My Upcoming Surgery?

 

I have made an appointment for surgery at the end of summer. I haven’t chosen which operation to have yet, but I know it’s going to be costly.  I don’t mean that I have to choose between two similar operations.  I mean I don’t have a clue in the world what kind of surgery I am going to get.  But I look at it like this: nearly everyone gets some kind of surgery at some point in their life, right?  So I went ahead and made an appointment on the assumption that I will eventually figure out what is the right kind of surgery for me.  I’m sure the hospital will have a guidance counselor or patient advisor who will make a good suggestion as to what kind of surgery would be a good fit for me.  There’s a government loan program for this, and if it turns out that the surgery was totally unnecessary, maybe I can convince some politicians to let me off the hook on repaying the loan.

The above paragraph is satire, of course.  I was listening to the latest episode of The Ricochet Podcast and at the end of it @peterrobinson talks about a conversation he had with a gentleman who went to Princeton.  Not knowing what he should do at Princeton, he let people talk him into getting a major in Hispanic Studies.  This degree was good for getting him a job driving a taxi.  This — in my opinion — is not an anomalous situation.  I have heard of many young people who have gone off to college with no idea of what they want to do with their life.  They just know that everyone goes to college, except for those . . . well, you know . . . dumb people who just aren’t smart enough to get in.  Usually, though, at least these young people are going to a more affordable school than Princeton.

I realize that some people may believe they know what they want to do with their life, then change their mind.  Charles Krauthammer, as a famous example, was a psychiatrist and decided he didn’t really care for it and became a writer and political pundit.  So I’m not criticizing young people for not knowing where they really want to be 20 years down the road.  But doesn’t it seem foolish to sign up for tens of thousands of dollars in debt (or get your parents to shell out that money) when you don’t know what you are going to use your education for?  I guess I’ve just seen too many people with a college degree, who then went on to sell carpeting, insurance, shoes, or cars for a living.  Or get a degree in mass communications and wind up dealing blackjack, before deciding to go through college again and get a nursing degree.  Has it always been like this?  Or has the easy money — either from generous parents or easy-to-get loans — taken pressure off of students to only go to school if they know what their goal is?

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  1. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    they never learned to be on time for things.

    Can’t get whiter than that.

    National Museum of African American History and Culture Promotes Racist ...

    Yes, I was going to include that it seems to be a common problem businesses have with hiring especially young black people.

    • #61
  2. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Juliana (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):
    My mother once collected a debt from a mob-front business.

    Aren’t you from Detroit?

    Are there other kinds of businesses there?

    I live in the Detroit area now. I grew up in Joliet, near Chicago.

    As did I.

    And me.

    • #62
  3. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    One of the smartest people I know is of the opinion that a good, rigorous course of study in mathematics and Latin are all one needs to be prepared for anything life has to offer.

    It’s a nice thought, but speaking as a physicist who would rather rederive the wheel than buy a bus ticket, your friend is overstating his position.

    • #63
  4. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    Percival (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    Of course, Mr Weivoda is one step ahead of  others should he go the route of sexual reassignment surgery.

    Because all he needs to do with his first name is swap out the “y” for an “i” and become Randi.

     

    • #64
  5. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    Of course, Mr Weivoda is one step ahead of others should he go the route of sexual reassignment surgery.

    Because all he needs to do with his first name is swap out the “y” for an “i” and become Randi.

     

    Dandy Weivoda.

    Randy Geivoda.

    This just gets easier as you go!

    • #65
  6. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    As opposed to all those hifalutin’ tattoos which denote class.

    • #66
  7. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    Of course, Mr Weivoda is one step ahead of others should he go the route of sexual reassignment surgery.

    Because all he needs to do with his first name is swap out the “y” for an “i” and become Randi.

     

    Or claim that it’s an adjective now, rather than a name.

    • #67
  8. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    BDB (View Comment):

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    Of course, Mr Weivoda is one step ahead of others should he go the route of sexual reassignment surgery.

    Because all he needs to do with his first name is swap out the “y” for an “i” and become Randi.

     

    Dandy Weivoda.

    Randy Geivoda.

    This just gets easier as you go!

    Randy Randy bo Bandy..

    • #68
  9. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    I am not opposed to a kid embarking on a good liberal arts college education without knowing what it will be used for, and have encouraged that approach in some cases. A college education shouldn’t necessarily be for job training.  I do not like what the federal loan system has done to college education, though. 

    • #69
  10. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    I am not opposed to a kid embarking on a good liberal arts college education without knowing what it will be used for, and have encouraged that approach in some cases. A college education shouldn’t necessarily be for job training. I do not like what the federal loan system has done to college education, though.

    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    • #70
  11. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    • #71
  12. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    High school to the cat in the hat! Do I hear eighth grade? Eighth grade anyone? Going once…

    • #72
  13. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    Fair point.  But even if it’s not, in terms of more-advanced subjects, it doesn’t take 4 years of college for that.  4 years of college is at most 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff – the stuff you have to take for any degree – and the rest being your major study area.  So if you’re not majoring in anything specific, you only need take the 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff.

    • #73
  14. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    Fair point. But even if it’s not, in terms of more-advanced subjects, it doesn’t take 4 years of college for that. 4 years of college is at most 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff – the stuff you have to take for any degree – and the rest being your major study area. So if you’re not majoring in anything specific, you only need take the 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff.

    Back in the day, many students matriculated at universities at age fourteen. They had their Bachelors by 17-18 and MA a year later. And they learned more and did it all in Latin.

    • #74
  15. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    Fair point. But even if it’s not, in terms of more-advanced subjects, it doesn’t take 4 years of college for that. 4 years of college is at most 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff – the stuff you have to take for any degree – and the rest being your major study area. So if you’re not majoring in anything specific, you only need take the 1.5 years of “bonehead” stuff.

    Back in the day, many students matriculated at universities at age fourteen. They had their Bachelors by 17-18 and MA a year later. And they learned more and did it all in Latin.

    Arguably there’s a lot more to learn now, every subject I can think of has developed a lot more in the past 100-200 years.

    Well, maybe not Latin.  But everything else.  Perhaps especially history.

    • #75
  16. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    It should be done by high school.

    High school to the cat in the hat! Do I hear eighth grade? Eighth grade anyone? Going once…

    Grandpap finished eighth grade, but high school was 20+ miles of bad road away and would have meant boarding in town. So he read the books in the farmhouse for a year, then took a state test for a certificate that was the equivalent of a GED. If one did well enough, a teaching certificate was included with the GED. As a result there were students in the first class Grandpap taught who were older than he was. It was all good though because he was bigger than they were.

    I picked up a copy of that test once. Grandpap was a razor at 14.

    • #76
  17. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    kedavis (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    I am not opposed to a kid embarking on a good liberal arts college education without knowing what it will be used for, and have encouraged that approach in some cases. A college education shouldn’t necessarily be for job training. I do not like what the federal loan system has done to college education, though.

    A general education covering basic liberals arts could be done in 2 years at a community college.

    If you’re looking to tick some boxes to put on your resume, yes. But I’m talking about those who really want to learn, say, history to the max.   My opinion for some people was, “Don’t worry about what you’re going to do with a history degree. Probably it won’t be history. But it will do well for you in whatever you do to make a living.” 

    Of course, wokism has made it difficult to get that kind of education. 

    • #77
  18. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Juliana (View Comment):
    College is no longer for education. It is for the “experience.”

    And indoctrination . . .

    • #78
  19. Juliana Member
    Juliana
    @Juliana

    Juliana (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):
    Oh – much better…

    Yep. And my father was a cop. Oh, the stories!

    My uncle the Sheriff.

    Joseph Trizna

    • #79
  20. The Cynthonian Member
    The Cynthonian
    @TheCynthonian

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    I’m going to disagree a bit. A solid liberal arts education should (and I emphasise SHOULD) …

    (1) teach the student HOW to think. Again … how to think not what to think. Thinking is a transferable skill. And learning how can happen as easily in Philosophy or Calculus as Art History or English. So it’s OK not to have a specific career plan. One of the smartest people I know is of the opinion that a good, rigorous course of study in mathematics and Latin are all one needs to be prepared for anything life has to offer.

    (2) teacheoufh  the student how to effectively communicate the results of that thinking to others

    and

    (3) to DO something productive. If the only thing the student knows how to do upon graduation is write a good History paper, getting a job is going to be difficult. So the student should learn something practical… how to calculate with a spreadsheet program, the basics of bookkeeping, how to manipulate a database, write a few lines of Code, how to do experiments in a lab… something that might be of use to an employer on day one.

    Unfortunately, such institutions are hard to find.

    Back in the 1970s, I learned critical thinking in HS, and honed it in college.  Same with your second item.

    My niece and nephews had to go through a tough and expensive private school to get what I got in the 1970s for ( mostly) the cost of my parents’ property taxes.  Their school uses a classical curriculum.   They had to take both Latin and logic in order to graduate, as well as writing and orally presenting a self-chosen research paper.  I wish I had to do all 3 of those in HS.  Would have been good for me, and made college easier.

    • #80
  21. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    BDB (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    As opposed to all those hifalutin’ tattoos which denote class.

    I couldn’t settle on which standard tattoo I wanted so I ended up with a “MOTHER” heart tramp stamp.

    • #81
  22. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):

    BDB (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Whatever surgery you get don’t get your gender reassigned just because it’s trendy. It’s like picking your tattoo off of the example wall in the parlor. It brands you as tacky.

    As opposed to all those hifalutin’ tattoos which denote class.

    I couldn’t settle on which standard tattoo I wanted so I ended up with a “MOTHER” heart tramp stamp.

     

    • #82
  23. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    I got the Chinese character for “barbed wire” tattooed around my bicep.

    • #83
  24. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    Internet's Hank (View Comment):

    I got the Chinese character for “barbed wire” tattooed around my bicep.

    Who hasn’t?

    • #84
  25. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Red Herring (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    I got the Chinese character for “barbed wire” tattooed around my bicep.

    Who hasn’t?

    Me. My bicep tattoo says, “I think this guy has cats, a bad skin condition, or both” written in Braille.

    • #85
  26. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Red Herring (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    I got the Chinese character for “barbed wire” tattooed around my bicep.

    Who hasn’t?

    Me. My bicep tattoo says, “I think this guy has cats, a bad skin condition, or both” written in Braille.

    Reminds me of an old joke.  “He can read women like a book.  And they don’t mind that so much.  What they object to is that he uses the Braille system.”

    • #86
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