The Past, Present and Future of the Monarchy

 

Toby Young (Photo:Shutterstock)

It was just after 6:30 in the evening as news spread that Her Majesty the Queen had passed at age 96. Toby Young, the English journalist and co-host of Ricochet’s London Calling podcast was in a crowded restaurant, ready to head off to an event for the Free Speech Union. He heard it from another patron. “An elderly woman, at the nearby table, just reached over and touched my arm to tell me… and that sort of thing never happens in this country. So, that tells you something about the impact of the news and what it means to people.”

This, the death of a monarch, is something that Englishmen have not experienced in over seven decades. It seemed that the Queen was near indestructible. Elizabeth “has been a great source of continuity and solace to the British people. She’s been there for so long. And I think her death will add to the general sense of foreboding that’s currently abroad in the country.”

Charles III, says Toby, has a difficult road ahead. “It’s true that Prince Charles isn’t held in anything like the esteem the Queen is. Perhaps not surprising because being the heir to the throne is a pretty thankless job. You’re preparing for a job your entire life that, in his case, you don’t get to do until your mid-70s, by which time most people have retired.”

“But I think he’s aware of the fact that he’s never going to be as popular or as loved as she was, and I think for that reason he will bring William into a very prominent role during his reign. He knows that William has a bit of that Royal magic that he lacks. He has a glamorous wife and a young family, which is endearing. I think Charles will offset any risk his unpopularity poses to the future of the monarchy by doing a job share with William.”

While the future of the monarchy may be secure, what worries Young is the future of the Commonwealth.

“Various countries have seceded from the Commonwealth in the past few years and there are republican movements in several Commonwealth countries — Australia, Canada — that will, I think, seize the opportunity – not today or not tomorrow – but in the months to come, to say, ‘Okay, now it’s time to break away from this antediluvian institution. It’s a relic of… the British Empire, and it’s time to sever the umbilical cord.’ So I think that will be Charles’s greatest challenge, to keep the Commonwealth together in the aftermath of the Queen’s death.”

During her years on the throne, Elizabeth never tried to appear outwardly political. Charles, on the other hand, has embraced the global warming and so-called “Net Zero” agenda. His first Prime Minister, Liz Truss, has been sceptical and with the specter of a cold and energy starved winter ahead, Truss lifted the national ban on fracking earlier this week.

“The tricky thing, I think, would be for Charles to remain as detached from the political moment as his mother has been able to do during a succession of prime minsters.

“Until now he’s managed to champion that cause without seeming to enter the political fray, because there’s been a good deal of consensus between the different political parties on doing something about climate change, such as reducing our carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. That was an objective shared by the big three political parties so was not contentious and Charles could promote it without seeming to be engaging in politics. But because it looks as though Ms. Truss is going to depart from that consensus – not dramatically but a little bit – that’s going to pose a real challenge for Charles. It is the big issue he’s made his own. Will he be able to leave it alone, to rise above it, remain completely neutral, which is essential if the monarchy is going to survive? We shall see.”

 

 

 

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  1. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    It is fitting he ascends as his subjects freeze due to his policies.

     

    • #1
  2. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    As I asked in another thread, will Charles III be more like Charles I or Charles II?  

    • #2
  3. EJHill+ Podcaster
    EJHill+
    @EJHill

    DaveSchmidtAs I asked in another thread, will Charles III be more like Charles I or Charles II?

    I doubt that he will either be executed OR father 12 illegitimate children. Not at his age.

    • #3
  4. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    EJHill+ (View Comment):

    DaveSchmidt: As I asked in another thread, will Charles III be more like Charles I or Charles II?

    I doubt that he will either be executed OR father 12 illegitimate children. Not at his age.

    Those are reasonable doubts.  

    • #4
  5. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    For me, a 69-year-old American retiree, Elizabeth II’s death marks not only the passing of her personage, but the end of the world I grew up in. Not necessarily or entirely a bad thing. But it’s sad nonetheless, watching through the fog as the final marker falls.

    • #5
  6. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):

    For me, a 69-year-old American retiree, Elizabeth II’s death marks not only the passing of her personage, but the end of the world I grew up in. Not necessarily or entirely a bad thing. But it’s sad nonetheless, watching through the fog as the final marker falls.

    Oh, I’d say it’s mostly a bad thing.

    America — I hardly recognize the place.

    • #6
  7. randallg Member
    randallg
    @randallg

    Here in Canada there is not much of a republican movement. Sure, plenty of people when asked, will say “Ya we don’t need no monarchy.” But few feel strongly about it. Not to mention that our constitution is virtually impossible to change, and that would be a hell of a big change. I think it is different in Australia.

    Here are some snapshots of her life, expressed in terms of the postal history of British North America.

    https://www.facebook.com/randall.gasdf/posts/pfbid0L9Ey2Pe7oTjiZfP5icJ4hWnLBBysGh7fcEjrYivxSz9hQu81bsTYLFx2Egn79yTLl

    • #7
  8. Trink Coolidge
    Trink
    @Trink

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):

    For me, a 69-year-old American retiree, Elizabeth II’s death marks not only the passing of her personage, but the end of the world I grew up in. Not necessarily or entirely a bad thing. But it’s sad nonetheless, watching through the fog as the final marker falls.

    Oh, I’d say it’s mostly a bad thing.

    America — I hardly recognize the place.

    Dan of iAllegedly nailed it today:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TW9qLU2_koU&t=490s

     

    • #8
  9. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    EJHill+: But because it looks as though Ms. Truss is going to depart from that consensus – not dramatically but a little bit – that’s going to pose a real challenge for Charles. It is the big issue he’s made his own. Will he be able to leave it alone, to rise above it, remain completely neutral, which is essential if the monarchy is going to survive? We shall see.”

    This is the heart of the matter. Charles III will squander the political and social capital carefully accumulated by his mother over the past 70 years in the first few months of his reign, unless he keeps his mouth shut and just reads the proclamations given him by the government (meaning in Britain the PM and her cabinet).

    • #9
  10. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    EJHill+: But because it looks as though Ms. Truss is going to depart from that consensus – not dramatically but a little bit – that’s going to pose a real challenge for Charles. It is the big issue he’s made his own. Will he be able to leave it alone, to rise above it, remain completely neutral, which is essential if the monarchy is going to survive? We shall see.”

    This is the heart of the matter. Charles III will squander the political and social capital carefully accumulated by his mother over the past 70 years in the first few months of his reign, unless he keeps his mouth shut and just reads the proclamations given him by the government (meaning in Britain the PM and her cabinet).

    He may, foolishly, have some sort of informal alliance with Britain’s deep state–the civil service.  #Resistance and all that.  

     

    • #10
  11. EJHill+ Podcaster
    EJHill+
    @EJHill

    DaveSchmidt: He may, foolishly, have some sort of informal alliance with Britain’s deep state–the civil service. 

    I don’t believe he’s had much day-to-day contact with them. Staff of the Royal household do not fall under the Civil Service, even though they are considered employees of the Crown.

    • #11
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