The FDA’s War on Children

 

The Washington Free Beacon reports today that the FDA approved COVID boosters for children as young as five without convening the Vaccine Advisory Panel. The FDA circumvented the usual process for vaccine approval. Anyone with minimal sentience can see that these FDA vaccine approvals are purely political, and not based on any sort of “Science.”

Specifically, there is virtually no benefit to vaccinating, let alone boosting, small children. The reason for that has been recognized almost from the onset of COVID: For the virus to enter cells, activated androgen receptors are required, that is, androgen receptors in the cell cytoplasm that are occupied by testosterone. Such receptors exist in very low if any quantities at all in the cells of small prepubertal children. The activated androgen receptors move from the cell cytoplasm into the nucleus where they induce the expression of a protein, a serine peptidase that splits proteins at serine amino acid residues. That peptidase is necessary for allowing the virus to open its envelope to merge with the cell membrane and release viral materials into the cell.

The clinical data of very low incidence of COVID in children, and a very mild course in all but the most vulnerable children, tracks with the basic science understanding of the virus.

And with the variants now present, it is questionable that there would be any significant protection at all from another shot. The data have not been reviewed by the advisory panel, which is mandatory in normal times.

One assumes that Anthony Fauci will be personally receiving royalties from Pfizer and Moderna for this additional indication for administering the vaccine. We, of course, don’t know that but redacted information released regarding royalty payments to NIH employees indicates that may very well be the case.

Milton Friedman once said the following: “The FDA has done enormous harm to the American public by greatly increasing the costs of pharmaceutical research and thereby reducing the supply of new and effective drugs, and delaying the approval of such drugs….”

The FDA has now done an about-face in the case of COVID vaccines and boosters, and willy-nilly approved vaccines without knowing risks, in circumstances in which benefit is likely to be minimal, with the exception of the very few children who may be under treatment for cancer, or have severe immune deficiency disorders. And in these cases, there simply is insufficient data to evaluate risk and benefit.

If there were any science applied to the vetting of vaccines, the vaccines would all still be under Emergency Use Authorization, given their abysmal track record in preventing COVID, and the absence of data on side effects and risks, which have been at best swept under the carpet. The vaccines should not have received full approval. That was done simply to allow vaccine mandates a la Jacobson v. Massachusetts, a Supreme Court decision that has been massively abused during COVID. COVID vaccines are nothing like Small Pox vaccines. They do not prevent the disease. There is some evidence that they may enhance the transmission of the disease.

On the other hand, the FDA just approved Tirzepitide, the first of a new class of diabetes medicine, called “twincretins.” Based on studies done on the drug, it is more effective than a similar class of medications, the GLP-1 analogs (Ozempic, Trulicity, Bydureon, Victoza) in controlling type 2 diabetes and inducing weight loss. This is a new class of drugs because it has the effects of two different hormones, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) and GIP (Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide), both of which are incretins. Incretins are hormones (produced by the intestine) that enhance insulin secretion after a meal and improve insulin action. These are the two main incretins. Their effects are somewhat paradoxical and it took a while to understand that together they have a more potent clinical effect on type 2 diabetes than either hormone alone. That was not predicted by the early studies on the effects of these hormones, which are, to say the least, quite complex.

Research and development of these hormones and drugs have been underway for decades. The manufacturer of the twincretin (Eli Lilly) has been working on the drug for at least a decade (see Milton Friedman quote above). The cost of the medication is likely to be very high. Due to prior “guidelines” by such entities as the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Endocrine Society, which have advised stepwise addition of newer medications to older medications; and due to the fact that Medicare and Insurance companies have latched on to such guidelines to block use of the newer agents, the use of this new class of medication is likely to be stymied for years to come. The process of “Prior Approval” will burden physician offices and staff, and hamper patient use. Part D of Medicare is structured to utterly eviscerate the use of such new agents by Medicare beneficiaries. Insurers have many tricks to avoid having to pay for such medications for patients.

It is quite likely that it would be a boon to everyone, patients, insurers, the government, the manufacturer, if, instead of blocking use of such a drug, or pricing it out of the reach of patients, all of the above would promote the use of the drug at a reasonable cost, or at least not obstruct the use of the drug.

The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds. Despite the high doses of insulin she was taking,  her blood sugars averaged around 300 (diabetes out of control) and her HGBA1C was 12% (normal less than 6%, again, diabetes completely out of control). She was intolerant of Byetta, but tolerated the bydureon.  Within three months on bydureon, she had lost 30 lbs., come off insulin completely, and her HGBA1c was 6%. She happened to be a Medicaid beneficiary, and this was in Texas. Texas barred the use of Bydureon for Medicaid beneficiaries. We had to provide her with samples for the three months that she was on Bydureon. At that point, however, we were out of samples and simply couldn’t keep her supplied. She had no option but to return to her previous regimen and thus returned to her previous state of weight gain, high-dose insulin, and Diabetes out of control.

A similar scenario is likely with this new agent. Thanks to the regulatory regime and health industry structure under which we live.

ON another note, the FDA appears to be returning with a vengeance to its foremost original mission, which was food safety (the FDA was created in 1906, the Progressive Era, by the Pure Food and Drug Act, inspired by Upton Sinclair’s book, The Jungle, a muck-raking expose’ of the meatpacking industry). It appears that the infant formula shortage is to a great extent the result of the FDA closing an Abbott plant that produced infant formula. Adding that to current supply chain problems and the protective barriers to imported infant formula that were established to benefit the dairy industry in the US, appears to be the cause of the shortages. So the FDA has gone from blocking life-saving or enhancing medications, to forcing poorly vetted vaccines on children, to taking food out of the mouths of babes.

I agree with Milton Friedman: The FDA needs to be abolished. It is wreaking havoc on the lives and health of Americans. When a product is plentifully available in Mexico and almost unobtainable in the US due to one of our most powerful regulatory agencies, one has to ask: Can we afford this sort of governance?

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  1. Sandy Member
    Sandy
    @Sandy

    I see that the American Academy of Pediatrics has suddenly and shamelessly changed its recommendations on when formula may be safely discontinued from one year to six months.  That should ease the shortage and increase business for pediatric allergists.  

     

    • #1
  2. Unsk Member
    Unsk
    @Unsk

    The FDA needs to be abolished.  It is wreaking havoc on the lives and health of Americans. When a product is plentifully available in Mexico, and almost unobtainable in the US, due to one of our most powerful regulatory agencies,  one has to ask: Can we afford this sort of governance?

    Should have been abolished long time ago.  So many deaths can be traced to it’s doorstep. 

    The NIH has been found to have taken 350 million smackers in bribes, er I mean legal royalties over the last ten years.

    How much  do you think the  FDA has taken?  If I were a betting man , I would bet that it’s  a lot more than $350 million.    Time for a massive and intensive corruption probe and then some perhaps some serious prosecutions for corruption and perhaps even manslaughter to boot.

    Also there are many, many medical cures that won’t garner the billions for Big Pharma  but are a threat to those drugs that will and therefore they have been blocked. Whole avenues of medical inquiry have been sidetracked to protect Big Pharma.   

    • #2
  3. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    I’m not, for the most part, a believer in conspiracy theories, but I’m also not a blind believer in coincidences; especially when the government and large profits for government-dependent organizations are involved.

    • #3
  4. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: prepubertal

    Have I fallen behind, is that the new term now, not prepubescent?

    • #4
  5. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: prepubertal

    Have I fallen behind, is that the new term now, not prepubescent?

    Just another term for prepubescent. You are hardly behind, rather more classical and refined.

    • #5
  6. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    Unsk (View Comment):

    The FDA needs to be abolished. It is wreaking havoc on the lives and health of Americans. When a product is plentifully available in Mexico, and almost unobtainable in the US, due to one of our most powerful regulatory agencies, one has to ask: Can we afford this sort of governance?

    Should have been abolished long time ago. So many deaths can be traced to it’s doorstep.

    The NIH has been found to have taken 350 million smackers in bribes, er I mean legal royalties over the last ten years.

    How much do you think the FDA has taken? If I were a betting man , I would bet that it’s a lot more than $350 million. Time for a massive and intensive corruption probe and then some perhaps some serious prosecutions for corruption and perhaps even manslaughter to boot.

    Also there are many, many medical cures that won’t garner the billions for Big Pharma but are a threat to those drugs that will and therefore they have been blocked. Whole avenues of medical inquiry have been sidetracked to protect Big Pharma.

    Exactly correct, in my view.

    • #6
  7. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Regarding the formula shortage, it’s my understanding that it’s been exacerbated by the fact the government contracted almost exclusively with Abbott to provide formula for the WIC program – up to 90%. 

    Only the government is stupid enough to have an almost exclusive supplier for such an important product. And through the WIC program serves a vulnerable population. I’d love to see the back room deal that gave Abbott that business. 

    I have almost zero experience with pharmaceuticals (thank the good Lord). But a cousin’s husband worked at Abbott for a while, and he made no bones about being gleeful about the poor state of health of many Americans. 

    • #7
  8. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Sandy (View Comment):

    I see that the American Academy of Pediatrics has suddenly and shamelessly changed its recommendations on when formula may be safely discontinued from one year to six months. That should ease the shortage and increase business for pediatric allergists.

     

    This is disgusting. I have no idea how young families and new mothers are managing to navigate the BS. 

    I have a daughter and a daughter in law with little ones; thankfully they both come from large families and follow their instincts more than the “experts”.  It’s been my experience that families with multiple children have managed to survive better than most the last 2+ years of bad advice and outright lying. IMHO it’s because they had so much experience with bad advice and nonsense from so many when they were raising their children.  

    • #8
  9. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Sandy (View Comment):

    I see that the American Academy of Pediatrics has suddenly and shamelessly changed its recommendations on when formula may be safely discontinued from one year to six months. That should ease the shortage and increase business for pediatric allergists.

    I do agree about the American Academy of Pediatrics being generally shameful most of the time, but I think in this case they are going back to their standard advice of thirty-five years ago. With the guidance of my pediatrician–a fantastic doctor in every way–my babies were weaned to cow’s milk at four to six months, and to this day there are almost no allergies among my kids. We supplemented the milk with Gerber’s rice cereal to increase the iron in the babies’ diets.

    I’ve thought for years now that something was screwy with the long length of time moms were nursing their babies. Whatever works is the best way to go, and I don’t care what people do, but it has bothered me that the moms were being advised to nurse for such long time periods.

    I wouldn’t want the nation’s babies to be dependent on these formula or baby food companies. It bothered me even years ago when my kids were babies. I wasn’t a very trusting mother. I made most of my own baby and toddler food for that reason. (At the risk of being gross: Breast milk is kind of a miracle in and of itself. I read somewhere years ago that a mostly starving mother living on nearly plain water alone can still “make” breast milk. That’s an act of God, not humans. The idea that we can manufacture something like it is pretty crazy to begin with.)

    It’s a moderation-in-all-things principle. I used Gerber’s rice cereal as a small part of my babies’ diet. If anything went wrong with the cereal, it was easily replaced and the baby hadn’t had so much of it that I had to worry. I had a neighbor years ago who framed my life this way: “I eat things like tuna fish only once a week. That way, when I later read that there’s something wrong with it, I’ll be able to say to myself, ‘Well, I never had too much of it anyway.’ ”

    I have always admired that thinking. :-)

    • #9
  10. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    I don’t mean to criticize the formula companies. Billions of babies have thrived on their products. They have been, up to now, very good companies making excellent products. 

    Even Abbott. We’re talking about two babies who got sick and tragically died, but out of how many billions of babies. It would be hard to find a better company anywhere. 

    • #10
  11. 9thDistrictNeighbor Member
    9thDistrictNeighbor
    @9thDistrictNeighbor

    Maybe it’s not just a meme?

    • #11
  12. Cassandro Coolidge
    Cassandro
    @Flicker

    MarciN (View Comment):

    I don’t mean to criticize the formula companies. Billions of babies have thrived on their products. They have been, up to now, very good companies making excellent products.

    Even Abbott. We’re talking about two babies who got sick and tragically died, but out of how many billions of babies. It would be hard to find a better company anywhere.

    And Abbott says that the strain that killed the children was different from what was found in their production plant.

    • #12
  13. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    MarciN (View Comment):

    I don’t mean to criticize the formula companies. Billions of babies have thrived on their products. They have been, up to now, very good companies making excellent products.

    Even Abbott. We’re talking about two babies who got sick and tragically died, but out of how many billions of babies. It would be hard to find a better company anywhere.

    I have not knowingly purchased a Nestle product in at least 40 years, since learning of their immoral marketing of formula in 3rd world countries.

    Regarding pharmaceutical companies, I was for years reflexively defensive, a la a John Stossel. Various drugs and medications kept a few of my loved ones alive long past their sell date; for that reason I was appreciative.

    I credit my not having a TV since 1986 for that ridiculous naivete. Except for the few months when my dad was dying, I was completely oblivious to their marketing efforts (and the only thing I remember from those few months were the ubiquity of Cialis commercials …)

    It was when my own doc reached for the scrip pad for statins for me to really wake up. I told him in no uncertain terms I was open to a discussion about improving my diet, but there was no friggen way I was going to be on a drug for the next however many years to add some time to the back end. Having recently buried my mother, I had witnessed the last years and I wanted no part of them. Add some years to my sixties and I’m all ears. (turns out my cholesterol was a little high, but within the acceptable range)

    Around the same time, my sisters and sisters in law were being recommended ADHD drugs for my nieces and nephews (they all politely declined. They’d fortunately been around enough kids to know their kids were fine.)

    My grandchildren will get vaccinated for Covid over my, and their mothers’, cold, dead bodies.

    Whenever someone inquires about my own unvaccinated state, and my strong feelings about my grandchildren getting vaxxed, I simply reply “I’m in the habit of not taking drugs I don’t need. It has served me well.”

    • #13
  14. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte
    @Charlotte

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: twincretins

    I’m sorry but all I can think of is Biden and Pelosi.

    • #14
  15. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: twincretins

    I’m sorry but all I can think of is Biden and Pelosi.

    Well said!

    • #15
  16. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    I’m a long-time disciple of Milton Friedman, and I’m blessed with sufficient good health and athletic interests that make it highly unlikely that I’ll ever be sufficiently obese to develop type 2 diabetes.

    I’ll come across as cruel, but it strikes me that

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices – aided to an extent by genetics, but controlled by individual behavior; and

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding to minimize the effects of these unhealthy lifestyle choices, and together advocating that public and private healthcare insurance should subsidize the gluttonous mess.

    Is it cruel of me to point out that in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight. I should no more have to subsidize Jabba the Hut’s healthcare than I should have to pay the student loans of a UConn alumna with a degree in puppet arts. We cannot afford to subsidize so heavily such suicidal lifestyles.

     

    • #16
  17. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    I’m a long-time disciple of Milton Friedman, and I’m blessed with sufficient good health and athletic interests that make it highly unlikely that I’ll ever be sufficiently obese to develop type 2 diabetes.

    I’ll come across as cruel, but it strikes me that

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices – aided to an extent by genetics, but controlled by individual behavior; and

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding to minimize the effects of these unhealthy lifestyle choices, and together advocating that public and private healthcare insurance should subsidize the gluttonous mess.

    Is it cruel of me to point out that in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight. I should no more have to subsidize Jabba the Hut’s healthcare than I should have to pay the student loans of a UConn alumna with a degree in puppet arts. We cannot afford to subsidize so heavily such suicidal lifestyles.

     

    Well, I’m a masochist (I have an MD degree to prove it) so I have spent 40 years trying to get people with type 2 diabetes to lose weight and exercise, with very little success. Hence the burgeoning field of bariatric surgery. So, by default, I can only embrace GLP-1 analogs, and now the new twincretin (not to be confused with Biden and Pelosi).[ Note that in the case of Biden and Pelosi that can be spelled C-r-e-t-a-n-but that insults Cretans].  In medicine, the term “cretinism” and “cretin” are also  very specific archaic terms for severe cognitive dysfunction due to undiagnosed and thus untreated congenital hypothyroidism (for many years now all infants are screened at birth for hypothyroidism with a TSH level).

    It is true that in type 2 diabetes there is a defect in the production and function of normally occurring GLP-1 and GIP. The drug versions of these naturally occurring hormones are  modified to extend the duration of action of the hormones, and they are a god-send for treating type 2 diabetes; and they provide arguably the most effective methods of assisting weight loss that we have. They help immensely in the sisyphean task of controlling diabetes and assisting weight loss. 

    • #17
  18. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    I’m a long-time disciple of Milton Friedman, and I’m blessed with sufficient good health and athletic interests that make it highly unlikely that I’ll ever be sufficiently obese to develop type 2 diabetes.

    I’ll come across as cruel, but it strikes me that

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices – aided to an extent by genetics, but controlled by individual behavior; and

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding to minimize the effects of these unhealthy lifestyle choices, and together advocating that public and private healthcare insurance should subsidize the gluttonous mess.

    Is it cruel of me to point out that in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight. I should no more have to subsidize Jabba the Hut’s healthcare than I should have to pay the student loans of a UConn alumna with a degree in puppet arts. We cannot afford to subsidize so heavily such suicidal lifestyles.

     

    An excuse to tell the story of a very good friend. She’s been obese for 20+ years. Couldn’t muster the energy to lose weight. She got diagnosed with Type 2 last year. She asked to get referred to a nutritionist. The nutritionist was as heavy as my friend, and greeted her with “welcome to the club”. I don’t know if my friend said it, but she at least thought: I don’t want to be a member of any club you’re in. 

    She turned on her heel and since then has lost more than 100 lbs through intermittent fasting. Hasta la vista to diabetes and a host of other problems. I’m so proud of her I can’t talk about it without welling up.  

    • #18
  19. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    I’m a long-time disciple of Milton Friedman, and I’m blessed with sufficient good health and athletic interests that make it highly unlikely that I’ll ever be sufficiently obese to develop type 2 diabetes.

    I’ll come across as cruel, but it strikes me that

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices – aided to an extent by genetics, but controlled by individual behavior; and

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding to minimize the effects of these unhealthy lifestyle choices, and together advocating that public and private healthcare insurance should subsidize the gluttonous mess.

    Is it cruel of me to point out that in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight. I should no more have to subsidize Jabba the Hut’s healthcare than I should have to pay the student loans of a UConn alumna with a degree in puppet arts. We cannot afford to subsidize so heavily such suicidal lifestyles.

     

    An excuse to tell the story of a very good friend. She’s been obese for 20+ years. Couldn’t muster the energy to lose weight. She got diagnosed with Type 2 last year. She asked to get referred to a nutritionist. The nutritionist was as heavy as my friend, and greeted her with “welcome to the club”. I don’t know if my friend said it, but she at least thought: I don’t want to be a member of any club you’re in.

    She turned on her heel and since then has lost more than 100 lbs through intermittent fasting. Hasta la vista to diabetes and a host of other problems. I’m so proud of her I can’t talk about it without welling up.

    I think you can safely pass along the well-wishes of many others here at Ricochet.

    • #19
  20. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Thanks @kedavis. I wish so much that people knew most people just want – and rejoice in – what’s best for them.  

    • #20
  21. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    Annefy (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

     * * *

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices . . .

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding . . .

    . . . in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight.

    An excuse to tell the story of a very good friend. . . .

     

    She turned on her heel and since then has lost more than 100 lbs through intermittent fasting. Hasta la vista to diabetes and a host of other problems.

    I rest my case.

    I’m thrilled for your friend.

    Yet the medical establishment won’t even address what we can see right before our own eyes. And it don’t even cost nothing!

    • #21
  22. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    [Removed duplicate post]

    • #22
  23. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    * * *

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices . . .

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding . . .

    . . . in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight.

    An excuse to tell the story of a very good friend. . . .

     

    She turned on her heel and since then has lost more than 100 lbs through intermittent fasting. Hasta la vista to diabetes and a host of other problems.

    I rest my case.

    I’m thrilled for your friend.

    Yet the medical establishment won’t even address what we can see right before our own eyes. And it don’t even cost nothing!

    I don’t have any experience with the issue and don’t know who’s to blame – but it’s obvious there is a huge problem. 

    Joe Rogan got Eric Weinstein and Gad Saad to lose weight through old-fashioned fat shaming. Not sure that would work for everyone, but I’m pretty sure that celebrating the overweight on magazine covers and claiming one can be fat and healthy isn’t helping. 

    It’s also obvious to me that we’ve been getting really bad nutrition recommendations for at least a generation. Not just bad, but 100% wrong. The FDA is certainly to blame for that. 

    • #23
  24. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    Annefy (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian: The first patient I ever treated with Bydureon when it first came out (a long-acting, much more effective and better-tolerated formulation of Byetta, the original GLP-1 analog), was a middle-aged woman with type 2 diabetes who was taking about 300 Units of insulin a day. She weighed 300 pounds.

    I’m a long-time disciple of Milton Friedman, and I’m blessed with sufficient good health and athletic interests that make it highly unlikely that I’ll ever be sufficiently obese to develop type 2 diabetes.

    I’ll come across as cruel, but it strikes me that

    (1) most type 2 diabetes sufferers are victims of their lifestyle choices – aided to an extent by genetics, but controlled by individual behavior; and

    (2) the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry are constantly colluding to minimize the effects of these unhealthy lifestyle choices, and together advocating that public and private healthcare insurance should subsidize the gluttonous mess.

    Is it cruel of me to point out that in the vast majority of type 2 diabetes cases, if the patient would simply get his or her BMI below say, 28, virtually all of his or her health problems would disappear? Circulation, respiratory issues, joint pain, heart conditions, are all caused by, or at least exacerbated by morbid obesity(, right Doc?).

    Absolutely, abolish the FDA. And fire every doctor who won’t tell the morbidly obese patients to lose weight. I should no more have to subsidize Jabba the Hut’s healthcare than I should have to pay the student loans of a UConn alumna with a degree in puppet arts. We cannot afford to subsidize so heavily such suicidal lifestyles.

     

    An excuse to tell the story of a very good friend. She’s been obese for 20+ years. Couldn’t muster the energy to lose weight. She got diagnosed with Type 2 last year. She asked to get referred to a nutritionist. The nutritionist was as heavy as my friend, and greeted her with “welcome to the club”. I don’t know if my friend said it, but she at least thought: I don’t want to be a member of any club you’re in.

    She turned on her heel and since then has lost more than 100 lbs through intermittent fasting. Hasta la vista to diabetes and a host of other problems. I’m so proud of her I can’t talk about it without welling up.

    Massive kudos to your friend. She is the patient we live and love to see. I can count on two hands the number of patients I’ve seen that have been able to achieve what she has achieved. 
    Patient, heal thy self! I, for one, am more than pleased to see and hear of such patients. Diabetes is a terrible disease, and the meds, as well as bariatric surgery all have side effects with their benefits. Your friend opted for the only cure.

    • #24
  25. Ammo.com Member
    Ammo.com
    @ammodotcom

    Annefy (View Comment):

    It’s been my experience that families with multiple children have managed to survive better than most the last 2+ years of bad advice and outright lying. IMHO it’s because they had so much experience with bad advice and nonsense from so many when they were raising their children.

    That sounds common sense enough to believe without spending $1.8 million on studies.

    • #25
  26. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Ammo.com (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    It’s been my experience that families with multiple children have managed to survive better than most the last 2+ years of bad advice and outright lying. IMHO it’s because they had so much experience with bad advice and nonsense from so many when they were raising their children.

    That sounds common sense enough to believe without spending $1.8 million on studies.

    Good to see you, Ammo.com, it’s been a while!

    • #26
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