Say Her Name: Allison “Allie” Rice. Another Senseless Execution in a Third-World Democrat-Run City

 

‘When you hear the words from the policeman saying, “she’s with the coroner now, she didn’t make it.” It’s the most devastating words you can ever hear.’

That city, Baton Rouge, LA, just happens to have been our home for almost 45 years before we moved to the Florida Panhandle four years ago. Thus, writing this is more than a little bittersweet—painful for the loss of a beautiful young woman with a very promising life ahead of her, cut off execution-style by street animals (please don’t insult me by telling me they are humans, not animals), for the unimaginable pain her family must be going through, and sadness at what our former hometown has turned into under the “enlightened” “leadership” of a Democrat Mayor and Administration who are returned to office repeatedly by the votes of “Dead Baton Rouge,” about which more below.

A prefatory note before discussing the violent murder of Allie Rice on the evening of September 16, 2022. In reviewing materials related to this murder, along with those of several other beautiful young white women in Memphis, West Memphis, and Los Angeles, I was struck by the near-identical scenes wrapped up with police tape, cars with blue lights flashing in the gloom, and the inevitable, almost identical press conferences with the Mayor, Police Chief and/or DA, mouthing the same tragically worn-out platitudes and clichés about how “unacceptable” this is and how it “must stop!” As if to rub salt in the wound, some lovely comments were made about helping the family of one victim by the DA of that city: George Gascon of Los Angeles, who is single-handedly responsible for the crime wave now engulfing LA. Absolutely disgusting.

Same scene, over and over and over again:

Here is the way one journalist (yes, there are still a few left and this is definitely one of them— Scott McKay) describes the piece of theater which passed as the press conference by the Mayor and Police Chief of Baton Rouge yesterday:

We could forecast what we expect Broome and Paul to say at that press conference, and you can, too.  It’s almost assuredly going to be a pep talk about how hard our betters are working to insure we’ll be safe while announcing exactly zero policy changes of substance whatsoever. And with BRPD being short 120 officers from its full complement, it isn’t like there’s a lot they could do anyway.

Anything short of Broome firing Paul and announcing some highly-respected hardass who’ll take over the BRPD, or maybe a merger between BRPD and the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office in hopes that a consolidation would lead to better leadership and communication, probably won’t impress us.

Really, the problem is far bigger than some clownish politician and her hand-puppet police chief could ever solve. Dead Baton Rouge is full of monsters, and they’re multiplying, and all the things Sharon Broome is going to say will tamp down crime – jobs in the hood, education and so on – are just hot air.

Allison Rice was a senior at LSU and about to graduate with a degree in marketing. She was, as we can readily see from the photos below, a beautiful young woman with a very promising life ahead of her:

Allie:

She was, by all accounts, a vivacious, loving, cheerful person who paradoxically had gone to be with a friend working at a bar in the area so she would not have to be alone when she closed the business at 2 a.m. Once that was accomplished safely, the two friends said “I Love You” to each other and went their separate ways. Twenty minutes later, Allie was slaughtered while sitting in her car waiting for a train to pass.

Allie:

Here is an account of the incident from a person who was also waiting for the train to pass, going in the opposite direction:

“I was bringing my friend home who lives on Government St. When we got on Government, we came up to the train tracks and the train was at a complete stop. Not even 10 minutes later, these two guys walked past my car. One of them was wearing darker clothes with long sleeves. One of them was wearing a red hoodie with the hoodie over his head. They were both black males, I would say mid 20’s and both of them were around 5’10 or 5’11,” said the witness.

“At this time, her vehicle pulled up (Allison Rice’s silver SUV). I was going away from downtown on Government and she was coming towards downtown. These two guys walked past my vehicle. The train was still at a complete stop. They were walking through the cars of the train to get across the tracks. Not even 10 minutes went by and I heard the gunshots go off,” he said.

“I heard multiple gunshots, at least five to six over and after that, I could still see her car parked. As soon as the gunshots went off, she tried to turn around and then she just stopped. I could not tell where the gunshots were coming from but I just knew they were very close to me. I ended up backing out and leaving. That’s when I suspected the person heard them too and was leaving as well. My first instinct was that I don’t need to be here, I need to leave.”

“I ended up getting back on the interstate. I went around the train and got off at Dalrymple and went to drop off my friend. I went back home and went to bed. The next morning, I saw that someone had been found dead by the tracks. That’s when I realized that’s exactly the car I saw and the time and the gunshots I heard.”

The accident scene where Allie was waiting on a train to pass:

Allie Rice’s Murder Is Shaking Baton Rouge To Its Core

I write this a week after the murder and, shockingly, as there were reportedly a number of surveillance cameras in the area, no suspects have been identified. However, the inevitable press conference was held yesterday in which the Mayor and the Police Chief mouthed the same meaningless blather we hear at every such “availability” by our “leaders.”

A spot-on analysis in The Spectator, authored by McKay, gives further background:

Live Baton Rouge is absolutely livid over Allison Rice’s murder. By all accounts she was a beautiful, talented, and effervescent young woman who had worked as a server and bartender at The Shed, a recently opened barbecue restaurant her father owns part of where her two brothers are also employed. The restaurant put up a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of her killer.

But the local rumor mill has it that the powers that be are attempting to bury the murder along with the other unsolved cases, at least in the public’s attention. The police say they have no leads, and a department source actually suggested to WAFB-TV that people feeling unsafe driving on Government Street near the train crossing might simply take an alternate route.

And LSU, which is desperate to avoid bad publicity surrounding the murder of one of its students, suggested that Rice’s classmates might seek counseling for the emotional trauma surrounding her death.

They’re trying to bury this case, because everyone knows what happened to Allison Rice. She was shot (or at least shot at) 10 times at close range by a street criminal who approached her while she was a sitting duck at a train crossing. Maybe it was an attempted carjacking, maybe just a thoroughly senseless killing — here was a defenseless white girl shot to death for attempting to flee from an urban predator or two.

McKay also graphically illustrates the gulf between attention given incidents involving black victims and those who are white, such as Allie:

In July 2016, in what turned out to be the final gasp of actual law enforcement in the city, a morbidly obese drug dealer and habitual felon named Alton Sterling was camped out in front of a convenience store in the early-morning hours of a weekday, just a little ways north of the spot where Allison Rice was killed. Sterling, whose cover had it that he was selling bootleg CDs, pulled a gun on someone in the convenience store parking lot. The police were called. And in the struggle that ensued when two officers arrived at the scene, Sterling attempted to pull out his pistol and was shot dead for his trouble.

There were racial protests, which were only short of riots because local law enforcement stood strong against them, following the Sterling shooting. And a couple of weeks later a black separatist terrorist named Gavin Long ambushed police into a gun battle, shooting six and killing four.

That fall Sharon Weston Broome, a state senator from Dead Baton Rouge, won election over a pro-cop Republican in a close race. Everything has cratered from there.

Broome has especially destroyed the Baton Rouge Police Department through starving it of funds and leadership; she fired the police chief and installed a puppet, the almost comically incompetent Murphy Paul, to run the force.

And now more than half of the murders — in a rash of them Baton Rouge had never seen before — go unsolved.

By the way, the Baton Rouge Metro Council eventually agreed to pay a $5 million settlement to Alton Sterling’s family.

There will never be a dime paid to Allison Rice’s survivors.

He notes there are actually two Baton Rouges:

The truth is, there are two Baton Rouges, not just one.

There is the Baton Rouge that exists at the 1500 block of Government Street and essentially everywhere north of there. That Baton Rouge is monolithically black, horrendously poor — while the median family income of white residents of Baton Rouge was $98,000 in 2019, for blacks it was a pathetic $31,000 that same year — government-dependent, and absolutely awash in crime and drugs. It’s one of Michelle Obama’s famous food deserts; the storefronts that used to house supermarkets, shops, retail centers, and other businesses are still there, but they’re largely empty and abandoned, every shred of copper wiring or anything else of value removed to the black market.

That Baton Rouge elects politicians who carp constantly at the need for “investment” in a community that has systematically destroyed any possible incentive business might have in throwing money into its maw. The stores closed because what customers there were weren’t enough to sustain them against the shrinkage rate, and because the violent crime in the parking lot made it unpalatable to operate. And without any change in the culture that killed commerce in those neighborhoods, that economic reality cannot and will not change.

It’s a dead Baton Rouge. “Kill or be killed” is the quintessentially idiotic phrase to describe it. It’s Jackson, Mississippi with a nice-tasting water supply…for now.

And there is the Baton Rouge that exists for most of the parts south of the 1500 block of Government Street. That Baton Rouge is bustling with commerce — shops, car dealerships, restaurants, industry, new construction. It isn’t monolithically white, but a large majority of it is. A large swath of it is unincorporated, and residents there are attempting to create the city of St. George in a situation not wholly dissimilar to what the proposed city of Buckhead is doing in Atlanta.

And catching the same reaction from the powers that be.

Because Dead Baton Rouge has more votes than Live Baton Rouge.

And, as Kipling so wisely put it, “never the twain shall meet.”

And with that line from an old Barracks Ballad, we have summed up the Catch-22 dilemma of crime in so many of our cities because, as McKay puts it, until “Dead Baton Rouge” and “Live Baton Rouge” come together and mutually decide enough is enough, this seemingly endless cycle of inhuman destruction and violence will continue unabated.

To at least attempt to assure that I make this tragic tale as fair and balanced as possible, I turn to the words of the current District Attorney of East Baton Rouge Parish (County), Hillar Moore, with this personal observation. He was an admired colleague at the Bar when we practiced there and he was, in addition, a good and personal friend. Thus, I believe his words in this recent statement:

District Attorney Hillar Moore told WBRZ on Tuesday that federal agencies like the FBI, ATF and DEA were helping with the investigation locally. Moore added that detectives have investigated every tip they’ve received, refuting claims on social media that police had not taken some witness statements.

He echoed those sentiments by Baton Rouge Police saying all signs point to this murder being an “isolated and random act.”

“They are working their tails off trying to get info they can. There are also rumors as phones are ringing off the hook… People saying what they think happened. I caution people not to go there,” Moore said.

The district attorney said none of the tips they’ve received so far has been enough to identify a suspect.

“Everything that can possibly done is being done right now by every agency regardless of the initials behind their name. Whether it’s state police, DEA, ATF, FBI… you name it. Everyone is working and working this matter expeditiously as we speak,” Moore said.

In a piece titled Allie Rice’s Murder Is Shaking Baton Rouge To Its Core, the author sums up the way all decent people feel about this kind of indescribable horror and the utter destruction it leaves in its wake:

Why Allie Rice and not the other murder victims in Baton Rouge? Nobody said this was exclusive. All of these cases are equally offensive to decent people. But Allie Rice is the latest one, and her case has resonated because we can all see her murder in our mind’s eyes.

We can see her moment of terror as the monster raises his gun, and we can feel her life give way as she throws her SUV in reverse in a last spasm of desperation as she bleeds out.

We can see it, and we are enraged.

We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

The pain inflicted upon the family is reflected in small part by these words of Allie’s Dad:

‘When you hear the words from the policeman saying, “she’s with the coroner now, she didn’t make it.” It’s the most devastating words you can ever hear.’

Allie is, bizarrely and illogically and indecently, no longer with us. But one must wonder how many more executions, as that is plainly what this was, of how many more Allies is it going to take to finally cause “the twains to meet” and stop this gross, grotesque insult to our collective humanity and decency?

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  1. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Excellent post, Jim.  Check out the one south of you here on the Member Feed.  Same kind of situation, slightly different viewpoints.

    That’s what makes Ricochet great.

    • #1
  2. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Excellent post, Jim. Check out the one south of you here on the Member Feed. Same kind of situation, slightly different viewpoints.

    That’s what makes Ricochet great.

    Thank you kindly; I will definitely take a look at the other one-looks most interesting! 

    I repeat what I have said before – I really enjoy and admire your blog; gives me a goal to strive for in mine, although I would be the first to admit I could never master the beautiful way you have yours set up!

    Some day I would love to share views about classical music; seems I read somewhere you had been in the Seattle Symphony Orchestra at one time. Our season- Pensacola Symphony Orchestra- starts in a couple of weeks and I can’t wait! 

    • #2
  3. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Fury. It’s the only rational response. Yes, she may be a more “appealing” victim than others. But it is the mindset that led to this murder and the conditions that made the perpetrator even think this might be a good idea, that must be addressed straight on and firmly. And for those that will not respect their fellow man, sure swift and persistent justice should be meted out and the psychos kept away from everyone else. 

    • #3
  4. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Jim George (View Comment):

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Excellent post, Jim. Check out the one south of you here on the Member Feed. Same kind of situation, slightly different viewpoints.

    That’s what makes Ricochet great.

    Thank you kindly; I will definitely take a look at the other one-looks most interesting!

    I repeat what I have said before – I really enjoy and admire your blog; gives me a goal to strive for in mine, although I would be the first to admit I could never master the beautiful way you have yours set up!

    Some day I would love to share views about classical music; seems I read somewhere you had been in the Seattle Symphony Orchestra at one time. Our season- Pensacola Symphony Orchestra- starts in a couple of weeks and I can’t wait!

    Um, nope.  I played in the Everett Symphony for about 15 years, but I did not have to audition to get in.  If I had, I would not have passed.  The Everett Symphony is defunct, and I have not played my violin in two years.  I still love classical music, though.

    • #4
  5. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    I’m going to give you a bit of a hard time, Jim.

    They are humans, not animals.

    What they did was atrocious.  But they are humans.

    If you are insulted by this, you may need to update your understanding of humanity.  Do you think that we’re all saints?  Do you think that humans never do terrible things? 

    This is not animal behavior.  It is evil behavior.  As far as I can tell, we’re the only creatures on the planet capable of evil.

    I understand the rhetorical temptation to call them animals.  It actually seems a bit insulting to the animals, on reflection.  If a lion or bear mauled and killed a lovely young woman, it would be a tragedy, but not a moral outrage.  The thing that makes the humans who did this uniquely culpable is precisely their humanity.  They are not animals.  They are evil.

    What they might not deserve is “dignity.”  We’ve adopted an attitude in our culture, fairly recently as far as I can tell, that we have to treat murdering criminals in a humane fashion.  We might want to reconsider that.

    • #5
  6. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    • #6
  7. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    Excellent. Hate to disappoint our more philosophical colleagues, whose opinions I obviously respect, these are not humans we are dealing with who could do such a thing to any human being. She was shot TEN TIMES. How in the world was that even necessary since she was obviously not threat to him/them after the first one or two? Animals. 

    • #7
  8. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):
    They are humans, not animals.

    I repeat: they are ANIMALS. This is not a philosophic seminar or a seminarian discussion; this is how I view the actions of anyone who could shoot a defenseless young woman TEN TIMES THROUGH THE WINDSHIELD  to make sure she bled out before she could get her vehicle turned around and get away from the ANIMALS who were determined to execute her. 

    John Kerry used to talk about simple people (like me) and called them by one of his favorite French words (he did own a chateau in France, you will kindly remember!) simplisme. That’s me! And, in my simplisme way, I view anyone who could commit this grotesque an offense against another human being, not to be too nuanced about it (another John Kerry favorite word), an ANIMAL. And here’s another very un-nuanced observation for you — if this had been my daughter (My Lady’s niece looks hauntingly like Allie and she is also a student at LSU) my approach to these ANIMALS would be most un-nuanced, indeed; one might also use the words terminally un-nuanced. Sorry if that shocks your sensibilities, but I would wager that has to be what every Dad, Grandfather, Uncle or other adult male is thinking right about now. Perhaps they are just more nuanced than I am. 

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):
    If you are insulted by this, you may need to update your understanding of humanity.  Do you think that we’re all saints?  Do you think that humans never do terrible things? 

    Jerry, I have followed your posts/comments with great interest and have learned much from some of them but this time I must ask: who in the world are you to lecture me on the quality of my understanding of humanity or, for that matter, my beliefs in anything? 

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):
    If a lion or bear mauled and killed a lovely young woman, it would be a tragedy, but not a moral outrage.

    If I were her Dad, it most certainly WOULD be a moral outrage, to me, and I would find a way to redress that outrage any way I could no matter the cost. Period. 

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):
    What they might not deserve is “dignity.”  We’ve adopted an attitude in our culture, fairly recently as far as I can tell, that we have to treat murdering criminals in a humane fashion.  We might want to reconsider that.

    I knew if I read far enough I would find something I could agree with you on, and this seems to be it, as this is just another way of saying we are repulsed by the Soros-funded DAs around the country giving more credence to murderers than to the families of their victims. And, not to argue philosophy with you, THAT is what I consider to be EVIL. 

    Sincerely, Jim

    • #8
  9. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    I’m going to give you a bit of a hard time, Jim.

    They are humans, not animals.

    What they did was atrocious. But they are humans.

    If you are insulted by this, you may need to update your understanding of humanity. Do you think that we’re all saints? Do you think that humans never do terrible things?

    This is not animal behavior. It is evil behavior. As far as I can tell, we’re the only creatures on the planet capable of evil.

    I understand the rhetorical temptation to call them animals. It actually seems a bit insulting to the animals, on reflection. If a lion or bear mauled and killed a lovely young woman, it would be a tragedy, but not a moral outrage. The thing that makes the humans who did this uniquely culpable is precisely their humanity. They are not animals. They are evil.

    What they might not deserve is “dignity.” We’ve adopted an attitude in our culture, fairly recently as far as I can tell, that we have to treat murdering criminals in a humane fashion. We might want to reconsider that.

    Humanly speaking, I was chided recently for not including humans as primates.  And the “anima” in animals mean living, doesn’t it?  Have you ever seen a cat play with (torture!) a frog, or a mouse, or a lizard or a chick.  The idea is to let them go, to try to runaway, and then catch them between their teeth.  Sure, animals can be evil; they just don’t know it.

    But even if I accept your argument, what’s left?  Monsters.  Yes, humans can be monsters and that’s far worse that mere animals.

    • #9
  10. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Jim George (View Comment):

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    Excellent. Hate to disappoint our more philosophical colleagues, whose opinions I obviously respect, these are not humans we are dealing with who could do such a thing to any human being. She was shot TEN TIMES. How in the world was that even necessary since she was obviously not threat to him/them after the first one or two? Animals.

    And one more thing.  There comes a point when men’s consciences are seared, as with a hot iron, cauterizing them, destroying the living material leaving it dead, rendering them beyond spiritual communication with God: this is point beyond which the Holy Spirit will not strive with man.  What are they then?  Living, but ineluctably dead.  Animated but without conscience.  Animals.

    • #10
  11. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    I don’t know why isolated and random should make us feel better. At least in “shot in a drug deal gone bad”, I have some control over my participation – don’t do drug deals.

    Isolated and random means anyone, anywhere could be next.

    • #11
  12. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Stina (View Comment):

    I don’t know why isolated and random should make us feel better. At least in “shot in a drug deal gone bad”, I have some control over my participation – don’t do drug deals.

    Isolated and random means anyone, anywhere could be next.

    Randomness is a facet of terrorism, too.

    • #12
  13. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Jim George (View Comment):

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    Excellent. Hate to disappoint our more philosophical colleagues, whose opinions I obviously respect, these are not humans we are dealing with who could do such a thing to any human being. She was shot TEN TIMES. How in the world was that even necessary since she was obviously not threat to him/them after the first one or two? Animals.

    Humans do evil things like that. Animals do not. 

    • #13
  14. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Jim George (View Comment):

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    Excellent. Hate to disappoint our more philosophical colleagues, whose opinions I obviously respect, these are not humans we are dealing with who could do such a thing to any human being. She was shot TEN TIMES. How in the world was that even necessary since she was obviously not threat to him/them after the first one or two? Animals.

    Humans do evil things like that. Animals do not.

    You give animals too much credit. 

    • #14
  15. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Annefy (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Jim George (View Comment):

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    We’re enraged by the crime experts from the parts of town the monsters control chiding us that she was somewhere she shouldn’t have been, as though driving the major thoroughfares of Baton Rouge is somehow a sin. And we’re disgusted at the idea there is something wrong with finally having had enough of the violence, the crime and the behavioral pathology infecting this town.

    This reaction from “crime experts” is BS. It is a rationalization to try and mitigate the fact there are rabid dogs masquerading as human beings in Baton Rouge. They are [F….]. These two individuals deserve the 147-grain frontal lobotomy from Dr. Glock. I had a friend who was a detective when I was a street cop. He had a sign on his desk that stated, “The only reason some people aren’t dead yet is because it’s against the law to kill them”. Hate to look at it this way, but it’s true. I’m an old school street cop, I don’t see it any other way.

    Excellent. Hate to disappoint our more philosophical colleagues, whose opinions I obviously respect, these are not humans we are dealing with who could do such a thing to any human being. She was shot TEN TIMES. How in the world was that even necessary since she was obviously not threat to him/them after the first one or two? Animals.

    Humans do evil things like that. Animals do not.

    You give animals too much credit.

    I’ll admit that our cat has been known to play with her prey animals before finishing them off and eating them, but I presume the purpose is not to do evil but to learn more skills for prey hunting and handling.   It was something she used to do a lot more when she was first learning how to do it (and without a mother around to teach her).  Well, she also likes to show off her skillz and make gifts of the prey, but so far she hasn’t shot any of them dead ten times. 

    • #15
  16. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter
    @DaveCarter

    Jim, this is an excellent post and I can tell it nearly ripped your heart out to write it.  I grew up in Baton Rouge long ago (1964 – 1974).  I was 12 when we moved, but always had fond memories of the place where my Dad would take me to LSU home games and life was magical. I hate that my city and much of my state has gone the way of idiot savagery (which is one reason why I too have resettled in the FL panhandle).  Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and to some extent even parts of my home town of Lake Charles, have all gone the way of Memphis, which I was happy to put in my rear view mirror.  My fear is that these Democrat-run hellholes are but a precursor to a nationwide trend. Thank you for writing this, and I’m so terribly sorry you had to do so. 

    • #16
  17. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stina (View Comment):

    I don’t know why isolated and random should make us feel better. At least in “shot in a drug deal gone bad”, I have some control over my participation – don’t do drug deals.

    Isolated and random means anyone, anywhere could be next.

    Well, less likely if you don’t live in a Democrat-controlled city or state.

    • #17
  18. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    Dave Carter (View Comment):

    Jim, this is an excellent post and I can tell it nearly ripped your heart out to write it. I grew up in Baton Rouge long ago (1964 – 1974). I was 12 when we moved, but always had fond memories of the place where my Dad would take me to LSU home games and life was magical. I hate that my city and much of my state has gone the way of idiot savagery (which is one reason why I too have resettled in the FL panhandle). Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and to some extent even parts of my home town of Lake Charles, have all gone the way of Memphis, which I was happy to put in my rear view mirror. My fear is that these Democrat-run hellholes are but a precursor to a nationwide trend. Thank you for writing this, and I’m so terribly sorry you had to do so.

    Dave, I have been struggling to find a way to adequately thank you for one of the finest comments any of my posts have ever generated, if not the nicest, and to try to put in words how much those words mean coming from a writer and speaker and historian (USAF!) and journalist and podcaster and publisher of your stature. However, I will have to hope that a simple Thank You will suffice and to tell you how much it meant to me and My Lady ( my Life Partner, Law Partner and entire Editorial Staff!).  I was unaware that you grew up in Red Stick and your comments brought back memories of my days as a Boy Scout when we would get to go to the LSU games free and I especially remember the Ole Miss games as those folks would come up on the train (those were the days!) already six sheets to the wind and one time I had to go home and explain to Mom why I reeked of Bourbon as an Ole Miss fan had thrown a cup of booze at someone nearby and it landed on me! We lived on Fairfield Ave., which is now basically a no-go zone with gangs roaming the streets where we once played ball. And, of course, New Orleans under LaToya the Destroya is now the official murder capital of America; don’t know whether you saw the piece I did on her but you can access it here; she is a total disaster and emptying the business community (what’s left of it) as fast as she can. And you are correct in observing how difficult it was to write that post, as we have a niece who just entered LSU who bears a striking resemblance to Allie and it’s just impossible to imagine anything like that happening to her. That and the fact that we have gone over that crossing more times than we can remember –it really hit home for us! Thank you, Dave; much appreciated. Jim

    • #18
  19. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    At least we know to absolute certainty that LaToya the Destroya couldn’t possibly be racist.

    • #19
  20. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter
    @DaveCarter

    Jim George (View Comment):

    Dave Carter (View Comment):

    Jim, this is an excellent post and I can tell it nearly ripped your heart out to write it. I grew up in Baton Rouge long ago (1964 – 1974). I was 12 when we moved, but always had fond memories of the place where my Dad would take me to LSU home games and life was magical. I hate that my city and much of my state has gone the way of idiot savagery (which is one reason why I too have resettled in the FL panhandle). Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and to some extent even parts of my home town of Lake Charles, have all gone the way of Memphis, which I was happy to put in my rear view mirror. My fear is that these Democrat-run hellholes are but a precursor to a nationwide trend. Thank you for writing this, and I’m so terribly sorry you had to do so.

    Dave, I have been struggling to find a way to adequately thank you for one of the finest comments any of my posts have ever generated, if not the nicest, and to try to put in words how much those words mean coming from a writer and speaker and historian (USAF!) and journalist and podcaster and publisher of your stature. However, I will have to hope that a simple Thank You will suffice and to tell you how much it meant to me and My Lady ( my Life Partner, Law Partner and entire Editorial Staff!). I was unaware that you grew up in Red Stick and your comments brought back memories of my days as a Boy Scout when we would get to go to the LSU games free and I especially remember the Ole Miss games as those folks would come up on the train (those were the days!) already six sheets to the wind and one time I had to go home and explain to Mom why I reeked of Bourbon as an Ole Miss fan had thrown a cup of booze at someone nearby and it landed on me! We lived on Fairfield Ave., which is now basically a no-go zone with gangs roaming the streets where we once played ball. And, of course, New Orleans under LaToya the Destroya is now the official murder capital of America; don’t know whether you saw the piece I did on her but you can access it here; she is a total disaster and emptying the business community (what’s left of it) as fast as she can. And you are correct in observing how difficult it was to write that post, as we have a niece who just entered LSU who bears a striking resemblance to Allie and it’s just impossible to imagine anything like that happening to her. That and the fact that we have gone over that crossing more times than we can remember –it really hit home for us! Thank you, Dave; much appreciated. Jim

    Jim, you honor me way too much. Trust me, I’ve known me all my life and I’m not worth half a thimble full of your kind words. Nevertheless, I’ll have to widen the doorways now so my head fill fit through. That, and my hats won’t fit.  So thank you sir!! 

    I’m getting back into the swing of things here on Ricochet and that begins with reading. Your post spoke to my heart and my head for the following reasons:

    My kindergarten was on campus, at a church mere blocks from the stadium. I’ve had multiple cousins that graduated from LSU, and an uncle who was a mathematics professor of some sort there as well. My mother was employed for a time at a music store in town called Wurlein’s, I believe.  But I was very young, so I may not have the particulars right.  We lived in East BR Parish (mu Dad was ordained at Winbourne Ave Baptist Church) before moving to the Sherwood Forest area while Dad was in seminary in New Orleans.  All that preamble is merely to add context to how utterly heartbreaking and dispiriting it is to hear what’s happened to my home.  I literally share your pain,..and frustration as we both realize that it didn’t have to be this way. A rudimentary understanding of history tells us what works and what doesn’t work, but “Dead Baton Rouge,” like Dead Memphis, Dead Detroit, Dead Philadelphia, et al. 

    So as I say, I loved your post, though I know it had to hurt harder than many would understand to write it.  Glad to hear you’re in the panhandle though.  Maybe there’s a Ricochet meet up idea there someplace.  

    • #20
  21. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Humans do evil things like that. Animals do not.

    You give animals too much credit.

    I’ll admit that our cat has been known to play with her prey animals before finishing them off and eating them, but I presume the purpose is not to do evil but to learn more skills for prey hunting and handling.   It was something she used to do a lot more when she was first learning how to do it (and without a mother around to teach her).  Well, she also likes to show off her skillz and make gifts of the prey, but so far she hasn’t shot any of them dead ten times. 

    Relevant to the issue of humans vs animals, I’ve recently started watching Vlad Vexler, and I think I agree with him when he says genocide is just as much a product of human nature as prayer is. “What Putin is doing now is just as much a part of human nature as what his opponent in jail, Alexei Navalny, is doing.”  Or you could say that the savage murder described in the OP is as much a product of human nature as prayer is. 

    That came at about 4:00 in this video on “How to critique Chomsky on Ukraine.”

    When I heard him say that I immediately stopped watching to come here and report. Now back to the video.

    • #21
  22. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Humans do evil things like that. Animals do not.

    You give animals too much credit.

    I’ll admit that our cat has been known to play with her prey animals before finishing them off and eating them, but I presume the purpose is not to do evil but to learn more skills for prey hunting and handling. It was something she used to do a lot more when she was first learning how to do it (and without a mother around to teach her). Well, she also likes to show off her skillz and make gifts of the prey, but so far she hasn’t shot any of them dead ten times.

    Relevant to the issue of humans vs animals, I’ve recently started watching Vlad Vexler, and I think I agree with him when he says genocide is just as much a product of human nature as prayer is. “What Putin is doing now is just as much a part of human nature as what his opponent in jail, Alexei Navalny, is doing.” Or you could say that the savage murder described in the OP is as much a product of human nature as prayer is.

    That came at about 4:00 in this video on “How to critique Chomsky on Ukraine.”

    When I heard him say that I immediately stopped watching to come here and report. Now back to the video.

    I can easily critique Chomsky on damn near anything:  he’s only a linguist.

    • #22
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