Breitbart: The Bush Brand Is Toxic Now

 

George P. Bush is having trouble gaining traction in his race for Texas Attorney General (his stepping stone to the governorship and then the White House). He has tried really hard to shake off the family legacy of “compassionate (big government) conservatism” and “illegal immigration is an act of love,” He has tried desperately to brand himself as a MAGA Republican. But the voters aren’t buying it.

His ubiquitous name recognition is emerging as a liability in the Republican party. George P. Bush, who currently serves as the state’s land commissioner, is trailing Paxton in polls. Some of the top reasons Republican voters are reluctant about him are his ties to his family’s center-right political leanings and his own past policy positions.

Bush said those attacks are led by Paxton and don’t reflect the support he has seen on the campaign trail. The sitting attorney general’s ads against Bush focus on labeling him a RINO — Republican in name only — and linking him to his famous family.

I know it’s a bummer for GPW that he has to pay for the sins of his family. His uncle and his granddad stabbed conservatives in the back too often to be easily forgiven. Maybe his conversion to “Trumpism” is genuine, but the Bush name is synonymous with campaigning as a conservative and then governing as a big government, globalist moderates who cut bad deals with Democrats.

America really shouldn’t have political dynasties anyway.

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  1. Doctor Robert Member
    Doctor Robert
    @DoctorRobert

    The last line sez it all.  Let him make a fortune in business rather than being another squish pol who leads America in the wrong direction.

    • #1
  2. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    It has become obvious that family ties trump politics. Often they will be in alignment, but then there are times when loyalty to family is called upon. We saw this with the Bushes and the Cheney’s. 

    Besides the Bush family is a joke. That they allowed Jeb to run told us everything. That Jeb actually said at one point that he just “happened to have the same last name” shows how depraved they are. Is there an  an alternate universe where football star Reggie Bush announces his candidacy for the GOP nomination and takes in 100 million dollars because he happens to have the same last name? I don’t think so. 

     

    • #2
  3. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    The people who hated 41 and 43 still do and always will. But I don’t think every Republican feels that way. I certainly don’t.

    • #3
  4. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The people who hated 41 and 43 still do and always will. But I don’t think every Republican feels that way. I certainly don’t.

    I don’t hate either of them.  But I am leery of political dynasties in this country when based on family.  However, I’d like to see a Republican dynasty dominate until I croak . . .

    Aside:  I’d love to see Youngkin and Sears alternate running for Governor of Virginia the next three elections.

    • #4
  5. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Franco (View Comment):
    That Jeb actually said at one point that he just “happened to have the same last name” shows how depraved they are.

    My second favorite Jeb moment when he tried to claim to be a political outsider. 

    My first will always be “Please clap” 

    • #5
  6. DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax)
    @DonG

    He is known simply as “P.”   The “P” is short for “Prescott”, who was the original d-bag in the family.   P. draws his strength from RGV (Rio Grand Valley) which has a large Hispanic population.  P. considers himself Latino.   I have not seen any ads for the run-off for AG. 

    • #6
  7. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    What’s that expression? Oh yea, “Live by the sword, die by the sword.” I do not have the slightest idea who this new Bush is. G.P. Bush? That’s just great! How about this, G.P., go do something significant that truly establishes you as an independent and capable person, then come back and we can talk. Until then, you’re just using your family name because you think it will benefit you. Well, guess what, you’re 20 years late and too many stupid, mean, and harmful Bush family statements against conservatives to have anything but my disgust. Like I said, “Live by the Bush name, die by the Bush name  (figuratively, of course)”.

    • #7
  8. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Having observed him for some time now, he is totally a GOPe creature.  As Land Commissioner he supported a total remake of the Alamo that is was popular with maybe 10 percent of Texans (it’s mostly shut down now). He’s a total phony who needs to get a real job.  We have a large cohort of GOPe Texas politicians, although we keep running them off.  The last two house speakers were part of it. I expect a bunch more to go this time.

    • #8
  9. Ole Summers Member
    Ole Summers
    @OleSummers

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Having observed him for some time now, he is totally a GOPe creature. As Land Commissioner he supported a total remake of the Alamo that is was popular with maybe 10 percent of Texans (it’s mostly shut down now). He’s a total phony who needs to get a real job. We have a large cohort of GOPe Texas politicians, although we keep running them off. The last two house speakers were part of it. I expect a bunch more to go this time.

    His attempt to build a political career with the Land Commission was (for me) a bust if no other reason than the “reimagine the Alamo” project – Paxton has done a good, consistent job of fighting back against the D.C. intrusions and I believe P. thought he had an opening because of some of Paxton’ legal “problems” stemming from Collin County which have pretty well been shown to be bogus attempts to create charges against some Rs who actual act conservatively. I also have not heard many adds for the AG race except a few by Bush proclaiming how he would shut down the border , etc, etc ……. something that sounds rather strange with the Bush name behind it!

    • #9
  10. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The people who hated 41 and 43 still do and always will. But I don’t think every Republican feels that way. I certainly don’t.

    I had some skepticism of GHW Bush around him being swampy, but I bought into Bush the Second as being less GOPe and more common-man type. Less globalist. Better than Gore, better than Kerry. By 2006 I was again skeptical and questioning W.’s commitment to little things like our borders and our Supreme Court Justices (Harriet Meirs). 

    But it was only after seeing Jeb throw his hat into the ring in 2015 that was was red-pilled. I couldn’t believe it. Such a brazenly dynastic move – and when the opponent was sure to be Hillary Clinton! Had Trump not been in the game he could’ve won the nomination and would have certainly lost to Hillary as anyone with two IQ points to rub together would predict. 

    Then there was all the snubbing of all things Trumpian and the sabotage.

    Hate would be too strong a word – but contempt and distain? Yes. 

    They they have managed to alienate a lot of former supporters, make no mistake.

    • #10
  11. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Franco (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):

    The people who hated 41 and 43 still do and always will. But I don’t think every Republican feels that way. I certainly don’t.

    I had some skepticism of GHW Bush around him being swampy, but I bought into Bush the Second as being less GOPe and more common-man type. Less globalist. Better than Gore, better than Kerry. By 2006 I was again skeptical and questioning W.’s commitment to little things like our borders and our Supreme Court Justices (Harriet Meirs).

    But it was only after seeing Jeb throw his hat into the ring in 2015 that was was red-pilled. I couldn’t believe it. Such a brazenly dynastic move – and when the opponent was sure to be Hillary Clinton! Had Trump not been in the game he could’ve won the nomination and would have certainly lost to Hillary as anyone with two IQ points to rub together would predict.

    Then there was all the snubbing of all things Trumpian and the sabotage.

    Hate would be too strong a word – but contempt and distain? Yes.

    They they have managed to alienate a lot of former supporters, make no mistake.

    Agree with all of the above but I also believe that the Bushes are bewildered by the whole thing.  They truly can’t understand what’s going on.  

    • #11
  12. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    The “dynasty” references really bother me. They are reminiscent of the Bolsheviks’ killing the entire Russian royal family.

    We do not have dynasties in the United States. In the United States, you can succeed in spite of who your parents are.

    Raise your hand if you have observed among your family and friends and acquaintances kids entering the same professional fields as their parents or grandparents. It always makes me smile when I see it. It’s so obvious why that happens. Partly genetics, but more likely the kids grew up immersed in their parents’ professional life and they were comfortable there. It’s not a dynastic phenomenon. Just a family thing.

    If you don’t want to vote for Jeb Bush because of his policies as governor of Florida, fine. But don’t vote against him just because of his last name.

    • #12
  13. Henry Racette killed the Black Dahlia Member
    Henry Racette killed the Black Dahlia
    @Misthiocracy

    Victor Tango Kilo: America really shouldn’t have political dynasties anyway.

    On the one hand: One could argue that America shouldn’t really have a cursus honorum to the Presidency either.  It just feels greasy for a politician to run for an office for the sole reason that it’s a stepping stone to a higher office.

    On the other hand: One could also argue that this is the natural result of term limits.  A politician in a term-limited job has to be thinking about their next job.

    • #13
  14. DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax)
    @DonG

    MarciN (View Comment):
    If you don’t want to vote for Jeb Bush because of his policies as governor of Florida, fine. But don’t vote against him just because of his last name.

    You should vote against all Bushes, because they are swamp-loving elitists that will work to make things worse for Americans.

    • #14
  15. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Tex929rr (View Comment):
    Having observed him for some time now, he is totally a GOPe creature.  As Land Commissioner he supported a total remake of the Alamo that is was popular with maybe 10 percent of Texans (it’s mostly shut down now).

    I was just there this morning. My wife’s in town for a medical procedure. Took my daughter while she’s resting in the hotel. Assume you’re taking about the building being built behind it? A few moisture monitoring stations too. The church was still open but had to get timed tickets to enter.

    • #15
  16. mildlyo Member
    mildlyo
    @mildlyo

    If we let another Bush in, the Clintons are sure to follow…

    • #16
  17. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Raise your hand if you have observed among your family and friends and acquaintances kids entering the same professional fields as their parents or grandparents.

    :: Keeps hands down ::

    Sorry, that doesn’t happen among my class of people.

    • #17
  18. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Raise your hand if you have observed among your family and friends and acquaintances kids entering the same professional fields as their parents or grandparents.

    :: Keeps hands down ::

    Sorry, that doesn’t happen among my class of people.

    Perhaps it’s just the families I know. My nephew is in the Air Force, and all four of his kids are now in the military. Our local police chief’s son went into the military. My neighbor was a teacher and so is her daughter. Our local fire chief’s son is now a fire fighter. I could go on and on. The kids are very comfortable in the professional fields their parents were in. It has something to do with family dinner. :-) It’s certainly not always true, but it’s true often enough that it seems completely understandable to me. 

    • #18
  19. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    MarciN (View Comment):
    We do not have dynasties in the United States.

    The Bushes, Kennedies, Udalls, Romneys, Browns,  Cuomo’s, and Rockefellers should beg to differ. 

    The Dingell family has held the same Michigan Congressional seat for almost ninety years. 

    • #19
  20. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MarciN (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Raise your hand if you have observed among your family and friends and acquaintances kids entering the same professional fields as their parents or grandparents.

    :: Keeps hands down ::

    Sorry, that doesn’t happen among my class of people.

    Perhaps it’s just the families I know. My nephew is in the Air Force, and all four of his kids are now in the military. Our local police chief’s son went into the military. My neighbor was a teacher and so is her daughter. Our local fire chief’s son is now a fire fighter. I could go on and on. The kids are very comfortable in the professional fields their parents were in. It has something to do with family dinner. :-) It’s certainly not always true, but it’s true often enough that it seems completely understandable to me.

    Oh, I know what you mean. But when you said “professional field,” I was thinking about doctors, lawyers, . . . politicians (spits), . . . white collar professions. And my family is not that.

     

     

    • #20
  21. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

     Assume you’re taking about the building being built behind it? A few moisture monitoring stations too. The church was still open but had to get timed tickets to enter.

    I wish it was that simple.  The actual battle ground covered a good portion of what is now Alamo Plaza.  One of the defender’s cannons was in a location that is now a post office lobby across an intersection.  The plan involved moving the Cenotaph and enclosing the entire plaza in glass walls (I am not making this up), making it all part of the monument and buying out all the businesses across the plaza.  But of course not the Menger Hotel, etc.  it was really a very elitist interpretation of how to handle things.  If you read the history, like many historical sites the Alamo was used for unrelated commercial purposes and commercial businesses grew in the haphazard way that they always do.  I always figured the Alamo defenders fought for freedom from tyranny and a t shirt shop wouldn’t cause them any heartburn.  David Crockett probably would have sold autographed  souvenirs if the Tejamos had won. 

    • #21
  22. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Henry Racette killed the Black… (View Comment):

    Victor Tango Kilo: America really shouldn’t have political dynasties anyway.

    On the one hand: One could argue that America shouldn’t really have a cursus honorum to the Presidency either. It just feels greasy for a politician to run for an office for the sole reason that it’s a stepping stone to a higher office.

    On the other hand: One could also argue that this is the natural result of term limits. A politician in a term-limited job has to be thinking about their next job.

    But why do they apparently just assume that their next job must also be in politics?

    • #22
  23. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Racette killed the Black… (View Comment):

    Victor Tango Kilo: America really shouldn’t have political dynasties anyway.

    On the one hand: One could argue that America shouldn’t really have a cursus honorum to the Presidency either. It just feels greasy for a politician to run for an office for the sole reason that it’s a stepping stone to a higher office.

    On the other hand: One could also argue that this is the natural result of term limits. A politician in a term-limited job has to be thinking about their next job.

    But why do they apparently just assume that their next job must also be in politics?’

    They don’t know how to do anything else. They never learned any skills.

    • #23
  24. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Henry Racette killed the Black… (View Comment):
    On the one hand: One could argue that America shouldn’t really have a cursus honorum to the Presidency either.

    America ceased being a Republic during the Wilson Administration. America is an Empire. Within empires, political power is hereditary; with the occasional exception that succeeds through attachment to inherited political power like Obama. 

    • #24
  25. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    Henry Racette killed the Black… (View Comment):
    On the one hand: One could argue that America shouldn’t really have a cursus honorum to the Presidency either.

    America ceased being a Republic during the Wilson Administration. America is an Empire. Within empires, political power is hereditary; with the occasional exception that succeeds through attachment to inherited political power like Obama.

    Next Up: “Star Spangled Banner” replaced by “Imperial March” from Star Wars.

     

    • #25
  26. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Assume you’re taking about the building being built behind it? A few moisture monitoring stations too. The church was still open but had to get timed tickets to enter.

    I wish it was that simple. The actual battle ground covered a good portion of what is now Alamo Plaza. One of the defender’s cannons was in a location that is now a post office lobby across an intersection. The plan involved moving the Cenotaph and enclosing the entire plaza in glass walls (I am not making this up), making it all part of the monument and buying out all the businesses across the plaza. But of course not the Menger Hotel, etc. it was really a very elitist interpretation of how to handle things. If you read the history, like many historical sites the Alamo was used for unrelated commercial purposes and commercial businesses grew in the haphazard way that they always do. I always figured the Alamo defenders fought for freedom from tyranny and a t shirt shop wouldn’t cause them any heartburn. David Crockett probably would have sold autographed souvenirs if the Tejamos had won.

    Thanks for the explanation. I’m always torn by how much to preserve and how much to let new generations build. Read an article many years ago with the theory that Venice is having water levels problems because too much preservation is going on. The thought was people in the past would year down things and build up on the rubble. Now too much is being kept the same for the tourists.

    There were quite a few different models showing how the Alamo changed over the years. Sometimes it was commercial.

    • #26
  27. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    No more Bushes, Clintons, Reagans, McCains, Cheneys, Obamas, McConnells, and so forth.

    I won’t vote for a Bush.  I won’t for anybody a Bush endorses*.

    • #27
  28. Ole Summers Member
    Ole Summers
    @OleSummers

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Assume you’re taking about the building being built behind it? A few moisture monitoring stations too. The church was still open but had to get timed tickets to enter.

    I wish it was that simple. The actual battle ground covered a good portion of what is now Alamo Plaza. One of the defender’s cannons was in a location that is now a post office lobby across an intersection. The plan involved moving the Cenotaph and enclosing the entire plaza in glass walls (I am not making this up), making it all part of the monument and buying out all the businesses across the plaza. But of course not the Menger Hotel, etc. it was really a very elitist interpretation of how to handle things. If you read the history, like many historical sites the Alamo was used for unrelated commercial purposes and commercial businesses grew in the haphazard way that they always do. I always figured the Alamo defenders fought for freedom from tyranny and a t shirt shop wouldn’t cause them any heartburn. David Crockett probably would have sold autographed souvenirs if the Tejamos had won.

    Thanks for the explanation. I’m always torn by how much to preserve and how much to let new generations build. Read an article many years ago with the theory that Venice is having water levels problems because too much preservation is going on. The thought was people in the past would year down things and build up on the rubble. Now too much is being kept the same for the tourists.

    There were quite a few different models showing how the Alamo changed over the years. Sometimes it was commercial.

    Tex gave a good explanation of a complicated situation. Not only does the original mission take in so much ground and giving a true picture of the actual conditions at the time of the fight when the city of San Antonio was across the river (which has been re-routed to provide the River Walk) but the original grounds are in three different hands – the iconic Chapel has been handled by the Daughters of the Texas Revolution for almost 100 years, the area to the front and the south are the city’s and the rest (like the Crockett Hotel) is private property -soooooo, it becomes more than a problem getting all three to agree to anything. But there are some serious structural issues that have to be addressed – which began what became a political dance instead of realistic attempt to save valuable history

    • #28
  29. Ole Summers Member
    Ole Summers
    @OleSummers

    I’ll add that the structure issues are with the Chapel and the Cenotaph which is really in bad shape.

    • #29
  30. Hang On Member
    Hang On
    @HangOn

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    We do not have dynasties in the United States.

    The Bushes, Kennedies, Udalls, Romneys, Browns, Cuomo’s, and Rockefellers should beg to differ.

    The Dingell family has held the same Michigan Congressional seat for almost ninety years.

    Nancy Pelosi wouldn’t want you to forget about the D’Alesandros.

    • #30
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