Screaming for Vengeance Against Soros Stooges

 

In an earlier Ricochet post, “The Waukesha Murderer Is a Product of the Left’s Grievance Industry,” two members commented:

He is a monster, but much worse than him are the prosecutors and judges who are allegedly rational, but fail to keep monsters off of the streets because they think that these monsters are victims rather than victimizers.

We must insist that those people are also monsters. And yes, worse monsters.

Yes. AND. These prosecutors must be subjected to equal or more severe sanction, punishment. Or we, “conservatives,” are just posturing. There are a great many local, state, and federal officials who must be at least civilly tried and stripped of all assets, down to single-wide trailer and $2,000 vehicle level with no savings and all assets hidden in family/friendly shelters clawed back. If this takes a constitutional amendment to overcome the nine self-serving, black-robed masters, so be it. Generate the same level of lawfare, the same pushing of every vaguely colorable legal theory, to harry, to bankrupt, to punish by process and possibly by result. Do it all and always in the name of the children, the children murdered by Soros’ soldiers, the street thugs that are used to keep poor communities down, to keep them from getting ideas about personal, economic, and political independence, agency.

Oh, and George Soros must either be stripped of all assets, including those concealed in various “non-profit” fronts, or deported to a central European country that wants to try him for seeking to drag them back into socialist serfdom. It was one of Soros’ paid-for prosecutors who arranged the $1,000 bail two days before his latest violent crime.

Milwaukee’s District Attorney John Chisholm, one of a number of DAs around the country whose campaigns Mr. Soros has helped bankroll, has worked for the last 15 years to change the city’s approach to incarceration. In 2018, he tweeted how Milwaukee was making a commitment not to keep individuals held on cash bail in jail. When the pandemic hit, Milwaukee’s “woke” Community Justice Council recommended criminals needed to be let out of jail immediately. The city obliged, reducing its jail population by about 40%.

And what kind of predators do Soros stooges set loose on us, especially on the most vulnerable communities of black- and brown-skinned Americans? Here is a summary of Darrell Brooks, Jr. from Heavy, not a right-wing source:

In court during Brooks’ first appearance on November 23, 2021, the district attorney of Waukesha County, Sue Opper, revealed that Brooks also had a family violence arrest in Georgia while he was out on $500 bail in the first Milwaukee County case, which accused him of shooting toward a family member’s car after an argument. In addition, he had an active warrant from Nevada for non-compliance as a registered sex offender for the past five years. Despite those things, when he was accused of trying to run a woman over at a gas station a few days before the parade tragedy, he was released on $1,000 bail.

But, hey, you have to break a few eggs to scrabble up a socialist omelet. Just ask Soros stooge John Chisholm:

“Is there going to be an individual I divert, or I put into treatment program, who’s going to go out and kill somebody?” Chisholm said in a 2007 interview with the Journal Sentinel. “You bet. Guaranteed. It’s guaranteed to happen. It does not invalidate the overall approach.”

Do not accept, do not fall for, the butt-covering paper the Soros’ stooge John Chisholm hung out after he and his paymaster were exposed to Americans’ outrage. Claims that mistakes were made in the bail recommendation and pretending that this was actually inconsistent with Soros stooges’ real policy must be tested against Soros stooges and their street soldiers real record.

Demand real justice. Demand vengeance from every Republican primary candidate. Refuse to support any RepubliCAN’T who trash talks vengeance and ducks hard promises upfront. Refuse to be fooled again, heads must roll even if it isn’t nice. Will we trample out the grapes of wrath into wine before they turn to bitter vinegar?

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  1. MDHahn Coolidge
    MDHahn
    @MDHahn

    This is parody, right? Look, I live in Wisconsin. We’ve dealt with Chisholm’s incompetence and the Dane County DA’s stupidity for over a decade. I would love to see them defeated.

    Vengeance? No. Count me out. I get the anger at what that piece of garbage did in Waukesha. I’m angry. I’m angry at Chisholm and the judge who approved the bail. But the only person who actually killed anyone was the [redacted] who drove the car. Punish him he’s the actual criminal. 

    As for Chisholm, maybe people in Milwaukee will finally wake up about how incompetent he is. I won’t hold my breath.

    As for candidates for office, other than challenging Chisolm and his ilk, what do you propose? What can Congress do? What can state legislatures do? Crimes are prosecuted by county officials in Wisconsin and bail is a case-by-case determination. 

    What happened in Waukesha is awful and the scumbag responsible should be punished. Let’s not throw out all our legal principles because of it. 

    • #1
  2. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    The bad guys never pay

    • #2
  3. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    Clifford proposes, in essence, the attempt to establish a new form of government.  MDHahn proposes retaining and reforming the current form.

    I don’t write to argue for either one. Americans have experienced both. The latest establishment–of absolute rule by a permanent self-appointed, self-propagating faction of Progressivists, carelessly hidden under a thin cloak of old democratic procedure –may not even been over. MDHahn assumes it is not: you can’t reform a republic that no longer exists.

    I mention it only because I think that it is important to recognize the difference.

    Both choices have unpleasant consequences and grave risks.  A country doesn’t get to pick and choose which consequences of its choice it likes, and reject the others.

    We are like two patients with the same illness who each must choose between surgery and no treatment.

    The atheist makes every decision according to his own will, and his faith in only himself.  He believes that either course will lead immediately to his death and thus to the failure of his life.  There is no hope.

    The believer believes that God had a plan for him and for his country before either was born.  He puts his faith in God, and believes that there are no limits to what events will occur, and that if he remains faithful, it will lead to the success of his life, because his will for his life and America’s is the same as God’s will.

    [Added: I see that my metaphor fizzled out before it was finished: at the end I was talking about the real world, not the patients. But you know what I meant.]

    • #3
  4. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Clifford A. Brown:

    Just ask Soros stooge John Chisholm:

    “Is there going to be an individual I divert, or I put into treatment program, who’s going to go out and kill somebody?” Chisholm said in a 2007 interview with the Journal Sentinel. “You bet. Guaranteed. It’s guaranteed to happen. It does not invalidate the overall approach.”

    Then what the heck does invalidate the overall approach?  How many people does a whacko have to kill until you realize you screwed up?

    • #4
  5. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MDHahn (View Comment):
    This is parody, right? Look, I live in Wisconsin. We’ve dealt with Chisholm’s incompetence and the Dane County DA’s stupidity for over a decade. I would love to see them defeated.

    How badly?

    In the wake of Chisholm’s John Doe raids, why was he even allowed to remain a free man? Nobody suffered any punishment in that criminal action except for the Walker donors who were awakened in the early hours of the morning by law enforcement breaking into their homes, illegally confiscating their computers, going through their trash, and frightening the hell out of their children.

    Why did Chisholm suffer no consequences?

     

    • #5
  6. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The bad guys never pay

    Indeed. Partly because the good guys never make them pay.

    • #6
  7. MDHahn Coolidge
    MDHahn
    @MDHahn

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    MDHahn (View Comment):
    This is parody, right? Look, I live in Wisconsin. We’ve dealt with Chisholm’s incompetence and the Dane County DA’s stupidity for over a decade. I would love to see them defeated.

    How badly?

    In the wake of Chisholm’s John Doe raids, why was he even allowed to remain a free man? Nobody suffered any punishment in that criminal action except for the Walker donors who were awakened in the early hours of the morning by law enforcement breaking into their homes, illegally confiscating their computers, going through their trash, and frightening the hell out of their children.

    Why did Chisholm suffer no consequences?

    He’s not in jail because he did not break any laws in how the John Doe raids were carried out. The warrants and the theory of the crimes were unconstitutional and that’s why the Wisconsin Supreme Court shut down the John Doe investigation. Unfortunately, the methods and timing of the raids have been used and approved of for decades. We don’t throw police and prosecutors in prison for those raids. Maybe we should, but that’s just not the law.

    We both know that DAs are elected by each county. I don’t live in Milwaukee County and I can’t vote against him. The problem is that Milwaukee voters don’t think he’s bad. They think he stood up to the evil Walker. To change that would require massive changes to the structure of our Courts and criminal justice systems. Removing a DA outside of an election should be difficult because you don’t want that to be a scalp-hunting exercise.

    • #7
  8. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    MDHahn (View Comment):
    Removing a DA outside of an election should be difficult because you don’t want that to be a scalp-hunting exercise.

    I really don’t see the problem with that. But then this subject header does include the word “vengeance.”

     

    • #8
  9. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    I want to see the psychiatric evaluation that was done on this guy. Including his prescriptions over the last five years. 

    I don’t understand why psychiatrists who advise courts on this type of patient are never held to account for their bad judgments. In the Aurora theater case, the shooter was a patient of the university’s psychiatrist, and he had sent her a detailed description–in other words, she had his plan in writing in her possession–of his planned attack. This was a clear case of being “a danger to himself or others.” She has never been prosecuted or stripped of her psychiatrist’s credentials. 

    Most paranoid schizophrenics are not dangerous to others. But a handful are, and the psychiatrists are doing a terrible job sorting them out. 

     

    • #9
  10. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The bad guys never pay

    Indeed. Partly because the good guys never make them pay.

    The cost of enforcement is high. But the cost of doing without it continues to rise. Things stay the same until they don’t.

    • #10
  11. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Barfly (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The bad guys never pay

    Indeed. Partly because the good guys never make them pay.

    The cost of enforcement is high. But the cost of doing without it continues to rise. Things stay the same until they don’t.

    Yes. By the way, I received a package from Barfly a couple of days ago. It’s a minor part for mounting my bicycle computer.

    • #11
  12. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Barfly (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The bad guys never pay

    Indeed. Partly because the good guys never make them pay.

    The cost of enforcement is high. But the cost of doing without it continues to rise. Things stay the same until they don’t.

    Yes. By the way, I received a package from Barfly a couple of days ago. It’s a minor part for mounting my bicycle computer.

    Eh?

    L-I-B. I had no idea.

    • #12
  13. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    MDHahn (View Comment):

    This is parody, right? Look, I live in Wisconsin. We’ve dealt with Chisholm’s incompetence and the Dane County DA’s stupidity for over a decade. I would love to see them defeated.

    Vengeance? No. Count me out. I get the anger at what that piece of garbage did in Waukesha. I’m angry. I’m angry at Chisholm and the judge who approved the bail. But the only person who actually killed anyone was the [redacted] who drove the car. Punish him he’s the actual criminal.

    As for Chisholm, maybe people in Milwaukee will finally wake up about how incompetent he is. I won’t hold my breath.

    As for candidates for office, other than challenging Chisolm and his ilk, what do you propose? What can Congress do? What can state legislatures do? Crimes are prosecuted by county officials in Wisconsin and bail is a case-by-case determination.

    What happened in Waukesha is awful and the scumbag responsible should be punished. Let’s not throw out all our legal principles because of it.

    If we had been more motivated against corruption years before this, we would not be here now. So I have little use for pearl clutchers so late in the game. The world our forebears built is hanging of by a tenuous thread. I do not think our republic was fragile. It has been made fragile by decades of decadence and antipathy chipping at its foundations. If my kids are to be left in a world with freedom and a functioning society, things need to change.

    • #13
  14. MDHahn Coolidge
    MDHahn
    @MDHahn

    Stina (View Comment):

    MDHahn (View Comment):

    This is parody, right? Look, I live in Wisconsin. We’ve dealt with Chisholm’s incompetence and the Dane County DA’s stupidity for over a decade. I would love to see them defeated.

    Vengeance? No. Count me out. I get the anger at what that piece of garbage did in Waukesha. I’m angry. I’m angry at Chisholm and the judge who approved the bail. But the only person who actually killed anyone was the [redacted] who drove the car. Punish him he’s the actual criminal.

    As for Chisholm, maybe people in Milwaukee will finally wake up about how incompetent he is. I won’t hold my breath.

    As for candidates for office, other than challenging Chisolm and his ilk, what do you propose? What can Congress do? What can state legislatures do? Crimes are prosecuted by county officials in Wisconsin and bail is a case-by-case determination.

    What happened in Waukesha is awful and the scumbag responsible should be punished. Let’s not throw out all our legal principles because of it.

    If we had been more motivated against corruption years before this, we would not be here now. So I have little use for pearl clutchers so late in the game. The world our forebears built is hanging of by a tenuous thread. I do not think our republic was fragile. It has been made fragile by decades of decadence and antipathy chipping at its foundations. If my kids are to be left in a world with freedom and a functioning society, things need to change.

    What pearl clutching? I want Chisholm gone and I oppose catch and release policies for repeat offenders. But I won’t embrace vengeance. We don’t preserve our system and our freedom by abandoning those principles. 

    I have young children. I want them to have the blessings and freedom we have all inherited, too. Do things need to change? Absolutely. We do that by reinforcing the principles that made our country great in the first place.

    • #14
  15. Unsk Member
    Unsk
    @Unsk

    I’d advocate a return to the Rule of Law and a strict interpretation  of the Constitution. 

    George Soros et al has financed the election of DA’s and election officials all around the country who warp the law to their destructive and treasonous interests.  There needs to be punishment of those elected and appointed government officials who use the law illegally to further the interests of the Left’s  overthrow of our government.

    Too often the Legal squishes among us cite the “stare decisis” cop out as a reason  for this  travesty can continue.  They have used Stare Decisis through a series of Constitutional end runs to forgive the illegal acts of public officials and justify them as somehow appropriate. Stare Decisis is essentially the rule of Precedent  which the Left on the Court have used to justify their unconstitutional rulings, building incrementally on one bad ruling after another to nibble away at  our rights .  

      The Leftards on the Supreme Court say that  Stare Decisis “promotes the evenhanded, predictable, and consistent development of legal principles, fosters reliance on judicial decisions, and contributes to the actual and perceived integrity of the judicial process.” , but that is utter nonsense. What Stare Decisis does is that it allows through the accumulation of leftist rulings the rewriting of the Constitution into a new document that justifies  all sorts of Police State and other illegal actions. It essentially makes Law and a law that is diametrically opposes the Constitution and our rights. That is how    we got to where we are today with Stalinist Joe Biden and his Commie-tard   compatriots. 

     

    • #15
  16. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Related: Ax-Wielding Antifa Member Attacks GOP Senator’s Office, Dems Give Him Money, FBI Returns Ax

    Far-left miscreant Thomas Alexander Starks, 31, of Lisbon, North Dakota, pleaded guilty to destruction of government property last April. Starks brought an ax to Sen. John Hoeven’s office in Fargo on December 21, 2020, and smashed  an intercom and glass door. The attack was captured on video.

    Federal guidelines suggested Starks should spend 10–16 months in the hoosegow, but because he is a protected member of Antifa, he was sentenced to mere probation and ordered to pay $2,784 in restitution.

    Keep in mind that there are people still in solitary confinement for taking non-violent selfies in the Capitol on January 6.

    Even better, the FBI returned the ax he used in the attack. Starks is bragging about it on Facebook, where he goes by the name “Paul Dunyan,” a reference to the axman Paul Bunyan.

    . . .

    After his arrest, Starks set up a GoFundMe (where he claimed innocence) and begged for financial help to hire a lawyer. He also claims he would “never pointlessly put his family’s well-being in jeopardy with reckless vandalism.” Even though he did.

    . . .

    Three North Dakota Democrats threw the fascist some dough. Democrat Party Executive Committee Representative Ellie Shockley donated $100, Democratic-Non Partisan League (NPL) Chairwoman Kylie Oversen also gave $100, and Ellen Chaffee, the Democrat candidate for lt. governor in 2012, gave $500.

     

    • #16
  17. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Barfly (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Barfly (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The bad guys never pay

    Indeed. Partly because the good guys never make them pay.

    The cost of enforcement is high. But the cost of doing without it continues to rise. Things stay the same until they don’t.

    Yes. By the way, I received a package from Barfly a couple of days ago. It’s a minor part for mounting my bicycle computer.

    Eh?

    L-I-B. I had no idea.

    M-R Ducks!

    You didn’t see the credit card charge?

    • #17
  18. Old Bathos Moderator
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    Crafting a liability claim is hard because (a) prosecutors have absolute discretion and (b) donating to the campaign of a public official who turns out to be a disaster would, for example, make everyone who donated to the Biden campaign similarly liable.

    The theory of Team Soros is that (a) crime is a consequence of poverty (b) poverty is a consequence of something systemically bad and (c) incarcerating criminals removes the pressure to undo whatever the systemic badness is.  Therefore, we will get social justice if there is nobody in jail and the only way to eliminate crime is to undo and remove the badness.  The theft, mayhem, and murder should be thought of as merely a proportional incentive for society to install justice–and if there is a lot of crime, then society deserves it anyway because it must be due to the systemic badness.

    It is a coherent philosophy even if blindingly stupid.  

    Part of that program is to fiercely prosecute the non-poor, non-victim class from taking matters into their own hands.  That kind of action interferes with the incentive structure and also threatens to waken the sleeping beast that is deeply racist Middle America.  That fear is deeply embedded in the lefty mindset. Four thousand murders in NYC in 1984 but the most intense manhunt and top-level prosecution was for the nebbish Bernie Goetz who merely wounded but did not kill the four young scholars who, in keeping with the highest traditions of the NYC subway system, tried to rob him.

    There needs to be a way to inflict pain on perpetrators of this stupidity.  I just don’t know what that would be.  Could victims in Maryland have sued Mike Dukakis and Massachusetts for letting Willie Horton out?   I don’t see how.  And that is the essence of the problem.  Voters in Milwaukee County can be suicidal morons but the consequences of their stupidity don’t stop at the county line. Is there some legislative fix?  A well-defined basis for personal liability?  I dunno.

    • #18
  19. Old Bathos Moderator
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    MarciN (View Comment):

    I want to see the psychiatric evaluation that was done on this guy. Including his prescriptions over the last five years.

    I don’t understand why psychiatrists who advise courts on this type of patient are never held to account for their bad judgments. In the Aurora theater case, the shooter was a patient of the university’s psychiatrist, and he had sent her a detailed description–in other words, she had his plan in writing in her possession–of his planned attack. This was a clear case of being “a danger to himself or others.” She has never been prosecuted or stripped of her psychiatrist’s credentials.

    Most paranoid schizophrenics are not dangerous to others. But a handful are, and the psychiatrists are doing a terrible job sorting them out.

     

    Shrinks are pretty useless but the system has to have that input.  I think it could be simpler to use a standardized approach for shrink experts:

    • #19
  20. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    Flicker (View Comment):
    M-R Ducks!

    R naught.

    • #20
  21. Zafar Member
    Zafar
    @Zafar

    If DAs are elected, what’s the attraction of candidates whose position is that diverting non-violent offenders from prison is a benefit?  Also, clearly this person was a violent offender – so what was the rationale?

    • #21
  22. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    Zafar (View Comment):

    If DAs are elected, what’s the attraction of candidates whose position is that diverting non-violent offenders from prison is a benefit? Also, clearly this person was a violent offender – so what was the rationale?

    It’s people not paying attention to local election – blindly vote R or D

    • #22
  23. Headedwest Coolidge
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    MDHahn (View Comment):
    Removing a DA outside of an election should be difficult because you don’t want that to be a scalp-hunting exercise.

    I think scalp hunting is entirely appropriate for [readacted] like Chisholm. 

    • #23
  24. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    I think we all understand where the author of this thread is coming from.  I am the guy who got quoted at the start of the post. Believe me I sympathize totally with the desire to be rid of these leftist scheisters. However, they were all legally elected. I hate George Soros, but he has every right, as does everyone in this country, to spend his money anyway he wants to. Ultimately, you get the government you deserve. If people are stupid enough to vote for this crud, then the cities in which they live will have to deal with the consequences of that choice.  There is a great line from Walace Stegner’s book, Angle of Repose:

    “I know of no way of discounting the doctrine that when you take something you want, and damn the consequences, you had better be ready for whatever consequences ensue.”

    Voters in many large cities are electing these guys as a form of virtue signaling  thinking that there is not going to be anything that comes back on them. There are six dead people and more than 40 injured people in Waukesha where they elected a prosecutor who did not in anyway hide his agenda. When these people wake up and realize that there is a direct link between the choices they make in the voting booth and criminals being turned loose on their streets, perhaps they will take the process of elections more seriously. They may even try to impeach these prosecutors and remove them before they come up for reelection. But it isn’t up to us. It is up to them to act responsibly about the city they live in.

    • #24
  25. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    GlennAmurgis (View Comment):

    Zafar (View Comment):

    If DAs are elected, what’s the attraction of candidates whose position is that diverting non-violent offenders from prison is a benefit? Also, clearly this person was a violent offender – so what was the rationale?

    It’s people not paying attention to local election – blindly vote R or D

    There is a massive campaign financing, so advertising and getting out the vote, advantage to doing as Soros wants. That is why I keep using his name throughout the post. This is not about blindly voting, it is about massively disproportional spending on behalf of a candidate. 

    • #25
  26. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Old Bathos (View Comment):
    There needs to be a way to inflict pain on perpetrators of this stupidity.  I just don’t know what that would be.  Could victims in Maryland have sued Mike Dukakis and Massachusetts for letting Willie Horton out?   I don’t see how.  And that is the essence of the problem.  Voters in Milwaukee County can be suicidal morons but the consequences of their stupidity don’t stop at the county line. Is there some legislative fix?  A well-defined basis for personal liability?  I dunno.

    Neither do I, but this must be vigorously explored/ pursued along multiple lines of effort. 

    • #26
  27. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):

    I think we all understand where the author of this thread is coming from. I am the guy who got quoted at the start of the post. Believe me I sympathize totally with the desire to be rid of these leftist scheisters. However, they were all legally elected. I hate George Soros, but he has every right, as does everyone in this country, to spend his money anyway he wants to. Ultimately, you get the government you deserve. If people are stupid enough to vote for this crud, then the cities in which they live will have to deal with the consequences of that choice. There is a great line from Walace Stegner’s book, Angle of Repose:

    “I know of no way of discounting the doctrine that when you take something you want, and damn the consequences, you had better be ready for whatever consequences ensue.”

    Voters in many large cities are electing these guys as a form of virtue signaling thinking that there is not going to be anything that comes back on them. There are six dead people and more than 40 injured people in Waukesha where they elected a prosecutor who did not in anyway hide his agenda. When these people wake up and realize that there is a direct link between the choices they make in the voting booth and criminals being turned loose on their streets, perhaps they will take the process of elections more seriously. They may even try to impeach these prosecutors and remove them before they come up for reelection. But it isn’t up to us. It is up to them to act responsibly about the city they live in.

    However, the timing of local elections predominantly avoids the highest turn out dates of the presidential and mid-term federal elections. This predictably generates lower turn-out. With much lower total attention and participation, a handful of votes can make the difference. Under those conditions, the massive advantage of Soros funding can overwhelm what would be the choice of the local citizens, were their media market not so slanted by outside money. Certainly, richer urban (mostly) whites are virtue signaling while expecting to be shielded from the negative consequences.

    The Milwaukee County District Attorney was reelected on the 2020 presidential general election date, however, he ran unopposed. 

    The Republican Party could not be bothered to put up and support a candidate, and John Chisholm did not even have a Democrat primary challenger.

    So, these voters could make no real choice. It is not their fault.

    • #27
  28. DrewInWisconsin, Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):
    There are six dead people and more than 40 injured people in Waukesha where they elected a prosecutor who did not in anyway hide his agenda. When these people wake up and realize that there is a direct link between the choices they make in the voting booth and criminals being turned loose on their streets, perhaps they will take the process of elections more seriously. They may even try to impeach these prosecutors and remove them before they come up for reelection. But it isn’t up to us. It is up to them to act responsibly about the city they live in.

    Waukesha isn’t in Milwaukee County. Chisholm is not their DA. His actions harmed people who did not vote him into office and cannot vote him out of office.

    So now what do we do?

    • #28
  29. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    DrewInWisconsin, Oaf (View Comment):

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):
    There are six dead people and more than 40 injured people in Waukesha where they elected a prosecutor who did not in anyway hide his agenda. When these people wake up and realize that there is a direct link between the choices they make in the voting booth and criminals being turned loose on their streets, perhaps they will take the process of elections more seriously. They may even try to impeach these prosecutors and remove them before they come up for reelection. But it isn’t up to us. It is up to them to act responsibly about the city they live in.

    Waukesha isn’t in Milwaukee County. Chisholm is not their DA. His actions harmed people who did not vote him into office and cannot vote him out of office.

    So now what do we do?

    No good answers.  Work locally to identify and elect DAs and politicians that fall at least generally into a camp other than a Soros-esque camp, ideologically, and cross your fingers.

    That many of those elections happen unopposed or people just pull the R or D lever (which I do, because I don’t research the candidates and if it’s a choice between R and D I pull the R lever).  It’s really the stuff that needs doing well before the candidate is put on the ballot.  It’s candidate identification.  

    We have no pipeline, nothing funded, nothing that would encourage a broader consistent effort.  Not down at that level of governance.

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  30. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    I live in a state heavily dominated by the left. Both of our senators are worthless, and our most recently elected representative is a leftist doctor who replaced a really good ex-sheriff who held that role until he retired. I can only hope we get a better candidate in the next election for that post. We have one of the worst governors in the country. For us, the problem is that the vast majority of voters in the state on in the big cities that border Puget Sound. They are getting what they deserve from the people they have elected, and there might be a wakeup call coming for them as places like Seattle, the once gorgeous Emerald City, turn into homeless encampments and Antifa hangouts. I don’t vote in Seattle. Where I live Seattle’s problems don’t intrude, but I hate to see it turned into a rat hole. It is up to the people there to change what is happening. I hope they do, and soon,

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