If you try to teach them the principles instead, they don’t listen and they get angry, saying “I don’t care why, I just asked you to tell me what to do.” If you give them a list of steps it must be exhaustive like a computer program because (also like a computer program) if context changes breaking the procedure or if anything has been omitted, blame is ascribed to the writer of the procedure.

    A direct consequence of this intellectual inflexibility is that women do not create tools. They can be taught to use them, often very well, provided that the use of the tool can be described as lists of steps – programs!

    Visit a craft shop like Spotlight. It will be crawling with women who think they are creative. In fact all they ever do is stick glitter to boxes, or cut cloth according to a plan that was almost certainly created by a man, before stitching it together using a sewing machine definitely both invented and made for them by men.

    Some of them will vary the patterns, but creation ex nihilo is a behaviour exhibited almost exclusively by men.

    I suppose you could say that women play god using the thing between their legs, whereas men use the thing between their ears. Probably this is enculturated behaviour. Possibly it is an artefact, in men, of the inability to play god the easy way; certainly many of us see our creations as children of sorts.

    Yep, that’s a cancellin’. 

    • #34
  5. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    TBA (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    For example, does anyone know of a framework author/architect that is female? The people that come up with Jini, or Ruby on Rails, or Hibernate, or the like. I can’t recall a single female author of groundbreaking ideas, either theoretical or practical.

    There are profound differences between men and women in world view and mode of thought. These are evident from the literature they create, the literature they consume and the way they comport themselves over the spans of their careers.

    The archetypal chick flick – Gone with the Wind – is described in its own advertising as a searing tale of passion in a world gone mad. Essentially, it’s about the feelings of the protagonist in a world that is utterly beyond the protagonist’s control. If a Mills and Boon novel has a happy ending, it’s provided by the intervention of a man. At no point does a woman attempt to change her world. She adapts to it, cries about it, or waits for a man to change it for her.

    Men, by contrast, write about almost nothing but taking control of their world, and the mechanics by which this is attempted.

    Another fundamental difference is the list thing. Men teach one another the mechanism, the distilled principle, because there is less to remember and it has to be taken in context anyway. Women want a fixed context and rote instructions. If you try to teach them the principles instead, they don’t listen and they get angry, saying “I don’t care why, I just asked you to tell me what to do.” If you give them a list of steps it must be exhaustive like a computer program because (also like a computer program) if context changes breaking the procedure or if anything has been omitted, blame is ascribed to the writer of the procedure.

    A direct consequence of this intellectual inflexibility is that women do not create tools. They can be taught to use them, often very well, provided that the use of the tool can be described as lists of steps – programs!

    Visit a craft shop like Spotlight. It will be crawling with women who think they are creative. In fact all they ever do is stick glitter to boxes, or cut cloth according to a plan that was almost certainly created by a man, before stitching it together using a sewing machine definitely both invented and made for them by men.

    Some of them will vary the patterns, but creation ex nihilo is a behaviour exhibited almost exclusively by men.

    I suppose you could say that women play god using the thing between their legs, whereas men use the thing between their ears. Probably this is enculturated behaviour. Possibly it is an artefact, in men, of the inability to play god the easy way; certainly many of us see our creations as children of sorts.

    Yep, that’s a cancellin’.

    That’s why we can’t have nice true things.

    • #35
  6. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    kedavis (View Comment):

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    It may be of limited value here, but I’ll toss in a comment I found on a discussion about differences in computer programming ability, mostly in general but sometimes with emphasis between women and men.

     

    Another fundamental difference is the list thing. Men teach one another the mechanism, the distilled principle, because there is less to remember and it has to be taken in context anyway. Women want a fixed context and rote instructions. If you try to teach them the principles instead, they don’t listen and they get angry, saying “I don’t care why, I just asked you to tell me what to do.” If you give them a list of steps it must be exhaustive like a computer program because (also like a computer program) if context changes breaking the procedure or if anything has been omitted, blame is ascribed to the writer of the procedure.

    A direct consequence of this intellectual inflexibility is that women do not create tools. They can be taught to use them, often very well, provided that the use of the tool can be described as lists of steps – programs!

    Visit a craft shop like Spotlight. It will be crawling with women who think they are creative. In fact all they ever do is stick glitter to boxes, or cut cloth according to a plan that was almost certainly created by a man, before stitching it together using a sewing machine definitely both invented and made for them by men.

    Some of them will vary the patterns, but creation ex nihilo is a behaviour exhibited almost exclusively by men.

    I suppose you could say that women play god using the thing between their legs, whereas men use the thing between their ears. Probably this is enculturated behaviour. Possibly it is an artefact, in men, of the inability to play god the easy way; certainly many of us see our creations as children of sorts.

    What the quote conveys is that women are stoo-pid. “Intellectual inflexibility” is just a wordy way of saying that.

    Not really. Many very smart people are total dunces when it comes to computer programming. I’ve met some.

    He spoke about a good deal of things other than programming. It’s almost like he’s sad ‘cuz women won’t date him, and he’s “externalizing” his “locus of control.” There, I used what was probably a man’s invention to say something totally unoriginal! 

    • #36
  7. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Matt Bartle (View Comment):

    I know women complain that their portrayal in porn is not realistic [true], but then how many men can be like the heroes of romance novels? I mean, how many of us are Scottish clan leaders? Or tycoons?

    A couple of neuroscience researchers analyzed 15,000 (!) Harlequin romance novels and tabulated the professions of the male leads.  Results here:  What does a woman want?

    • #37
  8. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    It may be of limited value here, but I’ll toss in a comment I found on a discussion about differences in computer programming ability, mostly in general but sometimes with emphasis between women and men.

     

    Another fundamental difference is the list thing. Men teach one another the mechanism, the distilled principle, because there is less to remember and it has to be taken in context anyway. Women want a fixed context and rote instructions. If you try to teach them the principles instead, they don’t listen and they get angry, saying “I don’t care why, I just asked you to tell me what to do.” If you give them a list of steps it must be exhaustive like a computer program because (also like a computer program) if context changes breaking the procedure or if anything has been omitted, blame is ascribed to the writer of the procedure.

    A direct consequence of this intellectual inflexibility is that women do not create tools. They can be taught to use them, often very well, provided that the use of the tool can be described as lists of steps – programs!

    Visit a craft shop like Spotlight. It will be crawling with women who think they are creative. In fact all they ever do is stick glitter to boxes, or cut cloth according to a plan that was almost certainly created by a man, before stitching it together using a sewing machine definitely both invented and made for them by men.

    Some of them will vary the patterns, but creation ex nihilo is a behaviour exhibited almost exclusively by men.

    I suppose you could say that women play god using the thing between their legs, whereas men use the thing between their ears. Probably this is enculturated behaviour. Possibly it is an artefact, in men, of the inability to play god the easy way; certainly many of us see our creations as children of sorts.

    What the quote conveys is that women are stoo-pid. “Intellectual inflexibility” is just a wordy way of saying that.

    Not really. Many very smart people are total dunces when it comes to computer programming. I’ve met some.

    He spoke about a good deal of things other than programming. It’s almost like he’s sad ‘cuz women won’t date him, and he’s “externalizing” his “locus of control.” There, I used what was probably a man’s invention to say something totally unoriginal!

    It’s analogies and stuff.  Other examples.  And the main article, as I mentioned, was about programming ability vs non-ability in general.  Also, there’s Jordan Peterson referencing engineers etc.

     

    • #38
  9. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    kedavis (View Comment):

    It may be of limited value here, but I’ll toss in a comment I found on a discussion about differences in computer programming ability, mostly in general but sometimes with emphasis between women and men.

     

    For example,  …. 

    [Pruned for Prudence]

    [T]he… 

    [Cut for Caution] 

    …and… 

    [Snipped for Safety]

    [T]hey…

    [Redacted for Radioactivity]

    [O]f sorts.

    There is some truth here, but Not All Women, etc. I have certainly met women as described above, and will readily admit that women – not you dear Ricochicks, I’m talkin’ ’bout them other [redacted] – tend to be rare at the top of a lot of creative and inventive fields. We’ve had years of STEM-rolling female students, but they ran concurrent with a participation trophy ethos. 

    I’m not prepared to say that women can’t cut it when a) some do cut it, and b) I am convinced that some of them found things that appealed to them more. 

    Anyhow, that’s my mansplainin’ and I’m stickin’ to it. 

    Note to Self: delete comment in the event of NEA SWAT team. 

     

     

     

     

     

    • #39
  10. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    I can’t remember who said it of women, or exactly what was said, or even what I had for breakfast this morning, but the idea was something to the effect that women find a better work/life balance. Again this is of limited utility, but in the sorting hat of med school seems to put women into House Pediatrics, and House OB/Gyn, while men end up in House Surgery and House Radiology. 

    Guess where the flexible office hours are. 

    • #40
  11. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    TBA (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    It may be of limited value here, but I’ll toss in a comment I found on a discussion about differences in computer programming ability, mostly in general but sometimes with emphasis between women and men.

     

    For example, ….

    [Pruned for Prudence]

    [T]he…

    [Cut for Caution]

    …and…

    [Snipped for Safety]

    [T]hey…

    [Redacted for Radioactivity]

    [O]f sorts.

    There is some truth here, but Not All Women, etc. I have certainly met women as described above, and will readily admit that women – not you dear Ricochicks, I’m talkin’ ’bout them other [redacted] – tend to be rare at the top of a lot of creative and inventive fields. We’ve had years of STEM-rolling female students, but they ran concurrent with a participation trophy ethos.

    I’m not prepared to say that women can’t cut it when a) some do cut it, and b) I am convinced that some of them found things that appealed to them more.

    Anyhow, that’s my mansplainin’ and I’m stickin’ to it.

    Note to Self: delete comment in the event of NEA SWAT team.

     

     

     

     

     

    Indeed, that was most of the gist of the Peterson clip.  These areas of performance are mostly at the edges of the bell curve, to put it in that term, which means that few of EITHER gender are really excellent at it; but most of the ones that are, are men.

    • #41
  12. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    TBA (View Comment):

    I can’t remember who said it of women, or exactly what was said, or even what I had for breakfast this morning, but the idea was something to the effect that women find a better work/life balance. Again this is of limited utility, but in the sorting hat of med school seems to put women into House Pediatrics, and House OB/Gyn, while men end up in House Surgery and House Radiology.

    Guess where the flexible office hours are.

    Also I would venture, again in line with the Peterson video, that Surgery and Radiology are going to be more dealing with THINGS – surgical equipment, radiology equipment… – than people.

    • #42
  13. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    For those interested, the original article appears to still be available:

     

    https://blog.codinghorror.com/separating-programming-sheep-from-non-programming-goats/

    • #43
  14. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    kedavis (View Comment):

    TBA (View Comment):

    I can’t remember who said it of women, or exactly what was said, or even what I had for breakfast this morning, but the idea was something to the effect that women find a better work/life balance. Again this is of limited utility, but in the sorting hat of med school seems to put women into House Pediatrics, and House OB/Gyn, while men end up in House Surgery and House Radiology.

    Guess where the flexible office hours are.

    Also I would venture, again in line with the Peterson video, that Surgery and Radiology are going to be more dealing with THINGS – surgical equipment, radiology equipment… – than people.

    I deny reading the above and will testify to the same at the inquest. 

    • #44
  15. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    TBA (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    I HIGHLY recommend An Infamous Army by Georgette Heyer. She is known for her bodice rippers. But apparently she had access to Wellington’s private correspondence. Part bodice ripper part historically accurate,minute by minute account of the battle of Waterloo, this novel is required reading at military academies around the world.

    For me, it is a ‘ must read’!

    “Oh take me!,” she gasped, “Here on the hot cannon, for I cannot bear to wait longer!”
    “Madam, your need is great, as is mine. But England’s is greater still, for She relies now on the fighting passions of stout-hearted men and I must not fall into temptation like some common Frenchman. There is the additional consideration that the cannon in question has likely attained a temperature akin to a metal stove.”

    Now that was LOL.

    • #45
  16. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    My wife grew up reading Mills and Boone and she got very upset when I likened romance novels to porn.  But she apparently knows a lot about Scottish men from her reading.

    • #46
  17. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    kedavis (View Comment):

    For example, does anyone know of a framework author/architect that is female? The people that come up with Jini, or Ruby on Rails, or Hibernate, or the like. I can’t recall a single female author of groundbreaking ideas, either theoretical or practical.

    There are profound differences between men and women in world view and mode of thought. These are evident from the literature they create, the literature they consume and the way they comport themselves over the spans of their careers.

    The archetypal chick flick – Gone with the Wind – is described in its own advertising as a searing tale of passion in a world gone mad. Essentially, it’s about the feelings of the protagonist in a world that is utterly beyond the protagonist’s control. If a Mills and Boon novel has a happy ending, it’s provided by the intervention of a man. At no point does a woman attempt to change her world. She adapts to it, cries about it, or waits for a man to change it for her.

    Men, by contrast, write about almost nothing but taking control of their world, and the mechanics by which this is attempted.

    Another fundamental difference is the list thing. Men teach one another the mechanism, the distilled principle, because there is less to remember and it has to be taken in context anyway. Women want a fixed context and rote instructions. If you try to teach them the principles instead, they don’t listen and they get angry, saying “I don’t care why, I just asked you to tell me what to do.” If you give them a list of steps it must be exhaustive like a computer program because (also like a computer program) if context changes breaking the procedure or if anything has been omitted, blame is ascribed to the writer of the procedure.

    A direct consequence of this intellectual inflexibility is that women do not create tools. They can be taught to use them, often very well, provided that the use of the tool can be described as lists of steps – programs!

    Visit a craft shop like Spotlight. It will be crawling with women who think they are creative. In fact all they ever do is stick glitter to boxes, or cut cloth according to a plan that was almost certainly created by a man, before stitching it together using a sewing machine definitely both invented and made for them by men.

    Some of them will vary the patterns, but creation ex nihilo is a behaviour exhibited almost exclusively by men.

    I suppose you could say that women play god using the thing between their legs, whereas men use the thing between their ears. Probably this is enculturated behaviour. Possibly it is an artefact, in men, of the inability to play god the easy way; certainly many of us see our creations as children of sorts.

    I wonder if a woman can ever truly love a finely crafted tool.

    • #47
  18. Susan in Seattle Member
    Susan in Seattle
    @SusaninSeattle

    Flicker (View Comment):

    My wife grew up reading Mills and Boone and she got very upset when I likened romance novels to porn. But she apparently knows a lot about Scottish men from her reading.

    Maybe the kilts have something to do with that.

    • #48
  19. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Matt Bartle (View Comment):

    I know women complain that their portrayal in porn is not realistic [true], but then how many men can be like the heroes of romance novels? I mean, how many of us are Scottish clan leaders? Or tycoons?

    A couple of neuroscience researchers analyzed 15,000 (!) Harlequin romance novels and tabulated the professions of the male leads. Results here: What does a woman want?

    What.  No lawyers?

    • #49
  20. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Flicker (View Comment):

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Matt Bartle (View Comment):

    I know women complain that their portrayal in porn is not realistic [true], but then how many men can be like the heroes of romance novels? I mean, how many of us are Scottish clan leaders? Or tycoons?

    A couple of neuroscience researchers analyzed 15,000 (!) Harlequin romance novels and tabulated the professions of the male leads. Results here: What does a woman want?

    What. No lawyers?

    Useful as villains.

    • #50
  21. Susan in Seattle Member
    Susan in Seattle
    @SusaninSeattle

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I wonder if a woman can ever truly love a finely crafted tool.

    I have a great fondness for my kitchen knives.  One in particular has seen me through many cooking, catering, baking gigs over 35 years.  No one other than Mr. SiS gets to use it. 

     

    • #51
  22. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Flicker (View Comment):

    My wife grew up reading Mills and Boone, whatever that is, and she got very upset when I likened romance novels to porn. But she apparently knows a lot about Scottish men from her reading.

    Sadly, dailymotion doesn’t allow for pre-positioning.  But the relevant point is at 15:50 (video seems compressed a bit, and maybe sped up some as often happens for copyright avoison, but still watchable)

     

    • #52
  23. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Susan in Seattle (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I wonder if a woman can ever truly love a finely crafted tool.

    I have a great fondness for my kitchen knives. One in particular has seen me through many cooking, catering, baking gigs over 35 years. No one other than Mr. SiS gets to use it.

    I once bought a carbon steel 9″ knife direct from France.  It was modern manufacture, and the blade thickness was off and the edge needed reshaping.  I spent hours getting it shaped properly and the edge just right.

    One day I came home and my wife was looking oddly at me.  She had tried to separate frozen chicken thighs using my new knife to pry the pieces apart.  There was a 1″ by 1/4″ crescent shaped chunk chipped out of the center of the edge.  That’s okay, I put it aside and every now and then I take it out and wonder what I can repurpose it for.  But I ordered two more, just is case.

    • #53
  24. mildlyo Member
    mildlyo
    @mildlyo

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    I HIGHLY recommend An Infamous Army by Georgette Heyer. She is known for her bodice rippers. But apparently she had access to Wellington’s private correspondence. Part bodice ripper part historically accurate,minute by minute account of the battle of Waterloo, this novel is required reading at military academies around the world.

    For me, it is a ‘ must read’!

    I strongly recommend anything by Georgette Heyer. “Cotillion” is a favorite.

    There is a science fiction version of Heyer’s novels in “Lord Vorpatril’s Alliance” by Lois Bujold.

    • #54
  25. Susan in Seattle Member
    Susan in Seattle
    @SusaninSeattle

    mildlyo (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    I HIGHLY recommend An Infamous Army by Georgette Heyer. She is known for her bodice rippers. But apparently she had access to Wellington’s private correspondence. Part bodice ripper part historically accurate,minute by minute account of the battle of Waterloo, this novel is required reading at military academies around the world.

    For me, it is a ‘ must read’!

    I strongly recommend anything by Georgette Heyer. “Cotillion” is a favorite.

    There is a science fiction version of Heyer’s novels in “Lord Vorpatril’s Alliance” by Lois Bujold.

    My favorite is  The Grand Sophy.  Utterly entertaining.

    • #55
  26. Susan in Seattle Member
    Susan in Seattle
    @SusaninSeattle

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Susan in Seattle (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I wonder if a woman can ever truly love a finely crafted tool.

    I have a great fondness for my kitchen knives. One in particular has seen me through many cooking, catering, baking gigs over 35 years. No one other than Mr. SiS gets to use it.

    I once bought a carbon steel 9″ knife direct from France. It was modern manufacture, and the blade thickness was off and the edge needed reshaping. I spent hours getting it shaped properly and the edge just right.

    One day I came home and my wife was looking oddly at me. She had tried to separate frozen chicken thighs using my new knife to pry the pieces apart. There was a 1″ by 1/4″ crescent shaped chunk chipped out of the center of the edge. That’s okay, I put it aside and every now and then I take it out and wonder what I can repurpose it for. But I ordered two more, just is case.

    Oh. My. Goodness.  Perhaps she can be credited for a difficult feat.  My first knife, as a student in culinary school in 1982 was (I think) an 11″ carbon steel knife.  Holds an edge like nobody’s business.  However, a little unwieldy and takes a lot of scrubbing to keep it looking good.  I still have it and it seems indestructible.  Therefore, what your wife did isn’t the easiest thing on the planet. 

    • #56
  27. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Susan in Seattle (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Susan in Seattle (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    I wonder if a woman can ever truly love a finely crafted tool.

    I have a great fondness for my kitchen knives. One in particular has seen me through many cooking, catering, baking gigs over 35 years. No one other than Mr. SiS gets to use it.

    I once bought a carbon steel 9″ knife direct from France. It was modern manufacture, and the blade thickness was off and the edge needed reshaping. I spent hours getting it shaped properly and the edge just right.

    One day I came home and my wife was looking oddly at me. She had tried to separate frozen chicken thighs using my new knife to pry the pieces apart. There was a 1″ by 1/4″ crescent shaped chunk chipped out of the center of the edge. That’s okay, I put it aside and every now and then I take it out and wonder what I can repurpose it for. But I ordered two more, just is case.

    Oh. My. Goodness. Perhaps she can be credited for a difficult feat. My first knife, as a student in culinary school in 1982 was (I think) an 11″ carbon steel knife. Holds an edge like nobody’s business. However, a little unwieldy and takes a lot of scrubbing to keep it looking good. I still have it and it seems indestructible. Therefore, what your wife did isn’t the easiest thing on the planet.

    She’s very determined.  One time I came home and she had had to get to work after I left, and the bedroom door was in splinters around the door knob and the whole door knob assembly, guts and all, was sitting in one piece on the bedroom on the window sill.  I asked her what happened and it seems the bedroom door got locked (I think we had inherited exterior door knobs on the bedrooms at the time), and she took my K-Bar knife and hacked the door knob out.  The knife was also missing 3/4″ off the tip.  Now she uses it for gardening.

    I can’t help but smile when I think of her hacking and prying the wood loose.  She’s very determined.  But she got to work on time.

    • #57
  28. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    TBA (View Comment):

    cornpop, jr. (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Were any bodices ripped?

    I’m not sure I’d want to read about Grover Cleveland ripping bodices.

    Grover ‘Cleavage’ Cleveland was actually quite the ladies’ man.

    Ma, Ma where’s my Pa. Gone to the White House, hah,hah,hah.

    • #58
  29. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    If my husband asked about reading a romance novel, I would probably recommend Rebecca or Jane Eyre or an Austen. Have you read any of those? Or would you not consider them a romance as you were thinking of? Thanks.

    • #59
  30. Matt Bartle Member
    Matt Bartle
    @MattBartle

    colleenb (View Comment):

    If my husband asked about reading a romance novel, I would probably recommend Rebecca or Jane Eyre or an Austen. Have you read any of those? Or would you not consider them a romance as you were thinking of? Thanks.

    I was just thinking of the contemporary ones, since they account for so many book sales. I think romance and mysteries are the most popular genres.

    • #60
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