Deaths Could Be Attributed to Environmentalists

 

In Washington State, we have a number of dormant volcanoes in the Cascade Range, including the famous Mount St. Helens, Mt. Rainier, and Mt. Baker.  However, the most dangerous today is the little-known Glacier Peak in the north part of the state, northeast of our home in Everett.  The volcano is known to have erupted just 2,000 years ago, and even today it sometimes emits steam.  Seismologists place electronic monitors on dangerous volcanoes and then watch for clusters of little earthquakes that may signal an impending eruption (that was what happened in 1980 with St. Helens).

Recently, the US Forest Service was processing a request from local seismologists to install more monitors on Glacier Peak, described as the “most dangerous of Cascade volcanoes”, than just the one that has been there for years.  Glacier Peak is located in a wilderness area, and is not accessible enough for tourists to visit.  There were actually objections to the new monitors being placed on the mountain.  Who, you ask, would object to seismic monitors that might save thousands of people from being buried in volcanic mud in an eruption?

The objections came from the usual suspects-environmental groups who object to the helicopters that would be needed to carry scientists to the mountain to place the new monitors.  They always and everywhere object to helicopters in their precious wilderness, for any reason, even for the very short time it would take to install the monitors.  The “environmentalists” value the wilderness more than the many lives of people living in the affected area, and more than the scientists (real scientists!) who keep track of potential volcanic activity to protect the public.

It is fortunate that the Forest Service approved the placement of the new monitors, over the objections of the radicals who value trees more than people.

The U.S. Forest Service determined the project would have no significant impact on the environment. Two groups opposed the use of helicopters in a wilderness area. The Forest Service considered a “full range of alternatives” in making the decision to move forward. Crews carry equipment in backpacks, cutting down on flight time.

I visited the website of the US Geological Service, and they have wonderful maps and photos of the surrounding area, and a lahar diagram of where eruptions would cause the most damage.  The website has some spectacular photos, including this one of little peaks that show the columnar basalt produced when lave flows cool quickly.

The “environmental groups” should be ashamed of themselves for objecting to valuable scientific activity designed to warn people to evacuate if an eruption might be imminent.  And that volcano could do a lot more damage than a helicopter to their precious wilderness!

Published in Environment
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  1. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    These idiots have to concoct things to be outraged about.

    • #1
  2. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    This is somehow reminiscent of Elizabeth Warren’s “People Will Die” speech.

    • #2
  3. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    This is somehow reminiscent of Elizabeth Warren’s “People Will Die” speech.

    Remy is always good. That one was great!

    • #3
  4. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    They want people to die. To them, people are a plague, an infestation.

    • #4
  5. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Arahant (View Comment):

    They want people to die. To them, people are a plague, an infestation.

    Their votes are more reliable once they’re dead.

    • #5
  6. Spin Coolidge
    Spin
    @Spin

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time.  And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.  

    • #6
  7. Phil Turmel Coolidge
    Phil Turmel
    @PhilTurmel

    RushBabe49: The “environmental groups” should be ashamed of themselves

    Yes, they should.  I’m not holding my breath.

    • #7
  8. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Spin (View Comment):

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time. And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.

    Well, Rainier ain’t bad from the east side… when it’s not cloud-covered.

    • #8
  9. Paul Stinchfield Member
    Paul Stinchfield
    @PaulStinchfield

    Arahant (View Comment):

    … To them, people are a plague, an infestation.

    Literally, not metaphorically, what some of them believe.

    • #9
  10. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Spin (View Comment):

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time. And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.

    And your place is right in the line of fire for Mt Baker if it blew. 

    • #10
  11. Gary Robbins Member
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    And Democrats keep wondering why they keep losing as they support asine ideas like this personal pronouns.

    • #11
  12. The Great Adventure Coolidge
    The Great Adventure
    @TGA

    Spin (View Comment):

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time. And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.

    At least that’s one area where Oregon tops Washington. Mt Hood is the most beautiful of all of the Cascades. At least since St Helens blew its lid. 

    • #12
  13. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    I must admit the volcano evacuation route signs did give me a start. If if that doesn’t make you think, I was hiking a trail at Mt. Rainier last year and there was warm water coming out some cracks in the rocks. I saw that if it blows in the winter, the sludge will make it to Seattle. 

    I couldn’t live near volcanoes that are due to blow. (Says someone living in SC where there have been earthquake swarms since December)

    • #13
  14. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Mount St. Helens today

    • #14
  15. Bunsen Coolidge
    Bunsen
    @Bunsen

    Is it bad to say I would trade my tornados in ILLinois for your views of volcanos?

    • #15
  16. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    The Great Adventure (View Comment):

    Spin (View Comment):

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time. And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.

    At least that’s one area where Oregon tops Washington. Mt Hood is the most beautiful of all of the Cascades. At least since St Helens blew its lid.

    Hear! Hear!

    • #16
  17. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    The environmental movement has a long history of trading human death for their green goals.   First and foremost are the 60 million deaths worldwide from malaria since DDT was banned.   At the time of the ban, malaria was in dramatic decline and in the verge of eradication in some places.   

    • #17
  18. The Great Adventure Coolidge
    The Great Adventure
    @TGA

    On a clear day (definitely not guaranteed in the PNW) flying into Portland from the East is spectacular.  You look out the right side of the plane and you get a great view of Baker, Rainier, Adams, and St Helens.  Out the right side of the plane you get Hood (so close you feel like you can reach out and touch it), Jefferson, 3 Fingered Jack, the 3 Sisters.  On a REALLY clear day you can spot Shasta down in California.  

    It’s fun to watch the newbies who haven’t flown in there before, then tell them “Yeah, amazing aren’t they?  And every one of them is a volcano!”

    Some interesting quick reads:

    On the Cascades Volcanoes 

    On Mt Hood specifically

    On Mt Rainier

    I was in college at the U of Oregon (Eugene, about 150 miles south) when St Helens blew in 1980.  The blast woke me up that morning, but since this was pre-internet days I didn’t know what it had been until hours later.  The gigantic ash cloud from that eruption went primarily east, and if you head out into E Washington you can still see some patches of ash alongside the freeway.  As you drive I-5 between Seattle and Portland you’ll cross over the Cowlitz river and you’ll notice that it is passing between 2 large mounds on the west side of the freeway.  They’re covered with vegetation now, but it is sobering to realize that they’re made up of ash that was dredged from the river.

     

    • #18
  19. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    The environmental movement has a long history of trading human death for their green goals. First and foremost are the 60 million deaths worldwide from malaria since DDT was banned. At the time of the ban, malaria was in dramatic decline and in the verge of eradication in some places.

    In terms of body count, Silent Spring is up there with Mein Kampf , Das Kapital and Mao’s Little Red Book 

    • #19
  20. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Tell the enviros the monitors are being put there to prove climate change and they’ll shut up . . .

    • #20
  21. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Why can’t I “Like” this post?  The option is not there

    • #21
  22. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Arahant (View Comment):

    They want people to die. To them, people are a plague, an infestation.

    …………

    They do. I mean Man occurs in Nature too, just like any white-tailed deer or antelope, but they act like we’re a deadly virus from Outer Space.  In grade school, they taught my daughter that the Earth was a pristine place until filthy old Man came along and ruined it.  And then the teacher followed that with Self-Esteem Hour (not even kidding).  They wouldn’t NEED Self-Esteem Hour if you hadn’t made them feel guilty and bad for being born, ya dumb hippie

    • #22
  23. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    Why can’t I “Like” this post? The option is not there

    It appears that when the post has been recommended, it can’t be liked until it is promoted. This is a theory.

    • #23
  24. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    Percival (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    Why can’t I “Like” this post? The option is not there

    It appears that when the post has been recommended, it can’t be liked until it is promoted. This is a theory.

    It is on the main feed now.

    • #24
  25. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Red Herring (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    Why can’t I “Like” this post? The option is not there

    It appears that when the post has been recommended, it can’t be liked until it is promoted. This is a theory.

    It is on the main feed now.

    I suspect a coding problem, perhaps only with certain browsers.

    • #25
  26. Spin Coolidge
    Spin
    @Spin

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Spin (View Comment):

    I would just like to say that Mt. Baker also lets off steam from time to time. And that it is the most beautiful of Washington’s mountains.

    And your place is right in the line of fire for Mt Baker if it blew.

    I married native, so I’m safe. 

    • #26
  27. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    I liked environmentalism when it was “conservation”. The idea being that you took steps to preserve resources for future generations. Now it is just anti-people leftism.

    • #27
  28. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Rodin (View Comment):

    I liked environmentalism when it was “conservation”. The idea being that you took steps to preserve resources for future generations. Now it is just anti-people leftism.

    Watermelons. Green on the outside, red on the inside.

    • #28
  29. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    I climbed Glacier Peak in the 1980s. It is a lovely area, beautiful and remote. My climbing partners and I were the only people on the mountain on those days (it took two days to complete the climb.) Why anyone would be concerned about scientists using a helicopter to get in and get out strikes me as absurd. I am sure those same “environmentalists” wouldn’t be bothered if Mountain Rescue had to use a helicopter to bring one of them out following an accident, something that isn’t uncommon on any of the glaciated volcanos in the Cascades. The very remoteness of the peak and the long approach would necessitate the use of a bird to bring out an injured climber. Just as a reference Mount Rainier is also in what is considered a national wilderness area. As a member of Mountain Rescue Council I flew into the National Park to retrieve injured climbers from the slopes of Rainier. I don’t recall anyone complaining about a helicopter flying into the Wilderness on those occasions.

    Glacier Peak is pretty much smack-dab in the middle of the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area. Keeping a weather eye on any seismic activity on this 10,000 foot peak is certainly justification for the use of a helicopter and remote sensors.

    • #29
  30. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Watermelons. Green on the outside, red on the inside.

    I’m stealing this.

    • #30
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