The Coming Storm

 

I tend to do what I do best, procrastinate. Well, to feel better about myself, I like to think I am prioritizing. Either way, I have felt compelled to write about this supply chain crisis since White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki claimed President Joe Biden saved Christmas on Dec. 22. Nothing gets my blood boiling more than utter lies thrown in my face. How can someone say something so stupid, and how can so many people actually believe it? We have all seen the empty shelves for randomly illogical items, starting with toilet paper and now cat food.

With a very small engineering firm, there is a larger supply chain crisis that will be coming to a head in three to six months. We can’t get parts. I could go off on tangents, but let’s focus on just one major device. A PLC, or programmable logic controller, is a computer that runs actual stuff. Not things like a washer and dryer but how about the water that comes into your house, the water that leaves, the drawbridge that needs to go up, the MRI you desperately need. Almost everything you touch that is manmade uses one of these controllers at some point in the process.

To fulfill orders, my competition and I have been looking for other sources and substituting wherever we can. This is from sketchy suppliers to used parts on eBay. Now these people jacked the price up tenfold, and they are running out. New bids, which are mostly municipal, are getting a huge surcharge because we have no idea what something is going to cost or even if we can fulfill it. Many parts now have a six-month lead time. That means we won’t deliver, but we will be glad to take your money.

My medical controls experience is limited to a heart catheter surgical kit. It isn’t much, but I can’t change a fuse on the machine without a trail of paperwork, and don’t even try substituting anything. Major production companies will start slowing or shutting down because they are unable to get spare parts.

In the wastewater industry, most communities have 20-year-old equipment and older. That’s like 105 human years. Should one piece of this system fail, they may find replacement parts are just not available. When this happens, all you’ll hear on the news is there was a water main break. Here is an insider secret. It is almost never a water main break. It’s usually someone like me who hit the wrong key.

Other machines and systems are not so dramatic. But the problems are starting to add up and will soon hurt you in ways you will never know. Perhaps they are a product of these random shortages we are seeing. Toilet paper and cat food use the same controller. The terrible thing is we have a lot of work pending and are about to lay off workers that have nothing to do because we just can’t get parts. I have never seen anything like this, so I can’t even speculate.

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  1. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    So, Intel is going to open a new plant someday. They closed a huge plant near me a few years back…

    https://www.wickedlocal.com/story/hudson-sun/2015/11/03/intel-final-stages-plant-closing/33170491007/

    So if successful its a net gain of zero. 

    • #31
  2. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    Better to start now then.

    • #32
  3. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    DaveSchmidt (View Comment):

    Yikes!!

    That about sums it up………

    • #33
  4. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The Scarecrow
    @TheScarecrow

    Plus, these new plants run on electricity, which we are also running out of. Power plants are being shut down for “environmental” reasons. There are rolling blackouts; this will not improve for a few years even if we ramped up construction of new power plants (which would take a miracle – talk about permitting problems!). And again, where would the new power plant construction projects get their PVC fittings and micro chips?

    So electricity is going to get very expensive, and then become unreliable. The people driving Teslas will be walking.

    But soon so will the rest of us, because gas pumps need replacement parts too. 

    Everything we do and use and depend on requires lots of maintenance. Waaay more than most people realize. And lots and lots more tiny parts these days, because everything had to be built “smart”. Why? I guess because we could. Most of those tiny parts are critical, so almost everything we use today is much more fragile and in danger of failing than it could have been.

    What’s going to happen to all the South, once air conditioner parts become unavailable?

    • #34
  5. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    So, Intel is going to open a new plant someday. They closed a huge plant near me a few years back…

    https://www.wickedlocal.com/story/hudson-sun/2015/11/03/intel-final-stages-plant-closing/33170491007/

    So if successful its a net gain of zero.

    An old friend of mine lives in Hudson, MA. We lived in Boston up until 2003. Hearing about plants closing like this (under Obama) was disturbing. I saw this financial guru that sometimes posts through the Glenn Beck program that I get on my phone, say that the chip shortage is the next big shoe to drop. It take minerals to make a lot of these products and that is why Russia and China are moving their chess pieces across the world and under sea – to claim mineral rights. Yes – everything runs on these things and we should have known that depending on a communist country to manufacture most of them was a bad idea. I’m surprised Trump didn’t harp on this and get things going. I guess he had his hands full – I think we are going to see the SHTF –

    • #35
  6. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):
    Plus, these new plants run on electricity, which we are also running out of.

    Lots and lots of electricity. In the 1980s and 1990s I worked for a small semiconductor manufacturer (the company manufactured and sold its own chip designs for communication products; it was not a commercial fab for others). I was astonished when I learned how much electricity that relatively small plant consumed. 

    • #36
  7. Phil Turmel Inactive
    Phil Turmel
    @PhilTurmel

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    So, Intel is going to open a new plant someday. They closed a huge plant near me a few years back…

    https://www.wickedlocal.com/story/hudson-sun/2015/11/03/intel-final-stages-plant-closing/33170491007/

    So if successful its a net gain of zero. 

    You are in a deep blue state. That matters.

    • #37
  8. DonG (CAGW is a hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a hoax)
    @DonG

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):
    I am in medium-big construction. Hotels. It takes a year to build one, with a year of civil planning and site work before that.  And I don’t know how long before that to do the architectural design and line up all the permits. How is anyone going to build a factory, staff and train workers, and get production rolling in time to help any of us with the things mentioned in these comments above?

    The only way to add capacity quickly is to add shifts/overtime.  But if there are not workers that can’t happen.  If the manufacturing inputs cannot be increased more shifts won’t help.   In the real world, companies are reducing hours, because of staffing shortages.    Oh, another problem with expansion is getting loans.  We are in an economy where more risk is bad.

    • #38
  9. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    If they can get the outlet boxes…

    • #39
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    If they can get the outlet boxes…

    At least Ohio doesn’t have rolling blackouts.

    • #40
  11. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):
    The multiplier effect of taking so many healthy people out of society leaves that society constantly stumbling. A stumbling society that fails to produce the goods and services on which the society has come to rely. Which as outlined in the original post creates risks. Risks that include public health risks. What happens when a water treatment or a sewage treatment plant fails and can’t be repaired? When electrical power is out because a transformer can’t be replaced? Risks that may be much larger than the risks of the disease itself. 

    Yes. And you don’t have to believe crazy stuff about covid to support this view.

    • #41
  12. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    If they can get the outlet boxes…

    At least Ohio doesn’t have rolling blackouts.

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Cal Lawton (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    At some point, hopefully the wider profit margins and lack of availability elsewhere will motivate some companies to bring back/restart production of some of these items in the US. Some older facilities could be re-opened/re-purposed since a lot of the chips involved are earlier/simpler designs that don’t require the very latest production technology.

    It’s already started.

    Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

    So excited for the first deliveries in 2028!

    Maybe 2031.

    No later than 2034. Probably…

    If they can get the outlet boxes…

    At least Ohio doesn’t have rolling blackouts.

    Yet.

    • #42
  13. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    I haven’t bothered to look for confirmation, but I hear Jeep has had to drastically reduce production due to chip shortages. I imagine that’s true, or will be shortly, throughout the automotive industry. 

    We Chauvinists work for a small company that tests parts for radiation hardness for qualification in environments where they might experience exposure (space — satellites) and, ahem, defense applications. We only test a small number of parts at a time for our customers, so we generally haven’t taken the supply chain hit. Yet. 

    But, it’s made me squirrely about the apparent near-term potential for technological end-times. Imagine if your satellite-dependent communications just up and quit one day. If you dare. And imagine if China, emboldened by American weakness, makes a move on Taiwan with their huge chip manufacturing industry. 

    I disagree with the idea that this all started with the lockdowns. This started with offshoring of American industry with the blessing of both political parties. And, then the Clinton administration, just to give themselves all the good feels they could stand, because they were going to end the nuclear threat (by becoming weaker and stupider), put a moratorium on nuclear effects testing, thereby retiring all the built-up expertise (gray beards) in that area. The arrogance of the ruling class is just astonishing. They really don’t have a clue how the world works.

    • #43
  14. Matthew Singer Inactive
    Matthew Singer
    @MatthewSinger

    I work for a company that make infrared cameras.  We’re being quoted min 12 months on FPGA chips.

    ouch

    • #44
  15. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    Those of us who have been lucky enough to follow Stew Peters over at RedVoiceMedia.com have learned something very troubling and very curious about the supply chain crisis.

    When Biden stated that the fact that goods on container ships could not be off loaded onto the solid ground of Southern Calif ports, and that this was due to the unvaccinated, then most  logically thinking people thought this remark was further proof of his being a nutcase.

    But the statement is a true one.

    How so?

    I am forgetting the name of the attorney Peters interviewed who had studied numerous Pfizer and other vax companies’ contractual agreements with national officials across the world. But the information that attorney revealed was terrifying.

    In these contracts, whichever officials represented their country who signed on to the agreements were agreeing to some very strange demands.

    In exchange for the vaccine material, each nation has agreed that unless some huge percentage of the nation’s populace must be vaccinated. (I am forgetting whether it is 95% or 98% or 100%.)

    Some nations have even made agreements that national resources, including oil, minerals, military equipment and actual armies would be forfeited to the vax company if this and other provisions were not met.

    In Brazil, one official signing off on such a document was found to have accepted a “monetary incentive” for doing this. That official is now in jail.

    Our nation is in a world of hurt. Our mom and pop stores, from NY to WA, from Illinois, WI to Calif, have been shuttered. Suicide rates and suicidal ideations are rampant.

    logically thinking people know this must come to an end.

    But in America, due to our lacking the Parliamentary style of government Britain has, the lack of support for these policies means nothing. We are stuck with the Democrats forever. In all Dem-run states, by the time that elections come around this November, the requirements that to even go into a city council meeting, board of supervisor meeting, etc will be negated for any who do not have a vaccine passport. So even attempting to thwart the Dems in these states is a lost cause.

    1 of 2

     

    • #45
  16. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    2 of 2

    Many reading this will be all: “But I live in the Dakotas, or Wyoming or Nebraska.

    These violations of our national sovereignty came about because of the huge influx of monies that the new Government of Pharma can use to “persuade” people to accept the requirements of these contracts. Unless you are certain that your state legislature, your senators and congress critters cannot be bought out, you can expect your state to flip into this insanity.

    Pfizer was just “awarded” 2 billion dollars recently, of US tax payer monies. Why? It is already receiving 29 billions in profits every financial quarter.

    But buying up american Senators can be pricey, and can cost significantly more than the 100,000 bucks each senator in Bolivia was offered in exchange for Big Water to garner that nation’s water rights two decades ago. (This activity made people despise their government, and then had them move  away from the vulture capital style of economy there, and allowed for the current commie regime.)

     

    • #46
  17. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):

    I keep hearing that this company or that is going to “build a new factory to ramp up production of X”, so don’t worry.

    I am in medium-big construction. Hotels. It takes a year to build one, with a year of civil planning and site work before that. And I don’t know how long before that to do the architectural design and line up all the permits. How is anyone going to build a factory, staff and train workers, and get production rolling in time to help any of us with the things mentioned in these comments above? A water main PLC, chocolate, all of it – we need it now.

    Oh, and how exactly is this new factory going to get built? There are a million moving parts to a construction project, a thousand critical to keep moving forward. If a plumber can’t get any 2” PVC fittings, the project stops. If I can’t get something as simple as outlet boxes (and many are currently in short supply), it stops. This, across all the trades, times 100.

    How is this mythical new factory going to find all the parts it needs, so it can start manufacturing just one of the scarce parts (two years from now)? And if it did somehow, who is going to transport them through the supply chain to eventually get it to me?

    At least in the book (One Second After), it happens all at once – everything electronic stops. So the people all figure out quickly how screwed they are. With our current insanity, the screwing is happening subtly, and people are only now slowly starting to sense something’s wrong.

    Our doom is going to happen, I fear, just like the guy going bankrupt: slowly, then all at once.

    We simply were unable to do anything relating to this actual, foreseeable crisis. All our monies had to go to Homeland Security, and TSA, to ensure that whenever an American boarded a plane, they stood in stocking feet, disassembling their lap top carrier bags to show that inside they had  their  laptop and not an atom bomb.

     

    • #47
  18. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Just wondering, who forces other countries’ armies to become wholly-owned subsidiaries of Pfizer?

    • #48
  19. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill (View Comment):

    Those of us who have been lucky enough to follow Stew Peters over at RedVoiceMedia.com have learned something very troubling and very curious about the supply chain crisis.

    When Biden stated that the fact that goods on container ships could not be off loaded onto the solid ground of Southern Calif ports, and that this was due to the unvaccinated, then most logically thinking people thought this remark was further proof of his being a nutcase.

    But the statement is a true one.

    How so?

    I am forgetting the name of the attorney Peters interviewed who had studied numerous Pfizer and other vax companies’ contractual agreements with national officials across the world. But the information that attorney revealed was terrifying.

    In these contracts, whichever officials represented their country who signed on to the agreements were agreeing to some very strange demands.

    In exchange for the vaccine material, each nation has agreed that unless some huge percentage of the nation’s populace must be vaccinated. (I am forgetting whether it is 95% or 98% or 100%.)

    Some nations have even made agreements that national resources, including oil, minerals, military equipment and actual armies would be forfeited to the vax company if this and other provisions were not met.

    In Brazil, one official signing off on such a document was found to have accepted a “monetary incentive” for doing this. That official is now in jail.

    Our nation is in a world of hurt. Our mom and pop stores, from NY to WA, from Illinois, WI to Calif, have been shuttered. Suicide rates and suicidal ideations are rampant.

    logically thinking people know this must come to an end.

    But in America, due to our lacking the Parliamentary style of government Britain has, the lack of support for these policies means nothing. We are stuck with the Democrats forever. In all Dem-run states, by the time that elections come around this November, the requirements that to even go into a city council meeting, board of supervisor meeting, etc will be negated for any who do not have a vaccine passport. So even attempting to thwart the Dems in these states is a lost cause.

    1 of 2

     

    This tracks with something I heard recently  –  for the life of me I can’t remember where. But there’s a huge amount of Fed $$ that cities and schools have been promised if targeted numbers are met for vaxes and masking. And that’s why school boards and city councils are impervious to pleas from parents and proof that vaxes are unsafe for the young (or at least not worth the risk/benefit), ditto masks.

    • #49
  20. Dominique Prynne Member
    Dominique Prynne
    @DominiquePrynne

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare?  My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness).  We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now).  All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older).  On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines.  Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc.  (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.)  Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.  

    • #50
  21. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    • #51
  22. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    • #52
  23. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long.  Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    • #53
  24. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    • #54
  25. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    Actually, I remember seeing a portable generator at Harbor Freight that can run from gasoline or propane.  Might be a good investment, especially along with some larger propane tanks.  (Like, 10, 15, or 20-gallon, vs the standard 5 gallon BBQ size.)

    • #55
  26. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    I can’t get natural gas in my area and I am far from a road. We have a 1000 gallon propane tank buried in the ground. Everything that can be on it is including a whole home generator and the very important BBQ grill. It cost a lot to get filled but the more you buy the cheaper it is. Relatively. It went up 50% from last year. That really hurts. I probably won’t get a full winter out of it.

    • #56
  27. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    I can’t get natural gas in my area and I am far from a road. We have a 1000 gallon propane tank buried in the ground. Everything that can be on it is including a whole home generator and the very important BBQ grill. It cost a lot to get filled but the more you buy the cheaper it is. Relatively. It went up 50% from last year. That really hurts. I probably won’t get a full winter out of it.

    Sounds like a good idea to keep it topped off, all the time, if possible.

    If you have the electrical capacity, you might want to look into more electric appliances to use while you have power, to save on the propane.  Cuz if the power is out, propane will be all you have.  Electric furnaces are relatively inexpensive.  Or portable high-capacity electric heaters such as used in greenhouses.

    • #57
  28. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    I can’t get natural gas in my area and I am far from a road. We have a 1000 gallon propane tank buried in the ground. Everything that can be on it is including a whole home generator and the very important BBQ grill. It cost a lot to get filled but the more you buy the cheaper it is. Relatively. It went up 50% from last year. That really hurts. I probably won’t get a full winter out of it.

    Sounds like a good idea to keep it topped off, all the time, if possible.

    I have two feet of snow coming so my road wont be passable until spring. Plus there is a minimum and I cant just top off.

    • #58
  29. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    Well, this is for longer than 2 weeks, but what I did was get a propane stove, hot water heater, and propane generator that will run everything in the house (that unfortunately uses a chip module so it’s not EMP proof), and 3 120gal. propane tanks.  It takes 2+ years of cooking to use half a tank.

    I’ve stored up a dozen or more 5 gal. water jugs each of which if filled up and pressed down and sealed, which hold 35# of either rice or different kind of beans.  And bought some tinned meats.  And a big supply of spices, pasta and oil and salt.  It should last me 6 months or a year, maybe two.

    And I’ve got a water catchment system that holds 750 gal., and I only got one because I didn’t have room for two.  And I have a very large pressure cooker and some copper tubing that I can use as a still to distill water if I want.  And I’ve got a septic tank.

    And I bought a few small cheap rechargeable radios with solar cells that will recharge hand held devices like walkie-talkies.  And I store electronics inside a smaller steel garbage can, which is wrapped in cardboard, and then this is placed inside a bigger steel trash can, like a Faraday cage.  I’m supposed to have a concrete safe room, but I can’t find the entrance.

    I still want an outside solar stove and a pick-up with a Cummins diesel but we can’t have everything.

    My biggest concern is people smelling my food cooking from a half mile away.

    • #59
  30. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Dominique Prynne (View Comment):

    Ok…I don’t want to hijack the post (maybe start an offshoot), but what should the typical household be doing to prepare? My husband and I bought two brand new cars in December 2020 (just before the chip shortage startled to ripple into public awareness). We put in a natural gas whole-house generator (which we had to wait for and it wasn’t in before the The Big Texas Freeze, but it’s in now). All of our appliances are serviceable (although some are a bit older). On the business side, we just put in a new server and bought two new fancy copy machines. Plus we are prepared to go two weeks + without any services, groceries etc. (I am working on extending that time, but I don’t have a bunker or anything.) Just wondered if there was something out there that I hadn’t thought of.

    If the natural gas goes out – which it did in some places during the Big Texas Freeze – your whole-house generator will be useless.

    What about propane?

    We have six propane tanks for our BBQ that we keep topped up. I spent a weekend emptying every bathroom and inventorying and sorting medications and first aid supplies. We’ve got an 80 gallon drum of water. I had our one good bicycle tuned up. I sorted through all the camping gear and have a stove, water purifier and tent accessible. (A friend in TX got through the big freeze by staying in a tent in front of her fire). We’re in Cali and weather isn’t much of a worry, but we do go below freezing a few times per winter.

    And I never, ever go below five + pounds of coffee, sugar and flour.

    BBQ tanks wouldn’t run a generator for long. Assuming it was set up for propane to start with, which most aren’t.

    Agreed. We have it so we can still cook on the BBQ,

    I can’t get natural gas in my area and I am far from a road. We have a 1000 gallon propane tank buried in the ground. Everything that can be on it is including a whole home generator and the very important BBQ grill. It cost a lot to get filled but the more you buy the cheaper it is. Relatively. It went up 50% from last year. That really hurts. I probably won’t get a full winter out of it.

    Sounds like a good idea to keep it topped off, all the time, if possible.

    I have two feet of snow coming so my road wont be passable until spring. Plus there is a minimum and I cant just top off.

    For a 1000-gallon tank, 100 gallons might be considered “topping off.”

    • #60
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