Elon Musk Does More for the Conservative Base Than the Entire Conservative Movement Has for Decades

 

How far will Elon Musk’s 9.2% stake and new board member seat go to changing the policies of censorship and targeted harassment by ultra-powerful and corrupt Silicon Valley companies? Time will tell. It is clear he is interested in stopping the abuse and censorship from very powerful companies against large segments of this population.

It has been years of harassment and mistreatment at the hands of big tech that enjoys exemptions and protections under the law for being platforms. They get every benefit in the book. They aren’t liable for anything because they are platforms. They’ve long since decided not to behave as a platform and behave as editors and publishers by mass censoring and banning anyone that doesn’t hold the correct orthodoxy. All the GOP has done is howl into the wind about it.

State AGs, FCC commissioners and regulators, Governors, Congress, and the White House under Trump did nothing but complain and moan in the face of this abuse of tens of millions of their base. Everyone cried about their exemptions under the law but have done nothing to change the law. They’ve also issued no laws protecting speech online or on any business that presents itself as an open platform, thus holding them to their claim of what they are. The entire conservative movement has failed and done nothing about years of ongoing flagrant abuse.

Then one day Elon Musk starts asking conservatives on Twitter how they’ve been treated. He says that’s not right. And now he has a board seat. More action from one man than the entire GOP apparatus and government. If we get more free speech in this country as a result of this, thank Elon. As usual, the GOP and conservative movement are worth nothing and deliver nothing.

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  1. drlorentz Member
    drlorentz
    @drlorentz

    Before everyone gets all hot and bothered about Mr. Musk’s purchase of some TWTR stock, keep in mind the following items:

    1. He holds only one seat on the board and owns <10% of the company’s stock.
    2. Twitter is fully stocked with blue-haired, swivel-eyed, looney leftists who implement policy as they see fit. Even if Musk succeeded in making some changes in policy at the corporate level, that doesn’t mean anything would change for most users. They would still get shadow-banned, demoted, or suspended as usual.
    3. It’s not clear what Mr. Musk’s vision of free speech is. It may not be the same as yours.

    Regarding point #2, consider what happened to Mr. Trump over the course of four years. The permanent bureaucracy, deep state, managerial class — call it what you will  — thwarted him at every turn. Mr. Musk has even less authority over Twitter than Mr. Trump had over the executive branch.

    • #31
  2. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    I don’t have to like everything about Musk, I look at the positive’s vs the negatives

    I respect Musk just for his battles with the likes of Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders over federal taxes

    I liked that he moved his company to Texas when CA made his life miserable

    I like his battles against ESG and woke capitalism

    I like that he used his technology to aid those in Ukraine

    I like that he pushes the limits auto, space travel and other areas

     

    • #32
  3. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    If these sites were subject to individual lawsuits from parents who, for example, had a  girl who committed suicide after being bullied online using their platform, they would have to either drastically change how they do business or go out of business.

    This would be a terrible blow to free speech and liberty in general if lawsuits like this were successful and became common.  Every greedy person who had a family member commit suicide would be looking around for a company with deep pockets whom they could blame for hurting the feelings of the deceased.  If a depressed cop kills himself after watching an anti-cop rap video, the family could sue Youtube for hosting the video.  Or Ricochet could be sued because we allowed people to say disparaging things about police officers and the deceased killed himself after reading that thread.

    • #33
  4. WI Con Member
    WI Con
    @WICon

    Not sure I agree with the post’s premise but open to the possibility that it may work out that way – too soon to tell. I applaud and am encouraged by the action and find it a hopeful development in these times.

    I’m interested in how this may affect Trump’s 2024 prospects, considering the problems Truth Social is experiencing. This could be a real blow to Trump’s image. Even worse if it’s perceived that Musk “let him” back on the social media giant & if that re-exposure reminds people what they disliked about him.

    I’ll vote for him if he’s the nominee, but I’d prefer DeSantis. 

    Truth Social, getting owned in the whole Covid-19 thing by Fauci, ‘Prison Reform’/a.k.a. National Prison Break, spending – Trump has some real fails here to be exploited. To be fair, he’s had some tremendous wins (economy, energy, trade, border wall construction, foreign policy) as well. I’d prefer to move on, with DeSantis landing significant, targeted blows vs. swinging wildly. 

    He (Trump) may be the loser on this.

    • #34
  5. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    Well, investing a few billion $ of his own money is already more than the entire conservative movement has done for decades, isn’t it?

    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    • #35
  6. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Before everyone gets all hot and bothered about Mr. Musk’s purchase of some TWTR stock, keep in mind the following items:

    1. He holds only one seat on the board and owns <10% of the company’s stock.
    2. Twitter is fully stocked with blue-haired, swivel-eyed, looney leftists who implement policy as they see fit. Even if Musk succeeded in making some changes in policy at the corporate level, that doesn’t mean anything would change for most users. They would still get shadow-banned, demoted, or suspended as usual.
    3. It’s not clear what Mr. Musk’s vision of free speech is. It may not be the same as yours.

    I don’t know fully how this works, but isn’t a 10% share in a company far below what is needed to be a controlling interest, to be able to fire leadership and change policy?

    • #36
  7. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    I’m thrilled with Elon Musk’s buying so much of Twitter. Gestures matter enormously in our Internet-connected world, and this was an important one. 

    • #37
  8. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Marjorie Reynolds (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Elon Musk speaks out a lot and sometimes he sounds good. However, I take it with a grain of salt. I am not sure about his agenda just yet……..I say this because he was all onboard for AI and the 4th Industrial Revolution and all the stuff the WEF is touting. I saw him interviewed in various forums saying such. We’ll see…

    His awful taste in women and giving his son that stupid name makes me think less of him but we’ll see.

    Is it worse than Jason Lee and then-partner Beth Riesgraf naming their son Pilot Inspektor?

    • #38
  9. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    Well, investing a few billion $ of his own money is already more than the entire conservative movement has done for decades, isn’t it?

    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    I don’t consider the SCOTUS nominees, or anything else done by Trump for that matter, to be accomplishments of the conservative movement/establishment.  Considering they were basically fighting him at every turn, including trying to deny him the nomination/election.

    • #39
  10. Gary Robbins Member
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    GlennAmurgis (View Comment):

    I don’t have to like everything about Musk, I look at the positive’s vs the negatives

    I respect Musk just for his battles with the likes of Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders over federal taxes

    I liked that he moved his company to Texas when CA made his life miserable

    I like his battles against ESG and woke capitalism

    I like that he used his technology to aid those in Ukraine

    I like that he pushes the limits auto, space travel and other areas

    Any one of the five above aspects would be great, but all five is incredible.  

    While Musk is now a U.S. citizen, he was not born in the U.S., nor were his parents U.S. citizens, therefore he, like Arnold Schwarzenegger, is ineligible for the Presidency.  (That’s a constitutional amendment we could use!)

    Musk’s embrace of being a risk-taking entrepreneur reminds me of Reagan.  Would a “Musk Republican” be today’s “Reagan Republican”?  (I am not declaring that, but I am asking that as a question.  Any thoughts?)

    • #40
  11. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    Well, investing a few billion $ of his own money is already more than the entire conservative movement has done for decades, isn’t it?

    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    I don’t consider the SCOTUS nominees, or anything else done by Trump for that matter, to be accomplishments of the conservative movement/establishment. Considering they were basically fighting him at every turn, including trying to deny him the nomination/election.

    If the SCOTUS nominees were not approved by the votes of conservatives or of the establishment, then who voted them in?  And who held up  the vote on Merick Garland during the Obama administration to make three nominees possible?

    • #41
  12. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) (View Comment):
    How are you defining “liberal” here? That word has evolved a lot.

    From what I’ve heard (although he’s spoken about the WEF), he’s not a Lefty radical. I’m just trying to say we shouldn’t think he’s Conservative.

    If he believes in individual liberty and free speech, I don’t care how you classify him. He’s willing to back it up with his cash…I consider him an ally. We are at war with the socialists. Musk is not a socialist.

    • #42
  13. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    Well, investing a few billion $ of his own money is already more than the entire conservative movement has done for decades, isn’t it?

    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    I don’t consider the SCOTUS nominees, or anything else done by Trump for that matter, to be accomplishments of the conservative movement/establishment. Considering they were basically fighting him at every turn, including trying to deny him the nomination/election.

    If the SCOTUS nominees were not approved by the votes of conservatives or of the establishment, then who voted them in? And who held up the vote on Merick Garland during the Obama administration to make three nominees possible?

    I can discount that some because they expected – and some even preferred for – Hillary to win.

    • #43
  14. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    iWe (View Comment):

    Elon Musk has been, on balance, quite excellent.

    He is, nevertheless, a shill for Communist China.

    ???????????

    • #44
  15. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Before everyone gets all hot and bothered about Mr. Musk’s purchase of some TWTR stock, keep in mind the following items:

    1. He holds only one seat on the board and owns <10% of the company’s stock.
    2. Twitter is fully stocked with blue-haired, swivel-eyed, looney leftists who implement policy as they see fit. Even if Musk succeeded in making some changes in policy at the corporate level, that doesn’t mean anything would change for most users. They would still get shadow-banned, demoted, or suspended as usual.
    3. It’s not clear what Mr. Musk’s vision of free speech is. It may not be the same as yours.

    Regarding point #2, consider what happened to Mr. Trump over the course of four years. The permanent bureaucracy, deep state, managerial class — call it what you will — thwarted him at every turn. Mr. Musk has even less authority over Twitter than Mr. Trump had over the executive branch.

    • #45
  16. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming.

    I’m happy to keep dishing it out as long the Republican party keeps lying to me and betraying me.

    • #46
  17. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    The “conservative movement” didn’t install them. Trump did.

    The “conservative movement” is mostly soft-hand dilettantes writing articles in NRO, the Dispatch, and Commentary about how “right-wing populists” are being unfair to corporations.

    • #47
  18. Victor Tango Kilo Member
    Victor Tango Kilo
    @VtheK

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    If the SCOTUS nominees were not approved by the votes of conservatives or of the establishment, then who voted them in? 

    The same establishment conservatives who voted in John Roberts and David Souter.

    • #48
  19. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    Well what alternatives are their for conservatives without the GOP?

    • #49
  20. drlorentz Member
    drlorentz
    @drlorentz

    Django (View Comment):

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Before everyone gets all hot and bothered about Mr. Musk’s purchase of some TWTR stock, keep in mind the following items:

    1. He holds only one seat on the board and owns <10% of the company’s stock.
    2. Twitter is fully stocked with blue-haired, swivel-eyed, looney leftists who implement policy as they see fit. Even if Musk succeeded in making some changes in policy at the corporate level, that doesn’t mean anything would change for most users. They would still get shadow-banned, demoted, or suspended as usual.
    3. It’s not clear what Mr. Musk’s vision of free speech is. It may not be the same as yours.

    Regarding point #2, consider what happened to Mr. Trump over the course of four years. The permanent bureaucracy, deep state, managerial class — call it what you will — thwarted him at every turn. Mr. Musk has even less authority over Twitter than Mr. Trump had over the executive branch.

    Much as I enjoy Catturd’s posts, this is pure copium. The key word here is “trying.”

    • #50
  21. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    The “conservative movement” didn’t install them. Trump did.

    You can try all you want to discredit the GOP, but you cannot avoid the fact that they put three conservative judges on the Supreme Court.  The first nomination, Neil Gorsuch, was laid in Trump’s lap by the Republican Congress and Mitch McConnell, after blocking the nomination of Merrick Garland during the Obama administration.  They caught Hell for that but stood their ground, even in the face of a predicted Hillary victory.  Trump had absolutely nothing to do with obtaining this empty slot except finding someone to fill it.  Besides, Trump doesn’t know a thing about conservative judges.  He enlisted the help of another conservative organization, The Federalist Society, to find good candidates.  Are they just RHINOS  and Bush Establishment people, too? 

    Trump is not the only conservative politician (if you even want to categorize him as that)  in the entire country, but sometimes people treat him as such.

     

    • #51
  22. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    If the SCOTUS nominees were not approved by the votes of conservatives or of the establishment, then who voted them in?

    The same establishment conservatives who voted in John Roberts and David Souter.

    Nope.  Souter was voted in by a whole different slate of Senators 32 years ago.  Roberts was 17 years ago.

    • #52
  23. Henry Racette Member
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    Victor Tango Kilo (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    How does buying 10% of Twitter stock even remotely compare to installing three Conservative Supreme Court Justices?

    The “conservative movement” didn’t install them. Trump did.

    The “conservative movement” is mostly soft-hand dilettantes writing articles in NRO, the Dispatch, and Commentary about how “right-wing populists” are being unfair to corporations.

    Who gets to define what “the conservative movement” is?

    Was Reagan part of it? Is Musk’s purchase of Twitter stock on a par with Reagan’s contribution to ending the cold war and re-invigorating the American economy?

    Was Trump part of it? Wasn’t his election, with its call for a return to American greatness, a fundamentally conservative effort? Certainly the conservatives I know voted for him. Was the energy boom that Trump encouraged with his pro-business, pro-energy policies less meaningful than acquiring a 9% stake in Twitter?

    Like everyone else here, I hope Musk is able to influence Twitter and make it a more open, free-speech platform. That would be almost as good as simply shutting the damn thing down. Musk is a man who grew fabulously wealthy making electric cars that wouldn’t sell without hefty tax subsidies. He makes great stuff, and he’s interesting and probably conservative. I’m glad he bought into Twitter and I hope he makes a difference.

    But there’s something a little juvenile about celebrating a largely unknown newcomer who makes a flamboyant gesture and simultaneously throwing everyone and all their significant efforts under the bus. It’s a real Next Big Thing kind of move, and it isn’t something thoughtful people do.

    It is, however, what people do when they’re willing to trash without regard to the consequences, because they’d rather be revolutionary than conservative. Never-Trumpers fall into that category, as do the vehement anti-Republican folk.

    • #53
  24. Suspira Member
    Suspira
    @Suspira

    I ❤️ Elon Musk. He’s an idea guy and a doer. He’s rich as Croesus, but keeps on working. He’s wonderfully weird. In a time when conformity is highly regarded, he’s a nonconformist on steroids. Sure, he’s as capable of doing something appalling as something great, but all in all, he’s a breath of fresh air.

    • #54
  25. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Like everyone else here, I hope Musk is able to influence Twitter and make it a more open, free-speech platform. That would be almost as good as simply shutting the damn thing down. Musk is a man who grew fabulously wealthy making electric cars that wouldn’t sell without hefty tax subsidies. He makes great stuff, and he’s interesting and probably conservative. I’m glad he bought into Twitter and I hope he makes a difference.

    I’m also skeptical of the Twitter stock buy.  If Twitter were to completely allow everyone to Tweet, or completely disappear overnight, I don’t think it will make a hill of beans difference in our country or in our politics.  I never liked Twitter even before they started canceling conservatives.  What is so great about a medium that limits your speech to 100 or so characters?  I don’t even like it when someone posts a link to a Tweet because I know automatically that it is going to be some shallow sound-byte.  We’ve got too much of that these days.

    • #55
  26. Marjorie Reynolds Coolidge
    Marjorie Reynolds
    @MarjorieReynolds

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Marjorie Reynolds (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Elon Musk speaks out a lot and sometimes he sounds good. However, I take it with a grain of salt. I am not sure about his agenda just yet……..I say this because he was all onboard for AI and the 4th Industrial Revolution and all the stuff the WEF is touting. I saw him interviewed in various forums saying such. We’ll see…

    His awful taste in women and giving his son that stupid name makes me think less of him but we’ll see.

    Is it worse than Jason Lee and then-partner Beth Riesgraf naming their son Pilot Inspektor?

    Well at least you can pronounce Pilot Inspektor 

    • #56
  27. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) (View Comment):
    How are you defining “liberal” here? That word has evolved a lot.

    From what I’ve heard (although he’s spoken about the WEF), he’s not a Lefty radical. I’m just trying to say we shouldn’t think he’s Conservative.

    Musk is not a “Republican” conservative, but he’s a lot more conservative than some Republican senators; Romney, for example.

    • #57
  28. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Before everyone gets all hot and bothered about Mr. Musk’s purchase of some TWTR stock, keep in mind the following items:

    1. He holds only one seat on the board and owns <10% of the company’s stock.
    2. Twitter is fully stocked with blue-haired, swivel-eyed, looney leftists who implement policy as they see fit. Even if Musk succeeded in making some changes in policy at the corporate level, that doesn’t mean anything would change for most users. They would still get shadow-banned, demoted, or suspended as usual.
    3. It’s not clear what Mr. Musk’s vision of free speech is. It may not be the same as yours.

    Regarding point #2, consider what happened to Mr. Trump over the course of four years. The permanent bureaucracy, deep state, managerial class — call it what you will — thwarted him at every turn. Mr. Musk has even less authority over Twitter than Mr. Trump had over the executive branch.

    Much as I enjoy Catturd’s posts, this is pure copium. The key word here is “trying.”

    No one said Musk will succeed. As you said, the key is that he is trying. That is worth notice. 

    • #58
  29. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    GlenEisenhardt (View Comment):

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    Twitter doesn’t charge it’s members anything and doesn’t pay for content.

    Twitter charges by taking people’s data and selling it to advertisers and other people and companies using their platform for profit. If ricochet wants to ban me they can but they have to stop taking my money from my bank account and if need be refund me for a service I didn’t get for a full month despite being charged. Twitter as far as I know never deletes or stop using data. They took my payment which was my data and in exchange they deliver the service. I think many peoples data are still being recycled by Twitter and sold. I have no reason to believe it isn’t. They get all your data and keep it. If they want to keep it and keep using it then they need to keep service going. Many of these big tech companies operate this way. And they continue to sell to market research firms and advertising and statistics operations long after people have been denied service. It should cost Twitter to ban people. Just like it costs any company to refuse your business. As far as I know they pay no cost. And no one bans more people than big tech. The average business anywhere isn’t telling half their customers they’re not welcome. Only big tech does this.

    Yes. The users of those sites aren’t the customers, they are the product.

    • #59
  30. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Always good to see the usual anti-GOP rant. The last thing we need is constructive feedback and unity on the right.

    I’m glad Musk took a big stake in Twitter. What comes of it is, as you point out, yet to be seen, so your “he’s done more than…” blather is just that. But I also hope for good things.

    In the meantime, keep the anti-Republican hyperbole coming. November isn’t a shoo-in, so whatever you can do to weaken the enthusiasm and resolve of the only party standing between Democrats and America is, you know, helpful.

    We aren’t allowed to critique our own? Are we to be afraid of “triggers” and “micro-aggressions,” like our friends on the left? How is the conservative movement to grow if we remain satisfied with its present accomplishments (such as they are)?

    • #60
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