August 1 in Warsaw

 

Every August 1 at 5 p.m., Warsaw and other cities across Poland come to a stop. 5 p.m. August 1, 1944, marked the start of the Warsaw uprising against the Nazi German occupiers. The Warsaw uprising was the largest rebellion against Nazi Germany during WWII.

The Polish Home Army was trying to liberate Warsaw before Russian forces arrived. Winston Churchill wanted to help the Home Army but Roosevelt did not want to offend Stalin before the Yalta Conference. Stalin had no intention of coming to the aid of the Home Army. Eventually, aid did come from Britain and the United States, but too late to win the battle.

The Polish people are not as confused about who Putin is as are some people who don’t live in Russia.

Most soldiers of the Home Army (including those who took part in the Warsaw Uprising) were persecuted after the war; captured by the NKVD or UB political police.

They were interrogated and imprisoned on various charges, such as that of fascism. Many of them were sent to Gulags, executed or disappeared.

Between 1944 and 1956, all of the former members of Battalion Zośka were incarcerated in Soviet prisons. In March 1945, a staged trial of 16 leaders of the Polish Underground State held by the Soviet Union took place in Moscow – (the Trial of the Sixteen). The Government Delegate, together with most members of the Council of National Unity and the C-i-C of the Armia Krajowa, were invited by Soviet general Ivan Serov with agreement of Joseph Stalin to a conference on their eventual entry to the Soviet-backed Provisional Government.

They were presented with a warrant of safety, yet they were arrested in Pruszków by the NKVD on 27 and 28 March. Leopold Okulicki, Jan Stanisław Jankowski and Kazimierz Pużak were arrested on the 27th with 12 more the next day. A. Zwierzynski had been arrested earlier. They were brought to Moscow for interrogation in the Lubyanka. After several months of brutal interrogation and torture, they were presented with the forged accusations of collaboration with Nazis and planning a military alliance with Germany. Many resistance fighters, captured by the Germans and sent to POW camps in Germany, were later liberated by British, American and Polish forces and remained in the West. Among those were the leaders of the uprising Tadeusz Bór-Komorowski and Antoni Chruściel.

George Orwell had something to say about British criticism of the Warsaw Uprising on 1 September 1944:

I want to protest against the mean and cowardly attitude adopted by the British press towards the recent rising in Warsaw. … One was left with the general impression that the Poles deserved to have their bottoms smacked for doing what all the Allied wirelesses had been urging them to do for years past,. … First of all, a message to English left-wing journalists and intellectuals generally: ‘Do remember that dishonesty and cowardice always have to be paid for. Don’t imagine that for years on end you can make yourself the boot-licking propagandist of the Soviet régime, or any other régime, and then suddenly return to mental decency. Once a whore, always a whore.’

The young and the old fought for Poland in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

Corporal Witold Modelska died fighting in the resistance, age 12.

21 Moving Images of the Warsaw Uprising During World War II

Photograph was taken just after the emergence of Battalion “MiotÅ‚a” (Sweeper) from the canals beneath “Old Town” during its movement around the “City Center.” These soldiers later joined a squadron known as “Czaty 49.”

21 Moving Images of the Warsaw Uprising During World War II

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  1. Paul Stinchfield Member
    Paul Stinchfield
    @PaulStinchfield

    Doug Watt:

    George Orwell had something to say about British criticism of the Warsaw Uprising on 1 September 1944

    I want to protest against the mean and cowardly attitude adopted by the British press towards the recent rising in Warsaw. … One was left with the general impression that the Poles deserved to have their bottoms smacked for doing what all the Allied wirelesses had been urging them to do for years past,. … First of all, a message to English left-wing journalists and intellectuals generally: ‘Do remember that dishonesty and cowardice always have to be paid for. Don’t imagine that for years on end you can make yourself the boot-licking propagandist of the Soviet régime, or any other régime, and then suddenly return to mental decency. Once a whore, always a whore.’

    That also applies to a lot of American intellectuals and lit’rary types.

    But I would deny that such things are “always paid for”: Many enjoy honors all their lives,

    • #1
  2. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    Doug Watt:

    Every August 1st at 5:00 pm Warsaw and other cities across Poland come to a stop. 5:00 pm August 1st, 1944 marked the start of the Warsaw uprising against the Nazi German occupiers. The Warsaw uprising was the largest rebellion against Nazi Germany during WWII.

    The Polish Home Army was trying to liberate Warsaw before Russia forces arrived. Winston Churchill wanted to help the Home Army, Roosevelt did not want to offend Stalin before the Yalta Conference.

    Really?  Yalta was 6 months away (February 1945).

     

    • #2
  3. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    The Warsaw Uprising Monument. When I took this photo in August 2018 I knew there had been a Warsaw Uprising, but didn’t know what this monument was about. In fact, I had already learned that there had been two Warsaw Uprisings.  But I didn’t know that this one was made on the spot where a manhole entrance to the underground sewer system had been used for soldiers to move around somewhat when the battle was nearly lost and movement was extremely restricted.

    The Polish force insisted on surrendering as soldiers and being treated as such. The Nazis gave them that much.  But the Soviets tried to pretend that it had not been a real army.  It was part of the campaign that is still continued by Putin, to treat Poland as “not a real country” then and Ukraine as “not as real country” now.

    Warsaw Uprising Monument

    • #3
  4. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    Doug Watt:

    Every August 1st at 5:00 pm Warsaw and other cities across Poland come to a stop. 5:00 pm August 1st, 1944 marked the start of the Warsaw uprising against the Nazi German occupiers. The Warsaw uprising was the largest rebellion against Nazi Germany during WWII.

    The Polish Home Army was trying to liberate Warsaw before Russia forces arrived. Winston Churchill wanted to help the Home Army, Roosevelt did not want to offend Stalin before the Yalta Conference.

    Really? Yalta was 6 months away (February 1945).

    Roosevelt despised the British Empire. He believed that he could modify Josef Stalin’s ambitions in eastern Europe. There are stories that as early as 1942 advisors to Roosevelt were “communicating” with Russian intelligence. The Vernona Project is worth researching, as well as reading the “Mitrokhin Archive”.

    Communicating is in quotes as a polite nod to passing on US secrets to the NKVD, GRU, to benefit Stalin.

    • #4
  5. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    The Warsaw Uprising Monument. When I took this photo in August 2018 I knew there had been a Warsaw Uprising, but didn’t know what this monument was about. In fact, I had already learned that there had been two Warsaw Uprisings. But I didn’t know that this one was made on the spot where a manhole entrance to the underground sewer system had been used for soldiers to move around somewhat when the battle was nearly lost and movement was extremely restricted.

    The Polish force insisted on surrendering as soldiers and being treated as such. The Nazis gave them that much. But the Soviets tried to pretend that it had not been a real army. It was part of the campaign that is still continued by Putin, to treat Poland as “not a real country” then and Ukraine as “not as real country” now.

    Warsaw Uprising Monument

    Thank you for the comment. I’m starting to do some research on the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising that deserves its own post.

    • #5
  6. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    Doug Watt:

    Every August 1st at 5:00 pm Warsaw and other cities across Poland come to a stop. 5:00 pm August 1st, 1944 marked the start of the Warsaw uprising against the Nazi German occupiers. The Warsaw uprising was the largest rebellion against Nazi Germany during WWII.

    The Polish Home Army was trying to liberate Warsaw before Russia forces arrived. Winston Churchill wanted to help the Home Army, Roosevelt did not want to offend Stalin before the Yalta Conference.

    Really? Yalta was 6 months away (February 1945).

    Roosevelt despised the British Empire. He believed that he could modify Josef Stalin’s ambitions in eastern Europe. There are stories that as early as 1942 advisors to Roosevelt were “communicating” with Russian intelligence. The Vernona Project is worth researching, as well as reading the “Mitrokhin Archive”.

    Communicating is in quotes as a polite nod to passing on US secrets to the NKVD, GRU, to benefit Stalin.

    If you want to learn more about what a rat FDR and some of his New Dealers were in selling out to Stalin’s every wish, I recommend Sean McMeekin’s book, Stalin’s War: A New History of World War II.  The main theme is how Stalin more than Hitler was the driving force that brought on the war. But FDR doesn’t come off looking good, either. One reviewer says nobody comes off looking good.  The author has alienated almost everyone. 

    As can be expected, a lot of people hate this book. 

    • #6
  7. jzdro Member
    jzdro
    @jzdro

    Thank you, Doug, this is very much appreciated.

    Most soldiers of the Home Army (including those who took part in the Warsaw Uprising) were persecuted after the war; captured by the NKVD or UB political police.

    They were interrogated and imprisoned on various charges, such as that of fascism. Many of them were sent to Gulags, executed or disappeared.

    And the NKVD took their uniforms, and their names, and their identities, and gave them to NKVD agents, who went to Poland posing as Polish officers. They gave credibility to the Soviet effort to establish a puppet government, while searching out surviving patriots to round up.

    • #7
  8. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    I have a copy of Uprising my father left me with his notes and clippings.  Its on my list of things to read.

     

    Despite all the accusations the British tried to support the revolters with supplies flown across Germany and paradropped into the city.  They did their part.  The SOE as I have written elsewhere dont get enough credit.

    • #8
  9. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Wow Doug! Thank you for this very moving and informative post – the videos are incredible.  My mother was Polish  – my dad Ukrainian so I am amazed that I’m here and they made it to the US (grandparents). It solidifies everything good about sovereignty, and national pride, and teaching history – all of it – not just selective parts.  Lest we forget (or are brainwashed into believing all will be utopia in the no borders – One World Government – New World Order), we are doomed to repeat history.

    • #9
  10. Orion Member
    Orion
    @Orion

    In case anyone was wondering what kind of enemy the Poles had to deal with…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHRH-pcFVio

    BTW, the Soviets weren’t much better.

    • #10
  11. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    Sabaton has a great song about this, called Uprising:

    The Polish fighters were heroically courageous.  I honor them for that.

    Do y’all think that the uprising was a good idea?  It did cause a lot of deaths, and it failed.  This does not detract from the courage of those who fought.  It is a question of evaluating those who led.

    • #11
  12. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    Sabaton has a great song about this, called Uprising:

    The Polish fighters were heroically courageous. I honor them for that.

    Do y’all think that the uprising was a good idea? It did cause a lot of deaths, and it failed. This does not detract from the courage of those who fought. It is a question of evaluating those who led.

    It made the point that Poland was a real nation, making that point both to the Poles themselves and to the world, including the Soviets. The Soviets were later resigned to giving the Poles a little bit of wiggle room, giving up on the idea of collectivizing their agriculture, for example. The uprising helped establish the mentality that made that possible, and arguably leading even to the Polish leading role in defending Ukraine from Putin’s aggression. 

    • #12
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