Saving a Life

 

A student emailed me asking if we could meet via Zoom. I vividly remember that night and conversation. Our online chat was unlike any other virtual meeting I have ever had. The young woman was visibly shaken. She recounted any number of negative experiences, including the loss of her job because she stood up against discrimination in the workplace.

She was so distraught about her life that she considered ending it.

I had listened to her for the first half-hour and saw the darkness that enveloped her. In the second half of our hour meeting, I began to speak of hope. I explained that my Christian faith gave me hope. I told her stories about my family and workplace injustices done to me. But I pleaded with her not to give up. I said,

“Get out of bed every morning, thinking, ‘I just need to put one foot in front of the other.”

She spent the last 30 minutes of our conversation in tears.

Honestly, I did not know what would happen. I prayed for my student over the coming weeks. We kept in contact and she finished the semester. But I wondered about her future.

Fast forward two years. This spring I received an email out of the blue from that student. In part, this is what she said,

I’m reaching out to you because I wanted to thank you. I graduated this past December. I owe a great deal of that to you. You inspired me in such a way that no one else has. Your stories pushed me to finish and not give up. I came very close to giving up. Your words inspired me. I am applying to graduate school next year and I owe that to you.

A teacher does not always know what impact his words will have on a student. Sometimes, those words may just save a life. For Truth in Two, this is Dr. Mark Eckel, president of The Comenius Institute, personally thankful for the life-giving hope of Jesus. [Published at MarkEckel.com]

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There are 8 comments.

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  1. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    A great story, Dr. Eckel. Mark Boone, the man who we Ricochetti call Saint Augustine, was first to tip me off to your writing. I don’t often comment on your posts, but I always read them. Thanks. 

    • #1
  2. Mark Eckel Coolidge
    Mark Eckel
    @MarkEckel

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    A great story, Dr. Eckel. Mark Boone, the man who we Ricochetti call Saint Augustine, was first to tip me off to your writing. I don’t often comment on your posts, but I always read them. Thanks.

    @SaintAugustine is a good friend and I’m glad for his generous spirit in recommending my words. And thank YOU for reading them!

    • #2
  3. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Main Feed. Now.

    • #3
  4. Hartmann von Aue Member
    Hartmann von Aue
    @HartmannvonAue

    Percival (View Comment):

    Main Feed. Now.

    What Percy said. 

    • #4
  5. David Carroll Thatcher
    David Carroll
    @DavidCarroll

    Wonderful feedback. Great result. Congratulations.

    • #5
  6. Mark Alexander Coolidge
    Mark Alexander
    @MarkAlexander

    Thank you. Serving all life through Divine Love one Soul at a time.

    • #6
  7. WiesbadenJake Coolidge
    WiesbadenJake
    @WiesbadenJake

    Moments like these that you shared here are, I think, a foretaste of heaven. Gratefulness is a quality that cannot be overvalued and is a wonderful sign of character forged through difficult times. As a fellow teacher I think we often feel as though we are swimming against the tide; these moments are an infusion of energy to continue being who you are. Thankful for you, Mark, and all those who are available and willing to speak the truth in love to those in need.

    • #7
  8. Chris Hutchinson Coolidge
    Chris Hutchinson
    @chrishutch13

    Good stuff, Mark! I was just reading 1 Samuel 23 and thinking about David being right there on the other side of the gorge from Saul. I was thinking about life being so very fragile and all the incredibly close calls we have that would end in tragedy without God’s intervention. Thank you for being God’s instrument.

    • #8
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