Clean Elections in Arizona Should Be More Than a Slogan

 

Is voting in Arizona secure?  In light of the questions regarding the 2020 elections and the 2022 primaries, this is a valid question.

First, it is important to note that no verification of residence, citizen status or identification is required to register to vote in Arizona.  You can register online by simply stating you are a resident citizen.  Or you can register simply by filling out a form and mailing/delivering it to the appropriate state office.  In fact, it is more difficult to get a “Real ID” driver’s license in Arizona than it is to register to vote.  To obtain a “Real ID you must provide a birth certificate, Passport or a valid work permit or Green card.  To become a voter, you need NOTHING except access to the internet.  It is a system primed for the creation of fictitious or otherwise illegal voters.

Arizona has also evolved to become a vote-by-mail state.  In 1991, the State loosened its absentee ballot rules.  A voter could then request an absentee ballot for any reason.  But it was not until 2007, under Democrat Governor Janet Napolitano, that Arizona adopted the Permanent Early Voting List “PEVL.”  This was essentially, mail-in voting.  In fact, it is reported that in the last primary, over 80% of the votes cast in that election were mail-in ballots. Arizona also has early voting, where one can go to certain polls well in advance of the election and cast their ballots in person.

If one votes in person, an ID check is required.  Not all ID checks are the same and of those accepted, several alternative and acceptable forms have no real identifying information at all other than a name and address.  This wouldn’t deter an illegal voter with any sense at all.

Then there is the signature check.  I was surprised in 2020 that this was no longer performed by poll workers in Maricopa County where I live.  Instead, I signed a tablet screen (you’ve seen this at many a retailer) so the check was “digital.”  I remember wondering at the time whether this was an improvement over the old system.  I’m still not sure.  Still, they check your ID, which is better by far than any other procedure, as long as the ID is one of the primary picture IDs.

The real issues lie with the early ballots.  First and foremost, every early ballot contains a bar code linking it to the registered voter.  Now this might be preferable in determining the status of a returned ballot (the code can be checked to ensure that the voter has not already cast a ballot) but it also provides a means for linking actual votes cast to the ballot and the person voting!  Now this might prove to be an excellent audit tool, but it does place in question the confidential status of a person’s ballot and vote.

Also, the only ID requirement for an early vote is the signature check on the envelope.  This is a weak control in any case as our signatures do change with age.  I don’t know the exact procedures employed to verify signatures as mail-in ballots are opened and counted, however, once these papers are decoupled, there is no revisiting the issue.  And decoupled they must be to scan the ballots and count them.

As one can imagine, many voters on the permanent early voting list fail to return their ballots early and either mail them in beyond the prescribed date or bring them to a poll station.  This places poll stations with the added burden of dealing with late early ballots.  This is the main reason election results take so long to compile in Arizona on election night.

Now, here are some of my thoughts as to how these issues might be addressed and election integrity enhanced.  First and foremost, proof of citizenship and residence must be required to register to vote.  For citizenship verification, that would be, a current US Passport, a certified copy of a US Birth Certificate or a Certificate of Naturalization and a Government Issued Picture ID (GIPID), or a voter ID card from another state that similarly requires proof of citizenship to register to vote, along with a GIPID.  For proof of residence, that would mean a current lease or recent mortgage statement or utility bill, or a GIPID, matching your name and current address.  These are essentially the same documents required to obtain a “Real ID” at the DMV, so motor voter registration would still be possible.  And online registration would also be possible as copies of the required documents could be accepted and attached to any online application.

We also need better control over the PEVL and absentee voting.  First and foremost, people need to know that their names are directly linked to their early ballots, that is, if they vote early by mail, the confidentiality of their cast ballots could easily be compromised.  This may well be a leap of trust that many voters may not want to risk.  Second, early ballot envelopes should be preserved and should contain a bar code that matches the related ballot bar code, linking it ex post facto to that ballot and the early voter.  That way, if envelopes are preserved, they can be matched with ballots in a recount or audit and signatures re-verified.

Early voters should be given a firm deadline for mailing their early ballot.  This deadline should be well in advance of election day.  Lock boxes should be eliminated altogether.  Unopened, mailed ballots postmarked after election day should be franked (pierced through with special press) as late and invalid, and preserved.  A subsequent scan of the bar codes on these invalid ballots should be made and compared to in-person voter lists to ensure that any voter did not attempt to vote twice.  If a second vote is indicated, that vote should also be invalidated and the voter investigated for voter fraud.

If a person on the PEVL has failed to return a vote and wishes to go to the polls, even the early polls, that voter should arrive at the polls with ID and with the assigned, unreturned, early ballot and envelope.  After checking ID, the ballot should be placed in the envelope, signed or unsigned, scanned to verify validity and to update the registered voter data, and voided in the early mail-in voter record.  The actual package should then be franked and retained with other voided early ballots.  The person should then be processed as a regular election day voter showing ID, providing signature and given a ballot.  Voters who bring early voter ballots to the polls should be subsequently removed from the PEVL.

If an early voter arrives at a poll to vote (so noted after ID and voter list check) but fails to bring the assigned early ballot (verified as not returned), a provisional ballot may be completed, isolated and later processed after all statewide mail-in ballots have been processed.  If no mail-in ballot is returned for that voter, the provisional ballot may be counted.  If an early vote is returned for that voter, the voter should be investigated for voter fraud and neither vote counted.

Last of all, we come to the issues with voting machines.  I assume that we have sufficient control over these machines to ensure that they compile votes accurately.  The issue is with rejection and adjudication.  The adjudication process begins with the initial scan.  If an initial scan is complete and accepted, the voter should be assured that his or her vote was cast without question.  Problems causing doubt should be addressed immediately, for example, a poll worker might ask, “Did you purposefully not voter for State Mine Inspector?” if a voter failed to cast a vote for that position.  Or better yet, a “no preference vote” might be added to be cast for any positions a voter may abstain from addressing.  This would eliminate the possibility of stuffing ballots for one race.  It should be extremely difficult to adjudicate any vote cast in person and those circumstances should be rare indeed and the process documented and conducted by representatives of all parties concerned.  There should be NO adjudication without representation and without documentation, that is no electronic alteration of ballots and certainly no bulk adjudication at all.

The same is true of mail-in ballots.  It is extremely important that partisan representatives on both sides be involved with the processing of mail-in ballots, from voter and signature verification, to scanning, to adjudication and to chain of custody concerns.  Likewise, in the review of late ballot post mark review, sorting, processing of valid ballots, and the franking and voiding late ballots.

It may be that in 1991, Arizona attempted to lift the restrictions on absentee voting, especially for snowbirds who chose to become state residents, but it was quite another thing when early voting was codified into law during Napolitano’s governorship.  We now have a bastardization of both in-person and mail-in voting, which has become an administrative nightmare, causing confusion and inviting fraud, and making it impossible for us to compile results in anything like a reasonable time after election day.  This does not inspire confidence in our elections.  And worse, we make it easy for non-citizens to register and vote in our elections.

It’s time to tighten things up. Arizona elections have become an embarrassment.  You can call it “Clean Elections” all you want, but if you want to inspire confidence, it takes more than a commission, a title, and a bunch of empty sloganeering.

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  1. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    You’re harshing Gary’s mellow!

    • #1
  2. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    It’s been decided that clean elections with verifiable voter standards is “Trumpism.” 

    First, it is important to note that no verification of residence, citizen status or identification is required to register to vote in Arizona.

    This point alone gives lie to any defense that the election of 2020 was clean. 

    • #2
  3. Kevin Schulte Member
    Kevin Schulte
    @KevinSchulte

    Hopefully your new Governess will make this job 1 .

    • #3
  4. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Democrats cheat…always. The easier it is, the more they cheat. With rules such as you have described Arizona has zero chance of being a Red state. This is very disturbing.

    • #4
  5. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Doug Kimball: Last of all, we come to the issues with voting machines.  I assume that we have sufficient control over these machines to ensure that they compile votes accurately.  The issue is with rejection and adjudication.  The adjudication process begins with the initial scan.  If an initial scan is complete and accepted, the voter should be assured that his or her vote was cast without question.  Problems causing doubt should be addressed immediately, for example, a poll worker might ask, “Did you purposefully not voter for State Mine Inspector?” if a voter failed to cast a vote for that position.  Or better yet, a “no preference vote” might be added to be cast for any positions a voter may abstain from addressing.  This would eliminate the possibility of stuffing ballots for one race.  It should be extremely difficult to adjudicate any vote cast in person and those circumstances should be rare indeed and the process documented and conducted by representatives of all parties concerned.  There should be NO adjudication without representation and without documentation, that is no electronic alteration of ballots and certainly no bulk adjudication at all.

    I want those machines and the software that runs on them audited and tracked. I want to know if these systems are capable of being configured to perform other than a straight one-to-one vote, and if so, what controls are in place to guarantee that the “configuration” stays the same for every machine throughout the tabulation process.

    • #5
  6. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Percival (View Comment):

    Doug Kimball: Last of all, we come to the issues with voting machines. I assume that we have sufficient control over these machines to ensure that they compile votes accurately. The issue is with rejection and adjudication. The adjudication process begins with the initial scan. If an initial scan is complete and accepted, the voter should be assured that his or her vote was cast without question. Problems causing doubt should be addressed immediately, for example, a poll worker might ask, “Did you purposefully not voter for State Mine Inspector?” if a voter failed to cast a vote for that position. Or better yet, a “no preference vote” might be added to be cast for any positions a voter may abstain from addressing. This would eliminate the possibility of stuffing ballots for one race. It should be extremely difficult to adjudicate any vote cast in person and those circumstances should be rare indeed and the process documented and conducted by representatives of all parties concerned. There should be NO adjudication without representation and without documentation, that is no electronic alteration of ballots and certainly no bulk adjudication at all.

    I want those machines and the software that runs on them audited and tracked. I want to know if these systems are capable of being configured to perform other than a straight one-to-one vote, and if so, what controls are in place to guarantee that the “configuration” stays the same for every machine throughout the tabulation process.

    ANY computer is capable of that.  I’m surprised, although I probably shouldn’t be, at the people who seem to think that computers can only count, and can only do so accurately.

    Of course, even if 100% guaranteed to be counting accurately, they could still be accurately counting truckloads of improper/invalid/illegal ballots.

    • #6
  7. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    Doug, I have questions about your proposed ID requirement of a lease or mortgage statement or utility bill.

    What if you live with someone else?  You might be an adult living with your parents, or a parent living with your children.  You might be living with a friend or other relative.  You might be a caretaker living with an elderly or disabled person.

    For that matter, you might be homeless, but living in a certain area.

    Aren’t all of these hypothetical people entitled to vote?  I mean, assuming that they are citizens.  I know people in several of these categories.

    • #7
  8. Doug Kimball Thatcher
    Doug Kimball
    @DougKimball

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    Doug, I have questions about your proposed ID requirement of a lease or mortgage statement or utility bill.

    What if you live with someone else? You might be an adult living with your parents, or a parent living with your children. You might be living with a friend or other relative. You might be a caretaker living with an elderly or disabled person.

    For that matter, you might be homeless, but living in a certain area.

    Aren’t all of these hypothetical people entitled to vote? I mean, assuming that they are citizens. I know people in several of these categories.

    Good questions all.  Regarding homeless folks voting, if you have no residence then you have no legal address.  Hence, you are not a legal resident and no, you can’t register to vote.  You must prove that you reside in a legal jurisdiction in order to vote.  No legal residence, no registration.  Living on the street or in a tent in a public park is not a legal residence

    If you live with others (child, caretaker, roommate) then no, a lease, mortgage statement or utility bill may not establish any official residence, but you still have a driver’s license, which in all states, to my knowledge, is a requirement after establishing residence if you drive a car.  (You must register your vehicle as well.)   If you are a caregiver or roommate, you can insist on a simple lease or sublease agreement, even if the rent is nominal and the term is month to month.  It is an easy way to establish legal residence.  In AZ, most residential leases must be signed by all roommates, individually and jointly, but it doesn’t have to be that strict.

    OK, so you are a person living on a friend’s couch, with no lease, a license from another state and you pay cash rent, if any.  See my homeless discussion above.  You are not a permanent legal resident.  You cannot register to vote.

    • #8
  9. Gary Robbins Member
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    This is a great post!  It shows stuff that should be tightened up and has proposals to do so.  How receptive is the legislature to this?  This will cost more money, but having my fellow Ricochetti feel more comfortable is really important to me.

    I have one concern.  My signature has evolved over time.  If my signature gets kicked out, I want to be able to cure that defect.  One back-up would be for people to provide their driver’s license number and/or official state ID on the outside envelope.

    These are great solutions.  Sign me up!

    This post needs to go to the Main Feed.  It represents the best of Ricochet!

    • #9
  10. Doug Kimball Thatcher
    Doug Kimball
    @DougKimball

    Update:  The Motor-Voter legislation passed during Clinton’s first term with majorities in both houses prohibited any citizenship documentation requirement for federal voter registration.  GA, AZ, AL and KS, in defiance of this law, all subsequently passed a documentation requirement.  AZ did so very recently and the Feds have sued, citing its conflict with federal statute.  Gov. Doucey has ignored this lawsuit and has ordered the state law to be enforced.  So this will be adjudicated, and AZ said it will fight this all the way to the SCOTUS.  This assumes the Republicans retain the governorship as the case will not likely find final resolution before 2023.   If this case goes all the way to the SCOTUS, its resolution is hardly predictible.  

    • #10
  11. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Update: The Motor-Voter legislation passed during Clinton’s first term with majorities in both houses prohibited any citizenship documentation requirement for federal voter registration. GA, AZ, AL and KS, in defiance of this law, all subsequently passed a documentation requirement. AZ did so very recently and the Feds have sued, citing its conflict with federal statute. Gov. Doucey has ignored this lawsuit and has ordered the state law to be enforced. So this will be adjudicated, and AZ said it will fight this all the way to the SCOTUS. This assumes the Republicans retain the governorship as the case will not likely find final resolution before 2023. If this case goes all the way to the SCOTUS, its resolution is hardly predictible.

    I’d like to see SCOTUS rule that there are really no federal elections.  House and Senate elections are for STATE representation, and for President the STATE is selecting electors to represent the STATE at the Electoral College.

    • #11
  12. I Walton Member
    I Walton
    @IWalton

    The capitals are where most of the rot is.   Once we learn that Republicans are not allowed to win, what do we do? Leave?   The main challenge would be defense from the Democrat controlled Washington and Pentagon and form the Chinese.   They’ll work together and as challenging as that will be, it is not as difficult as freeing the country from both of the them once elections don’t matter.  We’ve got to win the house or senate in November or this is the challenge we (indeed the world) will face. 

    • #12
  13. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Perhaps mail-in voting could work if it were paired with an annual census. No system will ever be perfect, especially one that aims to protect the secret ballot, which is almost as important as election integrity. But in Massachusetts, we conduct an annual census, and it provides a check on the voting lists that are produced from our voter registration practices. 

    • #13
  14. The Cynthonian Member
    The Cynthonian
    @TheCynthonian

    @dougkimball, would you please put this in the form of a letter/email to all the AZ GOP legislative incumbents and nominees for the November election, plus the statewide candidates?  I think these are excellent suggestions.

    • #14
  15. Raxxalan Member
    Raxxalan
    @Raxxalan

    @dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls?  I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue.  I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time.  I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    • #15
  16. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    What do you mean, “could be?”

    • #16
  17. Raxxalan Member
    Raxxalan
    @Raxxalan

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    What do you mean, “could be?”

    I don’t have any evidence they are in AZ.  In TX it is a long tradition capitalized on by LBJ most famously.

    • #17
  18. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    What do you mean, “could be?”

    I don’t have any evidence they are in AZ. In TX it is a long tradition capitalized on by LBJ most famously.

    When I lived in Arizona (for 30 years), at each election there were reports of registration confirmation postcards (including/especially for same-day registration) coming back “undeliverable,” “no such address,” etc.  Of course by then it was too late to disqualify their votes even if the officials wanted to do so, which they didn’t.  And they never really even looked at the problem, so they could claim “no problems with fraud” to the media.  Occasionally some private people would do some checking and would always find a fairly large number of these.

    • #18
  19. Raxxalan Member
    Raxxalan
    @Raxxalan

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    What do you mean, “could be?”

    I don’t have any evidence they are in AZ. In TX it is a long tradition capitalized on by LBJ most famously.

    When I lived in Arizona (for 30 years), at each election there were reports of registration confirmation postcards (including/especially for same-day registration) coming back “undeliverable,” “no such address,” etc. Of course by then it was too late to disqualify their votes even if the officials wanted to do so, which they didn’t. And they never really even looked at the problem, so they could claim “no problems with fraud” to the media. Occasionally some private people would do some checking and would always find a fairly large number of these.

    Yep.  Doesn’t surprise me.  I think voter rolls need to be purged fairly regularly.  Many never are.  It makes it easy to fabricate seemly legitimate ballots.  We know this was happening widescale in WI in assisted living facilities.

    • #19
  20. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

     

    What do you mean, “could be?”

    I don’t have any evidence they are in AZ. In TX it is a long tradition capitalized on by LBJ most famously.

    When I lived in Arizona (for 30 years), at each election there were reports of registration confirmation postcards (including/especially for same-day registration) coming back “undeliverable,” “no such address,” etc. Of course by then it was too late to disqualify their votes even if the officials wanted to do so, which they didn’t. And they never really even looked at the problem, so they could claim “no problems with fraud” to the media. Occasionally some private people would do some checking and would always find a fairly large number of these.

    Yep. Doesn’t surprise me. I think voter rolls need to be purged fairly regularly. Many never are. It makes it easy to fabricate seemly legitimate ballots. We know this was happening widescale in WI in assisted living facilities.

    The biggest problem seems to be that there are no actual penalties for not doing so, even by court order.  Last I heard, “contempt of court” is supposed to be a jailable offense, but it never seems to happen, at least not in those cases.  Maybe if some Secretaries of State went to jail for not doing their job, things might change.  (Except there are those on the left who would view it as a badge of honor.)

    • #20
  21. Doug Kimball Thatcher
    Doug Kimball
    @DougKimball

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

    I’m not familiar with what the AZ statutes have to say about voter rolls, but they likely need to be updated given today’s technology.  Certainly there should be some random, statistical, affirmative check of residence.  And there should be links to other government databases like the MVD, deaths and Post Office address change directives.  The federal government could be of use here as well.  How about a federal law where new registrants are required to provide their prior legal address?  This information could be shared among all jurisdictions/states so that roles might be purged of duplicates (and to prosecute double voting fraud.)  If registered voters are not active for some number of years, statuatorily there should be some attempt to verify their status as a live, active voter.  In addition, we need to make it easy for registered voters to check their registration status.  There is always the problem of common names (there are three Doug Kimballs in AZ that I know of) so there need to be specific procedures for dealing with that.  And there is always the provisional ballot for those inadvertantly purged from the roles.

    • #21
  22. The Cynthonian Member
    The Cynthonian
    @TheCynthonian

    There’s also the issue of registered voters dying in a state other than the one they’re registered in, especially in a state with a significant population of snowbirds, like AZ.  There needs to be a death certificate cross-check for that, such as there is for motor vehicle registrations in pretty much every state except CA (unless they’ve changed it very recently).

    • #22
  23. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

    I’m not familiar with what the AZ statutes have to say about voter rolls, but they likely need to be updated given today’s technology. Certainly there should be some random, statistical, affirmative check of residence. And there should be links to other government databases like the MVD, deaths and Post Office address change directives. The federal government could be of use here as well. How about a federal law where new registrants are required to provide their prior legal address? This information could be shared among all jurisdictions/states so that roles might be purged of duplicates (and to prosecute double voting fraud.) If registered voters are not active for some number of years, statuatorily there should be some attempt to verify their status as a live, active voter. In addition, we need to make it easy for registered voters to check their registration status. There is always the problem of common names (there are three Doug Kimballs in AZ that I know of) so there need to be specific procedures for dealing with that. And there is always the provisional ballot for those inadvertantly purged from the roles.

    For several months when I lived in Arizona, I lived NEXT DOOR to someone with the same name as me.  That was her married name, but still….  and it was in Wittmann, of all places!  Population still under 1000, as of 2020 census.

    • #23
  24. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

    I’m not familiar with what the AZ statutes have to say about voter rolls, but they likely need to be updated given today’s technology. Certainly there should be some random, statistical, affirmative check of residence. And there should be links to other government databases like the MVD, deaths and Post Office address change directives. The federal government could be of use here as well. How about a federal law where new registrants are required to provide their prior legal address? This information could be shared among all jurisdictions/states so that roles might be purged of duplicates (and to prosecute double voting fraud.) If registered voters are not active for some number of years, statuatorily there should be some attempt to verify their status as a live, active voter. In addition, we need to make it easy for registered voters to check their registration status. There is always the problem of common names (there are three Doug Kimballs in AZ that I know of) so there need to be specific procedures for dealing with that. And there is always the provisional ballot for those inadvertantly purged from the roles.

    How about we just do away with “mail-in” ballots, require a legal and current photo ID, and vote in person with a paper ballot? Problem solved. 

    • #24
  25. Doug Kimball Thatcher
    Doug Kimball
    @DougKimball

    cdor (View Comment):

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):

    Raxxalan (View Comment):

    @ dougkimball as someone who has clearly given this a lot of thought what are your thoughts on purging/ updating voter rolls? I would think that now a days death certificates could be linked to a voter roll and purged automatically, but people moving may be an issue. I have several friends who still get absentee ballots from their old addresses from time to time. I imagine if those rolls aren’t purged those could be used to commit voter fraud.

    I’m not familiar with what the AZ statutes have to say about voter rolls, but they likely need to be updated given today’s technology. Certainly there should be some random, statistical, affirmative check of residence. And there should be links to other government databases like the MVD, deaths and Post Office address change directives. The federal government could be of use here as well. How about a federal law where new registrants are required to provide their prior legal address? This information could be shared among all jurisdictions/states so that roles might be purged of duplicates (and to prosecute double voting fraud.) If registered voters are not active for some number of years, statuatorily there should be some attempt to verify their status as a live, active voter. In addition, we need to make it easy for registered voters to check their registration status. There is always the problem of common names (there are three Doug Kimballs in AZ that I know of) so there need to be specific procedures for dealing with that. And there is always the provisional ballot for those inadvertantly purged from the roles.

    How about we just do away with “mail-in” ballots, require a legal and current photo ID, and vote in person with a paper ballot? Problem solved.

    I’m with you there.  AZ does, in fact, require a paper ballot.  As for photo ID, there are awkward alternatives which should be eliminated, and none for mail-in ballots, just a signature check.  AZ does allow early, in person voting.  Those early polls are closed on the Friday before election day.  I’m in agreement that wholesale mail-in voting is problematic.  I’d like to go back to specific, one-time, for cause absentee ballots.  The mandatory return date for an absentee ballot should allow enough time to process and count that ballot before election day.  Absentee voters need to be told that by selecting this one time status, they have given up their right to in-person voting and must comply with the early deadlines for returning their ballots.  Absentee ballots should be returned to a single cental poll location for processing.  On election day, every polling station’s voter list should indicate voters who have already returned absentee ballots.  If an absentee voter arrives to vote on election day, provides ID, requests a ballot, and tries to vote, the voter can be given a provisional ballot recording the reason for this step.  If the voter signs an affidavit indicating that an absentee ballot application was never requested and the resultant vote should be voided, it may be replaced with a provisional ballot to be later counted under the theory that in-person ID and signature check should over-ride an early ballot.  There should be follow-up in every instance to determine if fraud was acually committed.  Absentee ballots that arrive after the proscribed date should be scanned as returned late, voided and franked so that they are not counted.

    And there is, of course, the problem of counting.  Machines or manual?  I think we’re stuck with machine counts as our elections are so complex.  Machines, of course, do not guarantee accuracy, but they can be checked and tested periodically.

    • #25
  26. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):
    And the is, of course, the problem of counting.  Machines or manual?  I think we’re stuck with machine counts as our elections are so complex.  Machines, of course, do not guarantee accuracy, but they can be checked and tested periodically.  

    Votes can be machine-counted by machines that are much less complicated – and much less subject to shenanigans – than full-blown computers that might be programmed to handle fractional voting in certain situations, etc.

    • #26
  27. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):
    And the is, of course, the problem of counting. Machines or manual? I think we’re stuck with machine counts as our elections are so complex. Machines, of course, do not guarantee accuracy, but they can be checked and tested periodically.

    Votes can be machine-counted by machines that are much less complicated – and much less subject to shenanigans – than full-blown computers that might be programmed to handle fractional voting in certain situations, etc.

    No internet connectivity. So the news networks have to wait for someone to sneaker-net a memory stick over to another box. Big deal.

    • #27
  28. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Doug Kimball (View Comment):
    And the is, of course, the problem of counting. Machines or manual? I think we’re stuck with machine counts as our elections are so complex. Machines, of course, do not guarantee accuracy, but they can be checked and tested periodically.

    Votes can be machine-counted by machines that are much less complicated – and much less subject to shenanigans – than full-blown computers that might be programmed to handle fractional voting in certain situations, etc.

    No internet connectivity. So the news networks have to wait for someone to sneaker-net a memory stick over to another box. Big deal.

    Simple vote-counting machines couldn’t use memory sticks either.

    • #28
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