Mike Bossy, Rest In Peace

 

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Mike Bossy was a legendary player for the New York Islanders as well as ranked #20 on The Hockey News 100 Greatest NHL Players. He was an instrumental part of the NY Islanders that won four consecutive Stanley Cup championships.

His NHL career was cut short by injuries. He played for 10 seasons. In his tenth season, his back injuries were so painful that a teammate had to lace-up his skates before each game.

Bossy officially retired in October 1988, having played his last game at the young age of 30; he scored 573 goals and 553 assists in 752 NHL games, all with the Islanders.

He was diagnosed with lung cancer;  “On October 19, 2021, Bossy announced that he had been diagnosed with lung cancer. He died in Rosemère on April 15, 2022, at the age of 65.”

From Wikipedia:

Bossy holds several Islanders team records, including as the all-time regular season goals leader with 573. He is also the team leader in career playoff goals with 85, and holds the team single-season record for playoff goals, which he achieved in three straight playoffs starting with 1980–81.

As of 2022, Bossy holds or shares the following NHL records:

Most consecutive 50+ goal seasons: 9
Most 50+ goal seasons (not necessarily consecutive): 9 (tied with Wayne Gretzky and Alexander Ovechkin)
Most 60+ goal seasons (not necessarily consecutive): 5 (tied with Wayne Gretzky)
Highest goals-per-game average, career (minimum 200 total goals): .762 goals per game
Most power-play goals, one playoff season: 9 (tied with Cam Neely)
Most consecutive hat tricks: 3 (tied with Joe Malone, who accomplished this twice)
In January 2017, Bossy was named one of the ‘100 Greatest NHL Players’ in history.

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  1. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    And the great Guy Lafleur died yesterday. He was, as you know @dougwatt, the heir to Maurice Richard and Jean Béliveau. Sportsnet also did a nice tribute to him.

    RIP Mike and Guy.

    • #1
  2. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    I was a diehard Rangers’ fan during the Islanders’ dynasty and hated them with a passion along with their star players, as their fans (including most of my relatives) mocked the Rangers mercilessly.  But time heals all wounds and I found myself profoundly saddened by Mike Bossy’s loss.  He was a great player and the Islanders were a great team.  A piece of my youth leaves with each of their passings.    

    • #2
  3. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Gossamer Cat (View Comment):

    I was a diehard Rangers’ fan during the Islanders’ dynasty and hated them with a passion along with their star players, as their fans (including most of my relatives) mocked the Rangers mercilessly. But time heals all wounds and I found myself profoundly saddened by Mike Bossy’s loss. He was a great player and the Islanders were a great team. A piece of my youth leaves with each of their passings.

    I find that’s true for me as well. Hated Guy, but as I grew older I appreciated how great he was, and how the Montreal-Boston rivalry would have been less if he weren’t there. And as you say, we lose a piece of our youth as the great names of that time slowly pass way.

    • #3
  4. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    I was fortunate to attend a match and seeing Gordie Howe play as a Detroit Red Wing. Although Doc Emrick is still with us he has retired. One of the great sports announcers, along with Vin Sculley. I miss hearing Doc call the game. He could call a pond hockey game and make it sound like a playoff game.

     

    • #4
  5. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    My hometown in NE Ohio was not exactly a hotbed of hockey fans. Cleveland represents the last city to host an NHL franchise that folded. (To be fair, the California Golden Seals weren’t in great shape when they became the Barons.) 

    Like many towns with limited media, the local AM station in my county south of the big city was dominant, still doing 6 and 11 half-hours of news well into the television age. The sports director would do his 5 minutes a night and justify his existence with passable play-by-play coverage of high school football and basketball on the weekends. But he was freaking clueless when it came to the NHL. He would rip and read stories about Lord Stanley’s Cup and pronounce the star of the Habs as “Gahy LaFloor,” the most anglicized pronunciation possible. 

    • #5
  6. The Great Adventure Coolidge
    The Great Adventure
    @TGA

    I grew up in the hometown of Steve Yzerman and the Niedermeyer brothers.  Bossy’s heyday was during my college years when I had lost my attention to the league (girls were vastly more interesting), but I remember Lafleur well.  You see, I grew up as a Bruins fan and despised anything to do with the Canadiens.

    Only NHL game I was ever able to attend was an exhibition game between the Penguins and Kings.  I got to see – at least for the first period – Gretzky and Lemieux play against each other.  Short of seeing Orr and Espo on the ice together, my hockey life was fulfilled.

    • #6
  7. Chris Hutchinson Coolidge
    Chris Hutchinson
    @chrishutch13

    Doug Watt: His NHL career was cut short by injuries. He played for 10 seasons. In his tenth season his back injuries were so painful that a teammate had to lace-up his skates before each game.

    A shame he was so young. I didn’t move up north and get into ice hockey until right after their dynasty so I didn’t get to see some of his best years but this reminded me of one of the most memorable games I ever watched; the four overtime game 7 between the Islanders and Caps on Easter morning in 1987. What an amazing game that was! Bossy had played earlier in the series. I knew he’d had back problems but I thought after the Islanders coming back from being down 3-1 he might try to play that game. He didn’t but they still pulled it out with some amazing saves by Kelly Hrudey and overtime goal from Pat LaFontaine. I don’t think Bossy ever played again after that series. 

    • #7
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