‘Evil’ Season 3 and Why I’m a Better Catholic for Watching It

 

I’m going to keep this short, sweet, and to the point. I’m a failed Catholic. We all are, in that none of us are perfect. I didn’t get married in the Church because the bureaucracy makes me angry. I’m frustrated by marriage preparation and timelines and insistence upon brick and mortar … unless you have enough money.

And so, I was married by a former Catholic priest with similar gripes. With my family, under the sky and a canopy of sequoias, I stated the same vows I would have in the Church but still with a man sanctified and called by God.

Again, I’m not a good Catholic, but a practicing one. I practice because I’m just not very good yet. I only confess when I think I’ve done wrong and I do what I can to be a good human.

“Evil,” the TV show,  is like “The X-Files” for Catholics. It’s about what happens that is between science and faith, who has ownership, why, and what it means.

When I saw the Season 3 promos that promised consummation between the priest and his friend (despite her being married and his vows), I felt like it was clichéd. I was tired and I wanted no part of the usual “priest can’t resist love/sex” thing.

In my boredom, I started watching anyway.

I was relieved to see that they didn’t play the trope. Instead, it is spiritual trickery, desire, demonic presence, and our normal human failings. I was so relieved;  I kept watching.

As a Catholic, I have to commend the makers. They have made it neither bizarre superstition or old custom, but genuine faith and practice of real people with real lives and real questions.

For that, I am grateful.

And for that, it has inspired me to pray my Rosary, look to the mysteries, and to be closer to the faith. Though I have trouble believing, God help me believe. Mary, who said yes, let me also say yes. In spite of everything, say yes to life and whatever comes with faith that my practices and religion have given me proper tools that when confronted, when cynical, when doubting, I still say yes.

Even reluctantly and warily.

I say yes.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure …: I was relieved to see that they didn’t play the trope.

    Unusual.

    • #1
  2. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Arahant (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure …: I was relieved to see that they didn’t play the trope.

    Unusual.

    Rare, right?  I thought,  “oh. The typical priest falls to temptation…” but it’s more complex.

    • #2
  3. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    God bless you Nurse – we all fall short daily.  You are on the right track!

    • #3
  4. Roderic Reagan
    Roderic
    @rhfabian

    I’ll have to give that TV show a look.  It seems the promos don’t do it justice.

    • #4
  5. Marjorie Reynolds Coolidge
    Marjorie Reynolds
    @MarjorieReynolds

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure …: I was relieved to see that they didn’t play the trope.

    Unusual.

    Rare, right? I thought, “oh. The typical priest falls to temptation…” but it’s more complex.

    So it’s not the Thornbirds then?

    • #5
  6. CACrabtree Coolidge
    CACrabtree
    @CACrabtree

    You’re not a “failed Catholic”.  Like many of us, you merely have some issues with authority figures. Just keep the faith; don’t let a bureaucrat try to take it from you…

    • #6
  7. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    I practice because I’m just not very good yet.

    Good one! I might have to steal it

    • #7
  8. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    You, and the rest of us are all works in progress.

    • #8
  9. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    Roderic (View Comment):

    I’ll have to give that TV show a look. It seems the promos don’t do it justice.

    I watched the series premiere back when it first aired, and wasn’t impressed enough to keep watching. But maybe it gets better. 

    • #9
  10. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”  (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse.  It sounds like you have that.  We all fall short.  I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church.  Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    • #10
  11. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can.  It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    • #11
  12. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    Re: post and #9

    “I practice because I’m just not very good yet”

    Excellent, arresting post !

    What episodes from what seasons would you, The Right Nurse, and you, Joseph Stanko, recommend ? What episodes would anyone recommend ?

    After reading this, I watched episode 1 of season 1.

    I very much liked the photography. Wasn’t at all expecting the way the story turned out. I’m actually thinking of watching that episode again. Anyway, I’d like to watch one or two more with my better half tonight.

    • #12
  13. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy?  I fail to understand.  They have to record your marriage.  But other than that, what else is there?

    • #13
  14. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Ansonia (View Comment):

    Re: post and #9

    “I practice because I’m just not very good yet”

    Excellent, arresting post !

    What episodes from what seasons would you, The Right Nurse, and you, Joseph Stanko, recommend ? What episodes would anyone recommend ?

    After reading this, I watched episode 1 of season 1.

    I very much liked the photography. Wasn’t at all expecting the way the story turned out. I’m actually thinking of watching that episode again. Anyway, I’d like to watch one or two more with my better half tonight.

    It definitely builds.  Things happen.  People do stuff (because we’re all fallen humans).  People have guilt.  Weird things happen.

    It’s an interesting show and I have to commend them for their comedic chops, as well.  They slide it in just when things might get a little too serious or a little too intense.

    I don’t even recommend just single episodes.  In order to really have a good feel for the characters, you should start from the beginning and watch through.  BUT, in looking back at a list of episodes, ones that particularly resonated for me (because of social issues, family drama at the time, etc) were:

    Season 1, Ep. 6 about a Chinese immigrant.  I’ll just leave it at that.  Season 1, Episode 10 is about the evil of memes.  Season 2, Ep. 4 is about common childhood games designed to scare people.  

    I’d say those figure pretty highly for me.  But I’d have to rewatch them to see if they still hit the same.

     

    • #14
  15. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Manny (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy? I fail to understand. They have to record your marriage. But other than that, what else is there?

    Well, it depends on the diocese.  Many have varying rules, waiting periods, etc.  Example, even though I am legally married, I’m not really in the eyes of the Church.  I would have to go and still do the marriage preparation (perhaps an abbreviated version, again depending on diocese).  I would still have to do the coursework, wait the time period, book the church and provide a “donation” to the church according to their schedules.

    This what what I mean by bureaucracy.  

    Some dioceses will allow you to marry outside, many won’t.  It just depends on local rules, who you know, and how much you are willing to donate.

    • #15
  16. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy? I fail to understand. They have to record your marriage. But other than that, what else is there?

    Well, it depends on the diocese. Many have varying rules, waiting periods, etc. Example, even though I am legally married, I’m not really in the eyes of the Church. I would have to go and still do the marriage preparation (perhaps an abbreviated version, again depending on diocese). I would still have to do the coursework, wait the time period, book the church and provide a “donation” to the church according to their schedules.

    This what what I mean by bureaucracy.

    Some dioceses will allow you to marry outside, many won’t. It just depends on local rules, who you know, and how much you are willing to donate.

    Ok. Sounds excessive to me too. You still should want your marriage be sacramentalized. Thats what you get out of it. A sacrament is an indelible mark on your soul and binds two souls in Christ. It’s more than just exchange of vows. It’s your vows bound with Christ. 

    • #16
  17. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Manny (View Comment):
    Ok. Sounds excessive to me too. You still should want your marriage be sacramentalized. Thats what you get out of it. A sacrament is an indelible mark on your soul and binds two souls in Christ. It’s more than just exchange of vows. It’s your vows bound with Christ. 

    Well, I didn’t say I wasn’t going to do it.  I just said that the restrictions and bureaucracy are part of my various issues with the Church.  I don’t have a problem with the sacraments or Christ.

    • #17
  18. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy? I fail to understand. They have to record your marriage. But other than that, what else is there?

    Well, it depends on the diocese. Many have varying rules, waiting periods, etc. Example, even though I am legally married, I’m not really in the eyes of the Church. I would have to go and still do the marriage preparation (perhaps an abbreviated version, again depending on diocese). I would still have to do the coursework, wait the time period, book the church and provide a “donation” to the church according to their schedules.

    This what what I mean by bureaucracy.

    Some dioceses will allow you to marry outside, many won’t. It just depends on local rules, who you know, and how much you are willing to donate.

    That sounds silly.  Isn’t the main point of marriage prep courses to force couples to consider and discuss thorny issues like “how many kids do we want, will we raise them Catholic, where will we live” etc. before they tie the knot, while there’s still time to back out?  Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    • #18
  19. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Ansonia (View Comment):

    Re: post and #9

    “I practice because I’m just not very good yet”

    Excellent, arresting post !

    What episodes from what seasons would you, The Right Nurse, and you, Joseph Stanko, recommend ? What episodes would anyone recommend ?

    After reading this, I watched episode 1 of season 1.

    I very much liked the photography. Wasn’t at all expecting the way the story turned out. I’m actually thinking of watching that episode again. Anyway, I’d like to watch one or two more with my better half tonight.

    It definitely builds. Things happen. People do stuff (because we’re all fallen humans). People have guilt. Weird things happen.

    It’s an interesting show and I have to commend them for their comedic chops, as well. They slide it in just when things might get a little too serious or a little too intense.

    I don’t even recommend just single episodes. In order to really have a good feel for the characters, you should start from the beginning and watch through. BUT, in looking back at a list of episodes, ones that particularly resonated for me (because of social issues, family drama at the time, etc) were:

    Season 1, Ep. 6 about a Chinese immigrant. I’ll just leave it at that. Season 1, Episode 10 is about the evil of memes. Season 2, Ep. 4 is about common childhood games designed to scare people.

    I’d say those figure pretty highly for me. But I’d have to rewatch them to see if they still hit the same.

     

    I agree with you about season 1 episode 10. (Couldn’t stop humming that tune for a while, though.) It’s all I can do to save season 1 episode 6 for when my husband gets home.

    In season 1, episode 8, David’s encounter with the beautiful Ann Commerce, and his eventual understanding of who she is, was magnificently done.

    • #19
  20. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married.  At least, not according to the Church.  Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    This is how Nicole Kidman was able to have a Catholic wedding in Australia.  She was Catholic, Tom Cruise wasn’t.  They didn’t have a Church-sanctified marriage.  Therefore, she did not require any special dispensation.  This is why Gwen Stefani, Orange County-raised Catholic, was not able to get married in a Catholic Church.  She would have had to have her Catholic marriage to Gavin Rossdale annulled.  There’s rumors that she did manage to get it annulled prior to her marriage to Blake Shelton, but it’s never been confirmed and her marriage was not presided over by a Catholic priest, in favor of Carson Daly.

    Generally speaking, the Church will grant an annulment for a first marriage if certain things can be proven.  It can take a long, long time to get it annulled, but it can happen.  Once married a second time in the Church, they’re not too keen to provide annulments.  In fact, I’ve never heard of it happening to anyone I know of within my vast social spheres.

     

    • #20
  21. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married.  At least, not according to the Church.  Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    That doesn’t sound quite correct to me.  The Church does recognize non-Catholic marriages as valid marriages, just not as sacramental marriages.

    • #21
  22. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married. At least, not according to the Church. Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    That doesn’t sound quite correct to me. The Church does recognize non-Catholic marriages as valid marriages, just not as sacramental marriages.

    Could it be said, then, that, in a way, the Roman Catholic Church views same sex “marriages” the same way it views all non-Catholic marriages, except for the fact that a same-sex couple could never have a sacramental marriage ?

    • #22
  23. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    Ansonia (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married. At least, not according to the Church. Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    That doesn’t sound quite correct to me. The Church does recognize non-Catholic marriages as valid marriages, just not as sacramental marriages.

    Could it be said, then, that, in a way, the Roman Catholic Church views same sex “marriages” the same way it views all non-Catholic marriages, except for the fact that a same-sex couple could never have a sacramental marriage ?

    Good question, but no, I don’t think so.  Marriage requires a man and a woman.  Some marriages are valid but not sacramental, but same-sex unions are by definition invalid.

    • #23
  24. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):
    Ok. Sounds excessive to me too. You still should want your marriage be sacramentalized. Thats what you get out of it. A sacrament is an indelible mark on your soul and binds two souls in Christ. It’s more than just exchange of vows. It’s your vows bound with Christ.

    Well, I didn’t say I wasn’t going to do it. I just said that the restrictions and bureaucracy are part of my various issues with the Church. I don’t have a problem with the sacraments or Christ.

    Oh. I misread. Great!

    • #24
  25. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married. At least, not according to the Church. Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    That doesn’t sound quite correct to me. The Church does recognize non-Catholic marriages as valid marriages, just not as sacramental marriages.

    Yes, I was about today the same thing. Nurse, the Church recognizes your marriage. By the way, I’m married to  a woman that is Jewish. We do not have a sacramental marriage but we got Church dispensation and recognizes our marriage. 

    • #25
  26. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Manny (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy? I fail to understand. They have to record your marriage. But other than that, what else is there?

    The Catholic church is the world’s oldest bureaucracy. There are rules. 

    • #26
  27. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):
    The Catholic church is the world’s oldest bureaucracy. There are rules. 

    Thousands of years worth of rules.

    • #27
  28. TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness Member
    TheRightNurse, radiant figure of feminine kindness
    @TheRightNurse

    Manny (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married. At least, not according to the Church. Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    That doesn’t sound quite correct to me. The Church does recognize non-Catholic marriages as valid marriages, just not as sacramental marriages.

    Yes, I was about today the same thing. Nurse, the Church recognizes your marriage. By the way, I’m married to a woman that is Jewish. We do not have a sacramental marriage but we got Church dispensation and recognizes our marriage.

    It is possible that I am misspeaking.  The Church doesn’t recognize it as a Catholic marriage.  There were no impediments to the marriage legally, but we’re not married in the eyes of the church. 

    If you have questions, ask your priest, go to: https://www.foryourmarriage.org/convalidation-bringing-your-marriage-into-the-church/ or ask me.  I’ve spent a lot of time on this back from when I thought I would have an interfaith marriage until now. 

    Basically, I don’t have a “real” marriage.  Call it what you will,  but neither one of us can receive Communion.

    • #28
  29. Matt Balzer, Imperialist Claw Member
    Matt Balzer, Imperialist Claw
    @MattBalzer

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    “God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” (1 Peter 5:5)

    A humble and contrite heart is what it takes Nurse. It sounds like you have that. We all fall short. I think you can have your marriage validated in the Church. Speak to the pastor at your parish.

    Oh, we can. It’s just all the bureaucracy.

    What bureaucracy? I fail to understand. They have to record your marriage. But other than that, what else is there?

    The Catholic church is the world’s oldest bureaucracy. There are rules.

    It isn’t ‘Nam after all.

    • #29
  30. Marjorie Reynolds Coolidge
    Marjorie Reynolds
    @MarjorieReynolds

    TheRightNurse, radiant figure … (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):
    Going through all that after you’ve married seems like closing the barn door after the horse has already bolted.

    Ah, but technically we aren’t married. At least, not according to the Church. Technically, we could get legally divorced and things would be fine.

    This is how Nicole Kidman was able to have a Catholic wedding in Australia. She was Catholic, Tom Cruise wasn’t. They didn’t have a Church-sanctified marriage. Therefore, she did not require any special dispensation. This is why Gwen Stefani, Orange County-raised Catholic, was not able to get married in a Catholic Church. She would have had to have her Catholic marriage to Gavin Rossdale annulled. There’s rumors that she did manage to get it annulled prior to her marriage to Blake Shelton, but it’s never been confirmed and her marriage was not presided over by a Catholic priest, in favor of Carson Daly.

    Generally speaking, the Church will grant an annulment for a first marriage if certain things can be proven. It can take a long, long time to get it annulled, but it can happen. Once married a second time in the Church, they’re not too keen to provide annulments. In fact, I’ve never heard of it happening to anyone I know of within my vast social spheres.

     

    Boris Johnson also had a Catholic wedding to Princess Nut Nut and he was married before.

    I know of two annulments but I don’t know what the grounds are and I have to confess I’m always dying to ask.

    Another friend (not so close that I can ask about  her personal business) had her marriage ended by her husband without her consent. He had been trying to get an annulment, they have children so I don’t know  on what grounds unless it was that they were married by schismatic priest. 

    • #30
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