Possibly the Dumbest Thing an American Secretary of State Has Ever Said

 

Some may see Nord Stream 2 as leverage that Russia can use against Europe. In fact, it’s leverage for Europe to use against Russia.”US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken. (The Hill)

Right now, Germany is on track to decommission all of its perfectly safe, no-carbon-emission nuclear power plants by the end of the year. That’s why they are helping Russia with Nord Stream. Without Russian gas, Europe will freeze.  “Europe is going to be completely dependent on Russia for energy; this puts Russia right where we want them,” According to the SecState.

“I owe the mafia 50 Large; I have so much leverage over them.” – Same energy.

Who voted for these people? Oh, right.

Published in Foreign Policy
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  1. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Victor Tango Kilo: “I owe the mafia 50 Large; I have *so much* leverage over them.” – Same energy.

    The secretary’s statement is amazingly stupid. Your quote did remind me of the line, “If you owe a bank thousands, you have a problem; owe a bank millions, the bank has a problem”.

    • #1
  2. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    The thing is, there has been so much competition. Think of some of the past Democrat Secretaries of State: Madeleine Albright? Hillary Clinton? John Forbes Kerry? They are an unserious party and their administrative choices advertise the fact.

    • #2
  3. OkieSailor Member
    OkieSailor
    @OkieSailor

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Victor Tango Kilo: “I owe the mafia 50 Large; I have *so much* leverage over them.” – Same energy.

    The secretary’s statement is amazingly stupid. Your quote did remind me of the line, “If you owe a bank thousands, you have a problem; owe a bank millions, the bank has a problem”.

    So I heard many times, but don’t you still have to come up with payments? Wouldn’t you have collateral to lose? I think the saying leaves too much out.

    • #3
  4. OkieSailor Member
    OkieSailor
    @OkieSailor

    Victor Tango Kilo: Right now, Germany is on track to decommission all of its perfectly safe, no-carbon-emission nuclear power plants by the end of the year.

    Is this why the EU has decided to classify nuclear and natural gas as ‘clean’ energy sources? A little late but maybe they are being scared straight by the foolishness going on in Germany.

    • #4
  5. She Member
    She
    @She

    OkieSailor (View Comment):

    Victor Tango Kilo: Right now, Germany is on track to decommission all of its perfectly safe, no-carbon-emission nuclear power plants by the end of the year.

    Is this why the EU has decided to classify nuclear and natural gas as ‘clean’ energy sources? A little late but maybe they are being scared straight by the foolishness going on in Germany.

    Yes, I heard that too.  Hilarious.

    Victor Tango Kilo: Possibly the Dumbest Thing an American Secretary of State Has Ever Said

    Lots of competition there….

    • #5
  6. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    I was very surprised to read in the post that Germany was phasing out its nuclear power plants. This is insanity. I wonder why the industry has not pushed back. They have a very strong record for safety. There’s far more to fear from Russia’s controlling the gas supply and Blinken’s stupidity. Here is the Wikipedia explanation:

    nuclear power phase-out is the discontinuation of usage of nuclear power for energy production. Often initiated because of concerns about nuclear power, phase-outs usually include shutting down nuclear power plants and looking towards fossil fuels and renewable energy. Three nuclear accidents have influenced the discontinuation of nuclear power: the 1979 Three Mile Island partial nuclear meltdown in the United States, the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in the USSR (now Ukraine), and the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan.

    Following Fukushima, Germany has permanently shut down eight of its 17 reactors and pledged to close the rest by the end of 2022. Italy voted overwhelmingly to keep their country non-nuclear. Switzerland and Spain have banned the construction of new reactors. Japan’s prime minister has called for a dramatic reduction in Japan’s reliance on nuclear power. Taiwan’s president did the same. Shinzō Abe, the prime minister of Japan since December 2012, announced a plan to re-start some of the 54 Japanese nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to continue some NPP sites under construction.

    As of 2016, countries including Australia, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Estonia, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Portugal, and Serbia have no nuclear power stations and remain opposed to nuclear power. Belgium, Germany, Spain and Switzerland plan nuclear phase-outs by 2030. Globally, more nuclear power reactors have closed than opened in recent years but overall capacity has increased.

    As of 2022, Italy is the only country that has permanently closed all of its formerly functioning nuclear plants, with Germany phasing out the remaining 3 plants by the end of the year. Lithuania and Kazakhstan have shut down their only nuclear plants, but plan to build new ones to replace them, while Armenia shut down its only nuclear plant but subsequently restarted it. Austria never used its first nuclear plant that was completely built. Due to financial, political and technical reasons Cuba, Libya, North Korea and Poland never completed the construction of their first nuclear plants (although North Korea and Poland plan to). Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Georgia, Ghana, Ireland, Kuwait, Oman, Peru, Venezuela have planned, but not constructed their first nuclear plants. Between 2005 and 2015 the global production of nuclear power declined by 0.7%.

    • #6
  7. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Remember when people said that Dan Quayle sometimes looked like a deer in headlights? Blinken always looks that way to me. 

    • #7
  8. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    MarciN (View Comment):
    “Three nuclear accidents have influenced the discontinuation of nuclear power: the 1979 Three Mile Island partial nuclear meltdown in the United States…”

    I thought that Three Mile Island was a venting of gas, not a nuclear melt-down.  Is this so?

    • #8
  9. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    It would be interesting to see side-by-side photos of Blinken and his predecessor.

    • #9
  10. CACrabtree Coolidge
    CACrabtree
    @CACrabtree

    Arahant (View Comment):

    The thing is, there has been so much competition. Think of some of the past Democrat Secretaries of State: Madeleine Albright? Hillary Clinton? John Forbes Kerry? They are an unserious party and their administrative choices advertise the fact.

    Yeah, Blinken’s quote was pretty bad.  However, for an overall piece of stupidity coming from a U.S. Secretary of State, you’d be hard-pressed to top Teresa’s “trophy” husband:

    https://youtu.be/-kATwwRomMs

    • #10
  11. DonG (CAGW is a hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a hoax)
    @DonG

    Nord Stream2 is about giving Russia leverage over Ukraine.   

    • #11
  12. Captain French Moderator
    Captain French
    @AlFrench

    Flicker (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    “Three nuclear accidents have influenced the discontinuation of nuclear power: the 1979 Three Mile Island partial nuclear meltdown in the United States…”

    I thought that Three Mile Island was a venting of gas, not a nuclear melt-down. Is this so?

    I thought so, too. Let me check Wikipedia. Oh…wait.

    • #12
  13. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Flicker (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    “Three nuclear accidents have influenced the discontinuation of nuclear power: the 1979 Three Mile Island partial nuclear meltdown in the United States…”

    I thought that Three Mile Island was a venting of gas, not a nuclear melt-down. Is this so?

    I thought so too. I think the Wikipedia article is wrong, perhaps intentionally. 

     

    • #13
  14. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    I am looking forward to the Germans freezing in the dark this winter.  They elected their Green Party leaders.

    • #14
  15. Hartmann von Aue Member
    Hartmann von Aue
    @HartmannvonAue

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Victor Tango Kilo: “I owe the mafia 50 Large; I have *so much* leverage over them.” – Same energy.

    The secretary’s statement is amazingly stupid. Your quote did remind me of the line, “If you owe a bank thousands, you have a problem; owe a bank millions, the bank has a problem”.

    I know a guy who went to prison for exactly that second type of problem, brought about by his fraudulent FOREX trading. 

    And for your European political stife of the day: The EU is now classifying gas and nuclear as “green” energy. Certain parties in Berlin are losing what little minds they have over this. 

     

    • #15
  16. Hartmann von Aue Member
    Hartmann von Aue
    @HartmannvonAue

    Ah, someone else mentioned the EU/German strife over the re-classification of nuclear power. I did not notice that in my initial scroll-through. I will post more about this later if time allows. Lately it has not. 

    • #16
  17. Hartmann von Aue Member
    Hartmann von Aue
    @HartmannvonAue

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    I am looking forward to the Germans freezing in the dark this winter. They elected their Green Party leaders.

    That is not likely to happen. Yet. The frustrating thing right now is that the effects of the idiotic “Energiewende” will have to become sufficiently obviously catestrophic before Die Grünen pay a real price at the ballot box.  This is going to happen, but in the mean time, we and our neighbors will have to deal with the short- and medium-term consequences. 

    • #17
  18. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Hartmann von Aue (View Comment):

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    I am looking forward to the Germans freezing in the dark this winter. They elected their Green Party leaders.

    That is not likely to happen. Yet. The frustrating thing right now is that the effects of the idiotic “Energiewende” will have to become sufficiently obviously catestrophic before Die Grünen pay a real price at the ballot box. This is going to happen, but in the mean time, we and our neighbors will have to deal with the short- and medium-term consequences.

    I’m sorry, Hartmann. I bet you are especially uncomfortable with the very high German energy prices. That may be one reason for the high savings rate in Germany. 

    • #18
  19. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    It’s not clear to me that Blinken’s statement is dumb.  This would depend on facts that I do not know.  Maybe some of you can enlighten me.

    What percentage of European energy is going to flow through the new pipeline?  Are there alternative sources?  If Russia decided to shut down the flow of gas to Germany, would the Germans and other Europeans be able to make alternative arrangements?  One possibility would be to fire up some idle coal-burning power plants.

    If I were in charge of energy policy in Europe, I’d want to have a contingency plan to deal with the potential closure of the Russian pipeline, either due to Russian action, or European action, or some accident or sabotage. 

    It does seem unlikely to me that shutting down a single pipeline would cause Europeans to freeze en masse.  It would probably cause a spike in energy prices, but there’s nothing uncommon about that.

    Further, the thing about boycotts is that they work both ways.  Sure, the Russians could cause some financial losses in Europe by shutting down the flow of gas, and the Russians would be hurt themselves by losing the gas revenue.  The Russians are probably more dependent on energy sales to the West than the West is dependent on Russian energy, though I don’t have specific figures to prove this (it is an educated guess based on the fact that the Europeans have other sources of energy available).

    • #19
  20. Steve C. Member
    Steve C.
    @user_531302

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    It’s not clear to me that Blinken’s statement is dumb. This would depend on facts that I do not know. Maybe some of you can enlighten me.

    What percentage of European energy is going to flow through the new pipeline? Are there alternative sources? If Russia decided to shut down the flow of gas to Germany, would the Germans and other Europeans be able to make alternative arrangements? One possibility would be to fire up some idle coal-burning power plants.

    If I were in charge of energy policy in Europe, I’d want to have a contingency plan to deal with the potential closure of the Russian pipeline, either due to Russian action, or European action, or some accident or sabotage.

    It does seem unlikely to me that shutting down a single pipeline would cause Europeans to freeze en masse. It would probably cause a spike in energy prices, but there’s nothing uncommon about that.

    Further, the thing about boycotts is that they work both ways. Sure, the Russians could cause some financial losses in Europe by shutting down the flow of gas, and the Russians would be hurt themselves by losing the gas revenue. The Russians are probably more dependent on energy sales to the West than the West is dependent on Russian energy, though I don’t have specific figures to prove this (it is an educated guess based on the fact that the Europeans have other sources of energy available).

    The Russians won’t have a hard time finding buyers for their nat gas. 

    • #20
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