The Dzhanibekov Effect: If You Are an Old-Timey Scientific American, You Will Like this Video

 

For years, the subtype of Homo americanus called “scientific American” was a market demographic big enough, rich enough, and loose enough with a buck to support the eponymous magazine.

(Note: Sadly, the magazine died about two decades ago, and was absorbed by the propaganda forces of the proggy church, which deceitfully maintained the name, in accordance with their doctrine.)

If you are one of those fanatically dedicated amateurs, I guarantee you will love this video, or your money back.

 

The unwritten Code of Conduct might require me to give you, the reader, some content, not just a link to the content.

Here, then.  It involves a mysterious physical phenomenon: some spinning objects sometimes suddenly flip over and start spinning in the opposite direction!

I could also give you this content: the USSR came up with a theory about it and tried to keep it secret for years!

But that’s all I can say.  If you are one of US, and not one of THEM, you will watch the video, and then share your thoughts with me, because I am one of you.

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  1. Addiction Is A Choice Member
    Addiction Is A Choice
    @AddictionIsAChoice

    Mark Camp: (Note: Sadly, the magazine died about two decades ago, and was absorbed by the propaganda forces of the proggy church, which deceitfully maintained the name, in accordance with their doctrine.)

    You mean this doctrine?

    • #1
  2. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    If something is spinning a certain direction, and then flips over, isn’t it already/automatically spinning in the opposite direction?

    • #2
  3. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    Mark, this is really cool.

    I suspect that “Dzhanibekov” is the Russian word for “have I had one too many Stolis, or did I really see that?”

    • #3
  4. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    I don’t know what’s wrong with me but it didn’t seem odd to me, and when he flipped the tennis racket I thought, yes that’s why it didn’t seem odd. And by the way it’s a miracle I kept watching after I saw the words “differential equations.”

    • #4
  5. Limestone Cowboy Coolidge
    Limestone Cowboy
    @LimestoneCowboy

    Addiction Is A Choice (View Comment):

    Mark Camp: (Note: Sadly, the magazine died about two decades ago, and was absorbed by the propaganda forces of the proggy church, which deceitfully maintained the name, in accordance with their doctrine.)

    You mean this doctrine?

     

    • #5
  6. Flapjack Lincoln
    Flapjack
    @Flapjack

    That is really cool.  Thanks for sharing!

    • #6
  7. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Limestone Cowboy (View Comment):

    Addiction Is A Choice (View Comment):

    Mark Camp: (Note: Sadly, the magazine died about two decades ago, and was absorbed by the propaganda forces of the proggy church, which deceitfully maintained the name, in accordance with their doctrine.)

    You mean this doctrine?

     

    Was there supposed to be a comment here?

    • #7
  8. Limestone Cowboy Coolidge
    Limestone Cowboy
    @LimestoneCowboy

    I was introduced to SciAm (SA) in the mid 1960s by my 9th grade science teacher. I read every new issue in the  school  library, and subscribed as soon as I could afford it. It covered an amazing array of articles on the hard sciences  and softer sciences, but it covered them with what I thought was a healthy balance between enthusiastic endorsement and prudent scepticism. Regrettably those times were over by the early 1980s, and I cancelled my subscription. Worse, the prudent scepticism became actively  suppressed. (See climate change, for example.)

    But I became a working scientist for nearly 40 years due in large part to an SA feature called “The Amature Scientist” which showed me that I didn’t need a gazillion dollars to make my contribution to scientific knowledge. My thesis  advisor once told me that he admired my ability to run low cost experiments quickly..  a skill acquired from 15 years  of reading “The Amature Scientist”.

    I truly mourn the corruption and demise of SA. It was formative for me.

    • #8
  9. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    There is a great story about the arcane math that lead to the stealth fighter…

    Back in the old Soviet days it was against the rules to publish any scientific papers in Western journals.  But the math that lead to the Stealth technology was so arcane that the a Soviet censors allowed the math paper to be published.   Fortunately, it was read by a scientist at Lockheed who recognized the import of the arcane math.

     

    • #9
  10. DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax)
    @DonG

    Mark Camp: It involves a mysterious physical phenomenon: some spinning objects sometimes suddenly flip over and start spinning in the opposite direction!

    It is the illusion that it is spinning in the opposite direction that makes it fascinating.  

    • #10
  11. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    I have grokked deeply of the video, and of the mystery of the intermediate axis. But I wonder, if a liberal spins the truth, and it flips its axis and means something else, why does it never return to truth?

    • #11
  12. Max Knots Member
    Max Knots
    @MaxKnots

    This was so cool! Fun stuff Mark. Loved it.

    • #12
  13. Jimmy Carter Member
    Jimmy Carter
    @JimmyCarter

    We may owe Hank Johnson an apology. Perhaps this effect was what He was alluding to back in 2010.

    • #13
  14. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Short answer: because it’s impossible for humans to create a perfectly-balanced object and to spin it perfectly in 3d space.

    • #14
  15. EB Thatcher
    EB
    @EB

    My dad had a subscription for years and each year he got them bound.  Whenever I needed a quick report for any of my high school science-type classes, I just picked a year/month at random and always found something interesting to write about.

    • #15
  16. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Addiction Is A Choice (View Comment):

    Mark Camp: (Note: Sadly, the magazine died about two decades ago, and was absorbed by the propaganda forces of the proggy church, which deceitfully maintained the name, in accordance with their doctrine.)

    You mean this doctrine?

    Yes, but I never saw it expressed so succinctly!

    thx.

    • #16
  17. Henry Racette Member
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    Mark, thank you.

    I have been inflicting the intermediate axis theorem on my children and young relatives for years, usually with a tennis racket as the example. I first noticed it myself during my very brief college career; my roommate the physics major then explained it to me.

    I also have a small collection of rattlebacks, which I find equally amazing. (I give them away to the cousins.)

    • #17
  18. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    kedavis (View Comment):

    If something is spinning a certain direction, and then flips over, isn’t it already/automatically spinning in the opposite direction?

    If it was spinning clockwise at first as viewed from the side of the wings, the spinning comes to a halt, and then it starts spinning counterclockwise, still viewed from the side of the wings.

    It is as if someone twisted it and stopped the spinning, and then spun it in the opposite direction!

    • #18
  19. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    If something is spinning a certain direction, and then flips over, isn’t it already/automatically spinning in the opposite direction?

    If it was spinning clockwise at first as viewed from the side of the wings, the spinning comes to a halt, and then it starts spinning counterclockwise, still viewed from the side of the wings.

    It is as if someone twisted it and stopped the spinning, and then spun it in the opposite direction!

    Yes, I hadn’t seen the video yet.  But I think I explained it in #14.

    • #19
  20. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) (View Comment):

    Mark Camp: It involves a mysterious physical phenomenon: some spinning objects sometimes suddenly flip over and start spinning in the opposite direction!

    It is the illusion that it is spinning in the opposite direction that makes it fascinating.

    Both the somersaults and the spin reversal are real, not illusions.

    • #20
  21. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Mark, thank you.

    I have been inflicting the intermediate axis theorem on my children and young relatives for years, usually with a tennis racket as the example. I first noticed it myself during my very brief college career; my roommate the physics major then explained it to me.

    I also have a small collection of rattlebacks, which I find equally amazing. (I give them away to the cousins.)

    So you found someone who gave you an intuitive explanation, and you have been doing the same thing!  That is very cool.

    It makes the video even more interesting. The host had never seen an intuitive explanation, and one of the greatest physicists in the world couldn’t come up with one either! But the teaching method was old hat for you.

    • #21
  22. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    As other commenters here have said, the problem with Scientific American goes back decades before the blast wave of wokeness. You might say it was ahead of its time.

    It’s not just that it began to reflect a harder and harder political line, which was bad enough, but its whole concept faded. When I was a teenager in the Sixties, SA was hard science all the way, with unusually good color printing. 

    Polaroid was their major sponsor back in those years. Without knowing the numbers, as far as SA is concerned, having a key major sponsor who pre-bought 75% of your upcoming year’s ad inventory is a great boost to the stability of the magazine and its management. About a generation ago it became something very different, sort of a snobbier version of Popular Science (“The ‘What’s New’ Magazine!”) for NPR listeners. 

    • #22
  23. Nohaaj Coolidge
    Nohaaj
    @Nohaaj

    Fascinating. I am not convinced yet about the claim that the Earth will not perform this flip… Isn’t the earth’s core molten? and would it not then react the same way as the liquid filled bottles?  Or is it so perfectly spherical that it does not have the third axis influence? 

    • #23
  24. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    Fascinating. I am not convinced yet about the claim that the Earth will not perform this flip… Isn’t the earth’s core molten? and would it not then react the same way as the liquid filled bottles? Or is it so perfectly spherical that it does not have the third axis influence?

    Nohaaj,

    The host explained why the fear is unfounded.  I can’t remember the explanation, so you should watch the video again and keep an eye out for it.

    If I don’t experience an interruption (it is very difficult for me to watch videos or play podcasts, so I almost never do), I will also find it.

    • #24
  25. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    Fascinating. I am not convinced yet about the claim that the Earth will not perform this flip… Isn’t the earth’s core molten? and would it not then react the same way as the liquid filled bottles? Or is it so perfectly spherical that it does not have the third axis influence?

    Nohaaj,

    The host explained why the fear is unfounded. I can’t remember the explanation, so you should watch the video again and keep an eye out for it.

    If I don’t experience an interruption (it is very difficult for me to watch videos or play podcasts, so I almost never do), I will also find it.

    Nohhaj,

    FOUND IT!

    The earth is spinning about the axis with the highest moment of inertia (not the intermediate axis).

    The highest moment axis (the lowest kinetic energy axis) is stable!

    (Whew.)

    • #25
  26. Henry Racette Member
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    Fascinating. I am not convinced yet about the claim that the Earth will not perform this flip… Isn’t the earth’s core molten? and would it not then react the same way as the liquid filled bottles? Or is it so perfectly spherical that it does not have the third axis influence?

    Nohaaj,

    The host explained why the fear is unfounded. I can’t remember the explanation, so you should watch the video again and keep an eye out for it.

    If I don’t experience an interruption (it is very difficult for me to watch videos or play podcasts, so I almost never do), I will also find it.

    Nohhaj,

    FOUND IT!

    The earth is spinning about the axis with the highest moment of inertia (not the intermediate axis).

    The highest moment axis (the lowest kinetic energy axis) is stable!

    (Whew.)

    So… that thing about Guam? No worries?

    • #26
  27. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    Fascinating. I am not convinced yet about the claim that the Earth will not perform this flip… Isn’t the earth’s core molten? and would it not then react the same way as the liquid filled bottles? Or is it so perfectly spherical that it does not have the third axis influence?

    Nohaaj,

    The host explained why the fear is unfounded. I can’t remember the explanation, so you should watch the video again and keep an eye out for it.

    If I don’t experience an interruption (it is very difficult for me to watch videos or play podcasts, so I almost never do), I will also find it.

    Nohhaj,

    FOUND IT!

    The earth is spinning about the axis with the highest moment of inertia (not the intermediate axis).

    The highest moment axis (the lowest kinetic energy axis) is stable!

    (Whew.)

    So… that thing about Guam? No worries?

    Right.  That Congressman just made it up, to scare conservatives who live on Guam, if there are any ;-)

    • #27
  28. drlorentz Member
    drlorentz
    @drlorentz

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    I have been inflicting the intermediate axis theorem on my children and young relatives for years, usually with a tennis racket as the example. I first noticed it myself during my very brief college career; my roommate the physics major then explained it to me.

     

    As noted, this thing has been common knowledge (among some, anyhow) forever. Contrary to the claim made in the video, it’s been around a lot longer than 150 years. There was a problem on my intermediate mechanics final exam concerning this phenomenon.  According to the author the textbook for that class, the problem was first treated by Euler in 1749. That’s Euler who got a mathematical constant e, named after him.

    I was hoping the video would address the periodicity of the flips but, alas, there was no mention of that. What determines the time between flips? Guess I’ll have to work that out for myself.

     

    • #28
  29. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Mark, thank you.

    I have been inflicting the intermediate axis theorem on my children and young relatives for years, usually with a tennis racket as the example. I first noticed it myself during my very brief college career; my roommate the physics major then explained it to me.

    I also have a small collection of rattlebacks, which I find equally amazing. (I give them away to the cousins.)

    Henry,

    Wikipedia’s article on rattlebacks did NOT give an intuitive explanation for the reversal of spin about the vertical axis.

    What is it, please?

    • #29
  30. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Mark, thank you.

    I have been inflicting the intermediate axis theorem on my children and young relatives for years, usually with a tennis racket as the example.

    Is your explanation based on centrifugal forces, like Prof. Terry Tao’s?

    • #30
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