Small Towns Do Big Things (aka, America Is OK)

 

A text from my sister prompted this post.  She lives in a small, rural mountain town in Maryland.  It read as follows: “We had a luncheon after church for our lead singer/guitarist.  He is moving to Williamsburg, VA.  We are also taking a collection for a church in the Kentucky floods.  A couple is going down to take the supplies and funds.”

I asked my sister, is that the chubby guy that sings? I remembered him, as I watched those church services online during Covid.  Her pastor’s very encouraging and passionate sermons were an inspiration during that time, and I remembered this talented musician.

Here’s a sample about six minutes into the video:

https://gracememorial.net/sermons/a-key-sign-indicating-the-end-times/

She said, “He’s taking an Assistant Pastor position and she’s sure he’ll use his music in his ministry somehow.  She also said she sees a lot of people “stepping out on faith”…  I wanted to think about that statement, because I have been reading about others doing the same – going into the trenches – the front lines – doing everyday small things with big results, that usually go un-noticed under the radar.

https://www.crisismagazine.com/2021/the-victim-who-vanished

She said they’re taking up a collection for the people in Kentucky suffering because of floods.

https://www.npr.org/2022/08/05/1116036174/eastern-kentucky-floods-recovery-efforts

We recently moved to central Florida from the Panhandle, but through the few hurricanes, especially the devastating Hurricane Michael,  local people, counties, and surrounding states rose immediately to help…..with food, fuel, clothing, and resources, and it didn’t stop until communities and families were finally put back together.

Did I mention we moved to central Florida from the Panhandle?  We are among the fortunate, to have sold our previous modest house for a bundle, and move to a beautiful area where the sun shines every morning.  No kidding….but we’re experiencing a culture shock.  I feel like we left the South (of which Kentucky is part of), and landed in an area where I hear more New York accents and see more CA license plates than I’m used to.  I hope the politics don’t follow suit.

A few days ago, I suddenly felt an extreme urge to go to Cracker Barrel.  I wanted simple country food, and a dining room that never changes.  My husband and I played the peg game, and placed our orders: Country-fried steak with white gravy, green beans and biscuits, cornbread, fried okra, and turnip greens with ham.  The waitress kept pouring the sweet tea.

As I ate my meal, I watched through the window to the parking lot, a young girl changing the diaper of her toddler at the back of her SUV.  She hustled her freshly-bottomed daughter, and her two little boys to a table.  They sat well-behaved as she pulled out markers and coloring books, and handed her phone to the toddler who was just content to handle it.  I watched her as she smiled with love, and coordinated their activities as their dinner was being ordered – a mother content to be so.

I looked around the dining room – a Hispanic mom and her brood also contently eating a meal, elderly couples silently sharing their dinner, a young man picking up take out for his family – loading up the bags in the back of his car on the way home from work.

I was reminded that in small towns all over our country, mothers are tending to their children, churches and communities are not waiting for government direction, but are answering a call – lifting up those under stress, whether by extreme weather conditions, or food pantries stocking up to sock inflation in the eye; just everyday folks living life, creating families, going to work, sharing their time, talents and resources, and thanking God each day – no matter what.  These are also the folks that are driving the semis, delivering food, fuel, and consumer goods to our grocery store shelves, and farmers still putting down seed to feed us, and tending to their cattle.  Support them.

Small towns doing big things is why I believe America will be ok.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

There are 18 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Thanks, FSC.  I needed a stiff dose of this right now.

    • #1
  2. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Thanks, FSC. I needed a stiff dose of this right now.

    Amen.  Thank you.

    And you’re exactly right.  It’s easy to forget that America is just overflowing with good, solid people.

    May God continue to bless the United States of America.

    • #2
  3. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Please see the link of the service and the music about six minutes in – I added late…..

    • #3
  4. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Great post, FSC. That’s the America I love.

    Can I ask where you are in Central FL–or PM me?

    • #4
  5. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Great post, FSC. That’s the America I love.

    Can I ask where you are in Central FL–or PM me?

    Lakewood Ranch

    • #5
  6. Scott Wilmot Member
    Scott Wilmot
    @ScottWilmot

    I love Cracker Barrel and the people who go to Cracker Barrel – this is America. What a beautiful country.

    • #6
  7. CACrabtree Coolidge
    CACrabtree
    @CACrabtree

    Speaking of small towns:

    https://youtu.be/0CVLVaBECuc

    The town that I was born in has a population of about 250 and the town I retired to has somewhere around 1000.  

    Wouldn’t have it any other way…

    • #7
  8. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Great post, FSC. That’s the America I love.

    Can I ask where you are in Central FL–or PM me?

    Lakewood Ranch

    Maybe it’s time to consider a Ricochet meet-up in the Fall or early winter?

    • #8
  9. GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms Reagan
    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms
    @GLDIII

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Great post, FSC. That’s the America I love.

    Can I ask where you are in Central FL–or PM me?

    Lakewood Ranch

    Maybe it’s time to consider a Ricochet meet-up in the Fall or early winter?

    I will be in Florida starting Nov 2nd (near Sebastian) for several months. I will be out of country w/ the folks going on the NR cruise Nov 12th to 19th. Would love to meet some of the various Ricochette that dwell in America’s freest state.

    • #9
  10. Juliana Member
    Juliana
    @Juliana

    We just moved to a small town in Iowa (out of the Twin Cities in Minnesota). I can go to the bank without an appointment, get to the grocery store, or church, or Dairy Queen by car in six minutes or less, and walk to the bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. Amenities such as restaurants and retail are limited, but right now, not very necessary. People are just so nice here. 

    I have noticed that some of the more run down houses for sale are being purchased- and I would assumed flipped. There is a market for them. Not exactly gentrification, but a sprucing-up. There is industry and agriculture. There are new small businesses giving it a try. Long-time residents have told us about how the town is dying, and maybe they know better, but it could be that it is just changing to something different than what they remember. It won’t be the same, but it can still be good.

    • #10
  11. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Juliana (View Comment):

    We just moved to a small town in Iowa (out of the Twin Cities in Minnesota). I can go to the bank without an appointment, get to the grocery store, or church, or Dairy Queen by car in six minutes or less, and walk to the bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. Amenities such as restaurants and retail are limited, but right now, not very necessary. People are just so nice here.

    I have noticed that some of the more run down houses for sale are being purchased- and I would assumed flipped. There is a market for them. Not exactly gentrification, but a sprucing-up. There is industry and agriculture. There are new small businesses giving it a try. Long-time residents have told us about how the town is dying, and maybe they know better, but it could be that it is just changing to something different than what they remember. It won’t be the same, but it can still be good.

    I hope so – the same is going on in my sister’s area, a revitalization of their old little downtown which fizzled out when “the mall” opened.  I’d be curious what those homes you describe sold for and who purchased. You could look it up on your appraiser site. In the Panhandle, property was being bought up by corporations and “foreign” investment……it has become unaffordable, even rent is too much.

    • #11
  12. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    CACrabtree (View Comment):

    Speaking of small towns:

    https://youtu.be/0CVLVaBECuc

    The town that I was born in has a population of about 250 and the town I retired to has somewhere around 1000.

    Wouldn’t have it any other way…

    Why does John Mellencamp sound like an oldie now? :-)  The good ol days.

    • #12
  13. Foghorn Coolidge
    Foghorn
    @Dave Rogers

    I too live in a small town. This is in the Allegheny Mountains of SW PA. When I was deployed to Puerto Rico in response to Hurricane Maria my wife had a problem with the lock & handle on the front door. I called the company in town who does all my plumbing, heating and AC work. Christy told me to forget about it & get back to work. She would send John up & fix it. We’ll talk about the bill when you get home. 

    When we were burying our son we didn’t cook a meal for almost two weeks and had to turn down more offers than we ever imagined. 

    Like others I can get to our 1 grocery store, visit the bank where they call me by name when I walk in the door and get to the Sunday night band concert in the center of town all in a 2 minute drive or 5-10 minute walk from home.

    This town is full of really good people regardless of how they vote and we all take care of each other here.

    • #13
  14. OkieSailor Member
    OkieSailor
    @OkieSailor

    Glasgow, KY where we moved for retirement 7 years ago has grown from 20,000 to 25,000 and has a shortage of housing now, even though there is a shortage of good jobs. People here are just naturally friendly and look out for their neighbors and friends. Events on the square are well attended and a local group, “Far Off Broadway” produces a couple of live plays each year (none during Covid though) using local talent which we enjoy.  We are close enough to any shopping we ever need just 30 miles away in Bowling Green but still can enjoy peace and quiet on an acre outside town. Relocating has been a joy for us in many ways especially in rediscovering real folks in Real America.

    • #14
  15. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Foghorn (View Comment):

    I too live in a small town. This is in the Allegheny Mountains of SW PA. When I was deployed to Puerto Rico in response to Hurricane Maria my wife had a problem with the lock & handle on the front door. I called the company in town who does all my plumbing, heating and AC work. Christy told me to forget about it & get back to work. She would send John up & fix it. We’ll talk about the bill when you get home.

    When we were burying our son we didn’t cook a meal for almost two weeks and had to turn down more offers than we ever imagined.

    Like others I can get to our 1 grocery store, visit the bank where they call me by name when I walk in the door and get to the Sunday night band concert in the center of town all in a 2 minute drive or 5-10 minute walk from home.

    This town is full of really good people regardless of how they vote and we all take care of each other here.

    What town is that Foghorn?

    • #15
  16. Foghorn Coolidge
    Foghorn
    @Dave Rogers

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Foghorn (View Comment):

    I too live in a small town. This is in the Allegheny Mountains of SW PA. When I was deployed to Puerto Rico in response to Hurricane Maria my wife had a problem with the lock & handle on the front door. I called the company in town who does all my plumbing, heating and AC work. Christy told me to forget about it & get back to work. She would send John up & fix it. We’ll talk about the bill when you get home.

    When we were burying our son we didn’t cook a meal for almost two weeks and had to turn down more offers than we ever imagined.

    Like others I can get to our 1 grocery store, visit the bank where they call me by name when I walk in the door and get to the Sunday night band concert in the center of town all in a 2 minute drive or 5-10 minute walk from home.

    This town is full of really good people regardless of how they vote and we all take care of each other here.

    What town is that Foghorn?

    Ligonier. Fantastic place 

    • #16
  17. Tedley Member
    Tedley
    @Tedley

    Front Seat Cat: Country-fried steak with white gravy, green beans and biscuits, cornbread, fried okra, and turnip greens with ham.

    This gets me salivating.  I didn’t grow up with this kind of cuisine, but ever since I tried it, I can’t have enough! I’m looking forward to at least one serving when I visit the states in a couple of months.

    • #17
  18. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Tedley (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat: Country-fried steak with white gravy, green beans and biscuits, cornbread, fried okra, and turnip greens with ham.

    This gets me salivating. I didn’t grow up with this kind of cuisine, but ever since I tried it, I can’t have enough! I’m looking forward to at least one serving when I visit the states in a couple of months.

    Where are you coming from Tedley? We’ll leave a light on for you.

    • #18
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.