Push It Down?

 

So the Texas Department of Public Safety speaks. The Texas Governor speaks. Know-nothings running for office speak. The President speaks.

I had a dream last night. I dreamed that the Governor of Florida spoke. In my dream, DeSantis said something simple and profound: This isn’t for the Governor of Florida to cure; Uvalde needs to fix their problem.

Sorry, Xiden can only do so much to solve the issue.  Neither can Pelosi, Schumer, or O’Rourke.  In the end, it’s a local problem. Sure, by their policies others may exacerbate the problem, and they might be able to address that: But in the final analysis, it’s a local problem.

Support your local authorities, you might actually have some influence there!

Published in Domestic Policy
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  1. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Yes.  I can’t tell you how much time we have spent as a school board working on this issue.  We passed a large bond (almost completed) for which the primary purpose was to make the schools more physically secure.  We are also arming staff, although training them and setting policy will be an iterative process.  Communities differ greatly.  The much larger adjacent school district to our south will likely never arm teachers.  Most of the smaller area rural districts are already doing it or working on plans to do it. I’ll wager not a single district in Bexar (San Antonio) county will do it.  We probably also need to pay a stipend to those who enroll in the program.  I’m sure at our meeting in 9 days we will be spending a lot of time on it. 

    • #1
  2. Lawst N. Thawt Coolidge
    Lawst N. Thawt
    @LawstNThawt

    I have a thought developing in my head that our biggest mistake maybe is not focusing on electing the best people to state and local positions.

    A governor’s job is a great deal more important to the state than the president’s job is to that state.

    It is when the federal legislature does things that attempt to level the playing field across the nation that stifles some states while not really helping others. 

    But it sounds good and it plays well on the campaign trail.  

     

    • #2
  3. Fritz Coolidge
    Fritz
    @Fritz

    Lawst N. Thawt (View Comment):

    I have a thought developing in my head that our biggest mistake maybe is not focusing on electing the best people to state and local positions.

    A governor’s job is a great deal more important to the state than the president’s job is to that state.

    It is when the federal legislature does things that attempt to level the playing field across the nation that stifles some states while not really helping others.

    But it sounds good and it plays well on the campaign trail.

    The idea of federal leveling the playing field in general sounds more like a plan to erase our 50 sovereign states, and remake them into mere administrative districts of the DC leviathan. The DOJ routinely meddles in local policing, imposes federal court injunctions on them, all in service of what to me looks like a long range communist-style goal of abolishing local police in favor of a federal police. Voila: total control.

    • #3
  4. Lawst N. Thawt Coolidge
    Lawst N. Thawt
    @LawstNThawt

    I think there are a great many things that are done that sound like good ideas at the time and they have undesirable consequences.  

    I’ve been aiming to look back and see if I can find any accurate descriptions of why our grandparents (or great GPs) thought it was a good idea to toss in the 17th Amendment.  I just did a quick look and apparently, some states would occasionally deadlock on choosing senators and would have vacancies that lasted for months and years.  It also appears there was perceived a lot of corruption and that senate seats were controlled by special interests groups, bribery, and corruption. 

    I’m not sure why, but that last bit sounds strikingly familiar.

    • #4
  5. Chuck Thatcher
    Chuck
    @Chuckles

    Lawst N. Thawt (View Comment):

    I have a thought developing in my head that our biggest mistake maybe is not focusing on electing the best people to state and local positions.

    A governor’s job is a great deal more important to the state than the president’s job is to that state.

    It is when the federal legislature does things that attempt to level the playing field across the nation that stifles some states while not really helping others.

    But it sounds good and it plays well on the campaign trail.

    You know what? The larger the entity, the more difficult it is to get the right people on the job, and the more important baby-kissing becomes.  That’s a significant portion of what’s behind comment #1.

    When I vote for my county commissioner, what I think matters to the candidates.  State Senator? Representative? Well, I’ve met them. They know me.  But my vote is just a bit less important. What about the Governor? Not so much. President?  Well, I vote but…

    • #5
  6. Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler Member
    Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler
    @Muleskinner

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Yes. I can’t tell you how much time we have spent as a school board working on this issue. We passed a large bond (almost completed) for which the primary purpose was to make the schools more physically secure. We are also arming staff, although training them and setting policy will be an iterative process. Communities differ greatly. The much larger adjacent school district to our south will likely never arm teachers. Most of the smaller area rural districts are already doing it or working on plans to do it. I’ll wager not a single district in Bexar (San Antonio) county will do it. We probably also need to pay a stipend to those who enroll in the program. I’m sure at our meeting in 9 days we will be spending a lot of time on it.

    I’m told that one of the biggest school violence issues in public schools is students assaulting teachers. My guess is also that the severity of the problem varies greatly from district to district, but almost surely is a problem an order of magnitude greater than school shootings. What impact would this have on a decision to allow teachers to be armed? Teachers could not allow themselves to be disarmed by students and would have to use deadly force to protect themselves and their students. Armed staff would face the same decision, but perhaps, are assaulted less often. I support any local decision, and individual decision, made by teachers and school boards who know their local communities, but: (1) Do other problems (i.e. violent, but unarmed students) prevent some workable solutions, and (2) Would students knowing that some (but not which) teachers are trained and armed reduce the rate of assault on teachers?

    • #6
  7. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler (View Comment):

    I’m told that one of the biggest school violence issues in public schools is students assaulting teachers. My guess is also that the severity of the problem varies greatly from district to district, but almost surely is a problem an order of magnitude greater than school shootings. What impact would this have on a decision to allow teachers to be armed? Teachers could not allow themselves to be disarmed by students and would have to use deadly force to protect themselves and their students. Armed staff would face the same decision, but perhaps, are assaulted less often. I support any local decision, and individual decision, made by teachers and school boards who know their local communities, but: (1) Do other problems (i.e. violent, but unarmed students) prevent some workable solutions, and (2) Would students knowing that some (but not which) teachers are trained and armed reduce the rate of assault on teachers?

    We have never had a student physically attack a teacher to my knowledge, and I’ve been here 26 years.  Having armed staff is uncharted territory for us.  We attended many hours of workshops and heard from schools that have a program in place.  But it will still be new for us.  Who knows what we will find out?

    • #7
  8. Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler Member
    Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler
    @Muleskinner

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler (View Comment):

    I’m told that one of the biggest school violence issues in public schools is students assaulting teachers. My guess is also that the severity of the problem varies greatly from district to district, but almost surely is a problem an order of magnitude greater than school shootings. What impact would this have on a decision to allow teachers to be armed? Teachers could not allow themselves to be disarmed by students and would have to use deadly force to protect themselves and their students. Armed staff would face the same decision, but perhaps, are assaulted less often. I support any local decision, and individual decision, made by teachers and school boards who know their local communities, but: (1) Do other problems (i.e. violent, but unarmed students) prevent some workable solutions, and (2) Would students knowing that some (but not which) teachers are trained and armed reduce the rate of assault on teachers?

    We have never had a student physically attack a teacher to my knowledge, and I’ve been here 26 years. Having armed staff is uncharted territory for us. We attended many hours of workshops and heard from schools that have a program in place. But it will still be new for us. Who knows what we will find out?

    My only knowledge of the teacher assault issue comes from a legislative debate over a bill that would give teachers a legal defense against any punishment resulting from actions taken to physically restrain a student when that student is assaulting the teacher or another student. The bill’s sponsor had data showing that teachers are being assaulted and being disciplined for restraining students, and some data on Workers Comp claims arising from injuries sustained in assaults.

    And thanks for your elected service. That can’t be easy. 

    • #8
  9. Ole Summers Member
    Ole Summers
    @OleSummers

    We are designed to be, intended to be a “grass roots” republic. Those with the most at stake, who feel the results most directly have to realize that in government – as in life – if you dont control the things affecting you, you are at someone else’s mercy. The higher the level that regulations come from, normally the worst they are for the ones at the end of the chain. These local offices too often seem thankless battles, and often they are. But it is important they are tirelessly fought if we are to gain back more control of our own paths. 

    • #9
  10. Quietpi Member
    Quietpi
    @Quietpi

    Muleskinner, Weasel Wrangler (View Comment):
    My only knowledge of the teacher assault issue comes from a legislative debate over a bill that would give teachers a legal defense against any punishment resulting from actions taken to physically restrain a student when that student is assaulting the teacher or another student. The bill’s sponsor had data showing that teachers are being assaulted and being disciplined for restraining students, and some data on Workers Comp claims arising from injuries sustained in assaults.

    A good friend is a music teacher in a nearby high school.  Last school year a “student” became disruptive, making teaching impossible.  My friend tried everything he knew to control the situation, but the “student” would not relent.  As a last resort, he sent the “student” to the principal’s office.  

    Guess who got the reprimand?

    • #10
  11. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    I avoided the DeSantis for President thread because I think DeSantis is better as Governor and Trump is better as president for this exact reason. Trump has a good instinct on the actual purpose of a federal government with some mistakes… and he inspires even the lefties to promote their own states. More Trump in federal office more DeSantis in state offices.

    • #11
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