The Great Ricochet Holiday Cooking Show and Tell, 2021 Edition

 

Ladies and Gentlemen (and the rest of you too, of course), start your engines!

I’ve handicapped myself (because whatever privilege the English enjoy, cooking isn’t it, as many of you have kindly reminded me over the years), and I’ve given myself a head start. Because I need one. So far, I’m three Christmas puddings (should do this Christmas and the next two) and a fruitcake in.

The pudds are this recipe. It’s not one I’ve tried before, but I thought I’d give it a whirl.

And the cake is Mary Berry’s Fruitcake. My batter must have been a little more liquid than it should have been (probably overly large eggs — thanks, girls!)

because some of the almonds that were supposed to decorate the top have sunk in. The house (after a 4.5-hour bake) smells glorious, though. Now, to let it cool and sprinkle on even more booze. (My only adaptations to the original were to use bourbon instead of brandy and to “invent” my own mixed spice out of what I had on the shelves. Note to self: Is “mixed spice,” as an end product, a peculiarly British thing? It’s in the puddings too.)

Let’s not limit this thread just to baking. I’ve still got a couple of pounds of bangers (specially made for me by the local butcher), and I’ll be indulging at some point in Toad in the Hole With Onion Gravy. Sublime. (Get English bangers, if you possibly can; it’s just not the same with Bob Evans or Jimmy Dean.)

Yesterday, when I was at the butcher’s (where I am known far and wide as “Banger Woman,” for reasons that might not be obvious to those who don’t cherish a secret regard for English “hoht kwizeene,” but which — in that context — make eminent sense), they had calves’ liver on offer. I snaffled a couple of packages. The lovely (young) man gave them to me for free, merely because I was one of the very few takers! (My sense of self and of the ridiculous is AJ Squared Away, and I’m certain that’s all there was to it. LOL.) I shall try (when all my company has left me, and I am on my own) my mother’s recipe for liver and onions and revel in a childhood delight. I will report back after the fact. Need to make sure I can get it right first. In the meantime, drool away — there’s lots of bacon involved!

And in about 90 minutes, an enormous pot roast should be done and ready for consumption. I’ll test it for supper tonight, to make sure it’s not poisonous. While I greatly enjoy cooking the holiday meal (the centerpiece of which, for our small celebration this year, will be a turkey breast with cranberry stuffing from the aforementioned local farm butcher), I really don’t like struggling to find things to eat when company shows up unexpectedly, or when those of us who are here want to veg out (see what I did there) and pick at food. So I like to have plenty on hand.

Boy, howdy.

Between Thanksgiving and Christmas, I’ll ponder some of our family culinary traditions in all directions: British, Polish, French, German, Scottish, and — newly added — Indian (East). Could anything possibly be more delightful?

You should expect, at some point, that my late mother-in-law’s holly cookies will make an appearance:

(If you’re making these more than a day or so in advance, store them in an airtight tin. Also, understand that you are using more green food coloring than you imagine is possible. Your fingers will be green. Your bowls and utensils will be green. And if you cheat and try one, it will be like that ink the feds use to identify bank criminals. Your teeth will be green. Your tongue will be green. Make a wrong move, and your clothes will be green. The fact that you cheated will be undeniable. Just so you know.)

Yeah, most of the time, I’m by myself (so I think, “My God, what am I going to do with all this food????”). But I’ll have company for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s, and something tells me that this year’s iteration of all of those is going to be the best ever! Perhaps I’ll not even have to wait till the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve for a Hollywood handsome or even just a rather ordinary-looking stranger to first-foot into my house and bring me luck! (Experience over several decades has informed me it’s probably best not to count on such a thing, anyway.)

And even if I spend the holidays as an old hag, alone here with my dogs, cats, sheep, bunnies, and chickens, dreaming of days gone by or what might have been 🤯, I’ll be content. And I know I’ll have enough fruitcake to survive any privations and supply-chain issues that come my way. Laugh if you dare. Pretty sure I’ll have the last one.

What are you cooking/baking for the holidays this year? And please, will you share your stories and your favorite recipes?

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  1. Randy Webster Member
    Randy Webster
    @RandyWebster

    I’ve made two souffle’s in my life, one that fell, and one that didn’t.  Both were to impress girlfriends about 50 years ago.

    • #1
  2. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    The only thing I make for dinner is reservations. But I did used to cook when my daughter was little. Sometimes when I was on a deadline it might be McDonald’s but hey. Once when she was in kindergarten, the teacher assigned them to write down their favorite thing their mom makes and to write what they thought the recipe was. Thank God she wrote of my zucchini with tomatoes instead of poptarts. Then the teacher put them all together in a recipe book and we each got one. It was hilarious. One boy wrote “You mix it all together and put it in the cooker for five hours at 600 degrees.”  hahahaha!!

    • #2
  3. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    Just the usual:

    Turkey with Grandma C’s Oklahoma cornbread stuffing and gravy. Ham. Sweet potato casserole (no marshmallows (ick) — pecan crust). Bob Evan’s mashed potatoes (I can’t make them any better). Cranberry salad (jello mold — my mom’s recipe). Jalapeno deviled eggs (also Grandma C’s recipe). Roasted carrots and onions. Green beans. And apple streusel pie for dessert, because, ‘merica (with a little German heritage thrown in).  

    Recipes available upon request. 

    Mr. C and I laughed at this:

    I’m too tired to be Jurassic Park T-rex, though. 

    • #3
  4. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    I’m contributing lighter fare to the feasts. Of course, I’ll bring along my cranberry orange marmalade, which goes with about all the season’s meats and breads. Someone else is doing the green bean casserole, from scratch, so there will be a green vegetable (link to a family tale). I will not be seeking to approximate one of my father’s absolutely awesome (he hates that word’s overuse but here appropriate) apple pies. I might take a stab at lebkuchen, but that is a real commitment, even if it is part of the Browns’ holiday tradition.

    Turning to left-overs and surplus supplies, I’ve already run a batch of turkey chili, of a sort, in the 7 quart slow cooker. I’m eating some this week and already portioned out and froze the rest for later. I used an extra 3 pound turkey breast (boneless, skinless, pre-packaged). Add a pound of beans, pound plus of carrots, yellow onion, and spices to taste, cook low and slow. Add tomatoes and a small tube of tomato paste at the end. Stir. Enjoy.

    • #4
  5. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    Turning to left-overs and surplus supplies,    ….  

    • #5
  6. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Bob Evan’s mashed potatoes (I can’t make them any better).

    I and my little family are addicted to these. :-) :-)  My daughter lived on them during the pandemic in Manhattan. :-) My husband and I love them.

    Genetics are funny thing. I wrote Carrie a note to tell her about this really easy way to have mashed potatoes, and she replied right away, “I know, Mom. We love them!” We laughed. Far apart and my little family found the same thing in the middle of the millions of products in the grocery store. :-)

     

    • #6
  7. Hang On Member
    Hang On
    @HangOn

    I’ve never really liked turkey so I do a roast beef. Simple but increasingly expensive. (Thank you Brandon. ) Peel onions and chop mushrooms.  Rub the beef with salt, pepper and garlic. Stick it in the oven at 275 for 4 or 5 hours with a thermometer roasting mushrooms and onions in the juices. That’s my contribution. 

    • #7
  8. Captain French Moderator
    Captain French
    @AlFrench

    This year my son is hosting thanksgiving dinner for the extended family. My required contribution is the wine. But inspired by @arahant I am going to make a persimmon pudding. 

    • #8
  9. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    She: You should expect, at some point, that my late mother-in-law’s holly cookies will make an appearance:

    These are my favorite holiday cookies and they are now made my me annually since I set up my own household. My grandmother made them.

    The creation of wilton’s saturated gel food colorings has made it easier to get the green without the entire tube of coloring.

    Very messy, but I like making them with my kids who supply the red hots.

    • #9
  10. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    MarciN (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Bob Evan’s mashed potatoes (I can’t make them any better).

    I and my little family are addicted to these. :-) :-) My daughter lived on them during the pandemic in Manhattan. :-) My husband and I love them.

    Genetics are funny thing. I wrote Carrie a note to tell her about this really easy way to have mashed potatoes, and she replied right away, “I know, Mom. We love them!” We laughed. Far apart and my little family found the same thing in the middle of the millions of products in the grocery store. :-)

    So true. Once you’ve had Bob Evan’s mashed, you can never go back. I get into a veritable panic if I can’t find them at the grocery close to the holidays. I’ve been known to run to the prepared foods refrigerator case from the front of the store, just to make sure I get mine!

    We’re so spoiled.

    • #10
  11. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    This will be the third year that it’s just Ray and me (I was kicked out of my family due to the sentiments expressed on my personal blog, but never at family gatherings).  The past two years, I made a prime rib roast.  This year, I saw a stuffed turkey-breast roast in one of the supermarket sale flyers we get every week, and it sounded so good I had Ray bring one home.  So I’ll be cooking that-easy!  Ray will make his famous lighter-than-air Yukon Gold mashed potatoes (whole milk and butter).  I’ll be stir-frying some broccoli with onions and some red peppers.  And Ray brought home a nice bottle of Pepper Bridge Washington State Merlot to drink with dinner.  For the weekend, I made simple onion dip for us to have with our chips while cooking and watching TV.  And, since it’s the 20th anniversary of the first Harry Potter movie, we’ll be watching that, and probably the second one too.

    • #11
  12. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    Hang On (View Comment):

    I’ve never really liked turkey so I do a roast beef. Simple but increasingly expensive. (Thank you Brandon. ) Peel onions and chop mushrooms. Rub the beef with salt, pepper and garlic. Stick it in the oven at 275 for 4 or 5 hours with a thermometer roasting mushrooms and onions in the juices. That’s my contribution.

    Need more info. What kind of roast? Weight? Is this a pot roast type of roast?

    • #12
  13. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    RightAngles (View Comment):
    Once when she was in kindergarten, the teacher assigned them to write down their favorite thing their mom makes and to write what they thought the recipe was. Thank God she wrote of my zucchini with tomatoes instead of poptarts.

    LOL.  I suffered a bit from the opposite effect: Dad was a butcher’s son, and he had a lifelong passion for some of the more offal sorts of delicacies–and of course he had the recipes and the ability to prove it.  Which is why I generally avoided the “what are you most likely to find in your refrigerator?” types of questions, as I’d have been in danger of writing about the pickled tongue, or the pigs’ feet, or the tripe…. (the “boar’s head” at the top of this post is one of Dad’s efforts, done for a long-ago Hogmanay celebration with a Scottish friend.)

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Sweet potato casserole (no marshmallows (ick) — pecan crust).

    Yes.  I am all about both these sentiments.  I add coconut oil (you have to use the organic extra-virgin–which smells of coconut; many of them don’t) to mine.)

     Jalapeno deviled eggs (also Grandma C’s recipe).

    These sound delightful.  Care to share?  Or if it’s a family secret, at least offer a few pointers?

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):
    Turning to left-overs and surplus supplies,

    Oh, hahaha.  I first read this as “left-overs and sulfurous supplies.”  Which, let’s be honest, could be a fair description of some of my refrigerated left-overs at some point….

    I’ve already run a batch of turkey chili, of a sort, in the 7 quart slow cooker. I’m eating some this week and already portioned out and froze the rest for later. I used an extra 3 pound turkey breast (boneless, skinless, pre-packaged). Add a pound of beans…

    Thanks.  This sounds great.

    Hang On (View Comment):
    I’ve never really liked turkey so I do a roast beef. Simple but increasingly expensive. (Thank you Brandon. ) Peel onions and chop mushrooms.  Rub the beef with salt, pepper and garlic. Stick it in the oven at 275 for 4 or 5 hours with a thermometer roasting mushrooms and onions in the juices. That’s my contribution. 

    And a good one it is!  To my mind, the most important thing here is the mushrooms.  Not only do they add “mushrooms,” (always a good idea) but they contribute a really good flavor to the juices.  Thanks!

    Stina (View Comment):

    She: You should expect, at some point, that my late mother-in-law’s holly cookies will make an appearance:

    These are my favorite holiday cookies and they are now made my me annually since I set up my own household. My grandmother made them.

    The creation of wilton’s saturated gel food colorings has made it easier to get the green without the entire tube of coloring.

    Oh, thanks.  I will try the gel color.  Lord, they are messy.

     

    • #13
  14. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):
    This will be the third year that it’s just Ray and me (I was kicked out of my family due to the sentiments expressed on my personal blog, but never at family gatherings).  The past two years, I made a prime rib roast.  This year, I saw a stuffed turkey-breast roast in one of the supermarket sale flyers we get every week, and it sounded so good I had Ray bring one home.  So I’ll be cooking that-easy!  Ray will make his famous lighter-than-air Yukon Gold mashed potatoes (whole milk and butter).  I’ll be stir-frying some broccoli with onions and some red peppers.  And Ray brought home a nice bottle of Pepper Bridge Washington State Merlot….

    Sounds delicious.  I’m trying the “stuffed turkey breast” thing this year myself.  Happy Thanksgiving to you both!

     

    • #14
  15. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    A few years ago, a friend who was staying with us–and who was quite a good cook–suggested cooking the turkey upside-down.  I have no idea if this was a family tradition, or just a spontaneous revelation, but I’ve since followed the advice.  IMHO, it works rather well, as the juices from the fattier (darker) parts drip down to the less so (breast), rendering (see what I did there) the bird even more moist and tasty.  Just a thought.  If you’re worried about appearances (I’m not, as must be clear by now) you can turn it before serving, and let the “broil” setting brown the top of the bird, but IMHO that’s not necessary.  Once it’s carved, it assumes something of an all cats are grey in the dark aspect, and no-one will know.

    • #15
  16. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    She (View Comment):

    A few years ago, a friend who was staying with us–and who was quite a good cook–suggested cooking the turkey upside-down. I have no idea if this was a family tradition, or just a spontaneous revelation, but I’ve since followed the advice. IMHO, it works rather well, as the juices from the fattier (darker) parts drip down to the less so (breast), rendering (see what I did there) the bird even more moist and tasty. Just a thought. If you’re worried about appearances (I’m not, as must be clear by now) you can turn it before serving, and let the “broil” setting brown the top of the bird, but IMHO that’s not necessary. Once it’s carved, it assumes something of an all cats are grey in the dark aspect, and no-one will know.

    Yes, this is the technique recommended by the America’s Test Kitchen recipe I use. But, you turn it over for the last hour or so to get the crispy browned skin. Prep is important, too, since you brine the bird for up to 6 hours and then leave it uncovered in the fridge to dry out the skin for up to 24 hours. This is what I mean by being too tiiired. I started cooking on Monday. 

     

    • #16
  17. 9thDistrictNeighbor Member
    9thDistrictNeighbor
    @9thDistrictNeighbor

    One year I brought home a copy of the November issue of Bon Appétit magazine–1986, when there were far more recipes than pictures. Here is the index of recipes:

    Note at the top the first recipe, Cranberry Puree.  It is truly outstanding (for reasons you will discover soon enough).  We are blessed to be spending Thanksgiving at home with our son for the first time in three years.  We will serve the Cranberry puree with the bird.

    Cranberry Puree

    2 pounds cranberries

    4 cups sugar

    3/4 cup Marsala

    1/2 cup Grand Marnier

    1/4 bitters (I use Angostura.)

    Cook cranberries and sugar in heavy medium saucepan over medium hear until cranberries are very soft, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.  Puree mixture in blender with half  of Marsala.  Strain into medium bowl, pressing to extract as much fruit as possible.  Whisk in remaining Marsala, Grand Marnier and bitters.  Cover and refrigerate overnight.  (Can be prepared 5 days ahead.)  Serve well chilled.

    I make half the recipe and it is about one quart.  I also use Cointreau instead of Grand Marnier, and an immersion blender right in the pot to puree everything.  Since the immersion blender pulverizes everything quite thoroughly, I don’t strain.  Bonus, less to clean up.

    I don’t make this if children are going to eat, but given the amount most people would eat I don’t think you could get tipsy from it.  I also wouldn’t make it if I knew someone had issues with adult beverages.  My husband does not like Cranberry sauce, but he loves this.

    • #17
  18. KCVolunteer Lincoln
    KCVolunteer
    @KCVolunteer

    She (View Comment):

    LOL. I suffered a bit from the opposite effect: Dad was a butcher’s son, and he had a lifelong passion for some of the more offal sorts of delicacies–and of course he had the recipes and the ability to prove it. Which is why I generally avoided the “what are you most likely to find in your refrigerator?” types of questions, as I’d have been in danger of writing about the pickled tongue, or the pigs’ feet, or the tripe…. (the “boar’s head” at the top of this post is one of Dad’s efforts, done for a long-ago Hogmanay celebration with a Scottish friend.)

    I am told my great-grandfather was a fan of pickled pig’s feet. Despite not being versed in the anatomy of said feet, it always seemed they were unlikely to be inedible. Would you saying given our new reality we should reconsider investigating the delicacies of our ancestors?

    • #18
  19. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    Jalapeno Deviled Eggs — this is by taste, so I’m not giving exact measurements:

    1 dozen hard boiled eggs sliced in half and yolks processed through a strainer to get them nice and smooth

    Lots of real mayonnaise — we like them pretty fluffy. I’d say about 1/2 a cup, maybe more

    A little apple cider vinegar (you’re going to add pickling juice from the jalapenos) — about 1/2 a teaspoon, maybe more

    1/2 a teaspoon of yellow mustard (careful with this)

    salt and pepper

    pickled jalapenos — hotness depending on your taste and what you can find. I usually use mild, but had to combine with some hot this year since I ran out. Maybe 1/4 cup chopped? But, it’s really up to your taste.

    A teaspoon or so of the pickling juice.

    Once you’re satisfied with the flavor, I put the mix in a small sandwich bag, cut off one corner, and “pipe” it into the egg halves. Works great!

    We find other deviled egg recipes just don’t measure up.

     

    • #19
  20. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    She (View Comment):

    A few years ago, a friend who was staying with us–and who was quite a good cook–suggested cooking the turkey upside-down. I have no idea if this was a family tradition, or just a spontaneous revelation, but I’ve since followed the advice. IMHO, it works rather well, as the juices from the fattier (darker) parts drip down to the less so (breast), rendering (see what I did there) the bird even more moist and tasty. Just a thought. If you’re worried about appearances (I’m not, as must be clear by now) you can turn it before serving, and let the “broil” setting brown the top of the bird, but IMHO that’s not necessary. Once it’s carved, it assumes something of an all cats are grey in the dark aspect, and no-one will know.

    I’ve done that for years. I don’t bother basting, and I don’t brine it. I do flip it over for the last half hour.

    • #20
  21. Hang On Member
    Hang On
    @HangOn

    JustmeinAZ (View Comment):

    Hang On (View Comment):

    I’ve never really liked turkey so I do a roast beef. Simple but increasingly expensive. (Thank you Brandon. ) Peel onions and chop mushrooms. Rub the beef with salt, pepper and garlic. Stick it in the oven at 275 for 4 or 5 hours with a thermometer roasting mushrooms and onions in the juices. That’s my contribution.

    Need more info. What kind of roast? Weight? Is this a pot roast type of roast?

    Tenderloin. I have a roasting pan where the beef is on top and I put the onions and mushrooms (garlic is also good) in the bottom where the juices drip. Weight? Depends on what is needed/wanted. Makes great sandwiches with leftovers. I like it still pink in the middle, so I  pay attention to the temperature on thermometer while also cutting it for visual inspection. I’m seat-of-the-pants cook. 99% of the time things turn out delicious, but consistency in terms of things being like last time is far from assured. You can use other veggies for roasting (I’ve tried) but I’d prefer them raw in a salad.

    And as @She said, the mushrooms are important. I prefer Portobello mushrooms.

    I don’t know about you, but from the smells in my kitchen and reading this post (jalapeño deviled eggs is going on my list of things to try making), I’m ready to tuck in.

    • #21
  22. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    She (View Comment):

    Duplicate.  Not sure why.  Ah, sweet mysteries of Ricochet!

    • #22
  23. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Jalapeno Deviled Eggs — this is by taste, so I’m not giving exact measurements:

    1 dozen hard boiled eggs sliced in half and yolks processed through a strainer to get them nice and smooth

    Lots of real mayonnaise — we like them pretty fluffy. I’d say about 1/2 a cup, maybe more

    A little apple cider vinegar (you’re going to add pickling juice from the jalapenos) — about 1/2 a teaspoon, maybe more

    1/2 a teaspoon of yellow mustard (careful with this)

    salt and pepper

    pickled jalapenos — hotness depending on your taste and what you can find. I usually use mild, but had to combine with some hot this year since I ran out. Maybe 1/4 cup chopped? But, it’s really up to your taste.

    A teaspoon or so of the pickling juice.

    Once you’re satisfied with the flavor, I put the mix in a small sandwich bag, cut off one corner, and “pipe” it into the egg halves. Works great!

    We find other deviled egg recipes just don’t measure up.

    Scrumptious!  Thanks.  (I’m at a spot in my life where I need to find things to do with eggs…..)

    • #23
  24. 9thDistrictNeighbor Member
    9thDistrictNeighbor
    @9thDistrictNeighbor

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Jalapeno Deviled Eggs

    I’m going to try this today!

    • #24
  25. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    My task this week is to be The Provider” and “The Good Son” to my 90 year old mother.  I brought oranges, her favorite Subway Sandwiches, McRib’s, Peach Pie, Strawberry Rhubarb Pie, Butter Pecan Ice Cream. Blue Berry Eggos, and four potatoes.  The extent of my cooking was to drape the potatoes with wet dish rags, and to microwave them for six minutes, turn them over, apply more wet dish rags, and microwave them again for a half dozen minutes, then cover them with a butter and a warmed up refrigerated beef tip stew from Safeway.

    My mother walks with a Walker and specially made shoes with hard plastic braces for her calves, except when she is in a heated pool, after being rolled into it on a PCV wheelchair.  Then, she can walk on her own as the water holds her up.  I don’t know if being in the pool is better for her legs or her spirit or both.  Afterwards we stopped at The Olive Garden for take-out and their $5 specials.  It will take a couple of days to finish off the Olive Garden food.

    My sister is cooking a Turkey, and we will be happy to eat at her table with her brood.

    The other food covered here sound fantastic.  But I will choose the store-bought food with my mother and family.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    • #25
  26. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Duplicate.

    • #26
  27. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):

    A few years ago, a friend who was staying with us–and who was quite a good cook–suggested cooking the turkey upside-down. I have no idea if this was a family tradition, or just a spontaneous revelation, but I’ve since followed the advice. IMHO, it works rather well, as the juices from the fattier (darker) parts drip down to the less so (breast), rendering (see what I did there) the bird even more moist and tasty. Just a thought. If you’re worried about appearances (I’m not, as must be clear by now) you can turn it before serving, and let the “broil” setting brown the top of the bird, but IMHO that’s not necessary. Once it’s carved, it assumes something of an all cats are grey in the dark aspect, and no-one will know.

    Yes, this is the technique recommended by the America’s Test Kitchen recipe I use. But, you turn it over for the last hour or so to get the crispy browned skin. Prep is important, too, since you brine the bird for up to 6 hours and then leave it uncovered in the fridge to dry out the skin for up to 24 hours. This is what I mean by being too tiiired. I started cooking on Monday.

    Thanks.  Another example of how there is [very little] new under the sun.  Hope your feast is as delectable as it all sounds.  Happy Thanksgiving!

    • #27
  28. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Prep is important, too, since you brine the bird for up to 6 hours and then leave it uncovered in the fridge to dry out the skin for up to 24 hours.

    A few years ago I tried brining our turkey and I found it just too salty for my taste. Everyone else thought it was moist and tasty. I’m just one of those who barely add salt to anything because I don’t like salty stuff.

    • #28
  29. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    Hang On (View Comment):
    Tenderloin. I have a roasting pan where the beef is on top and I put the onions and mushrooms (garlic is also good) in the bottom where the juices drip. Weight? Depends on what is needed/wanted. Makes great sandwiches with leftovers. I like it still pink in the middle, so I  pay attention to the temperature on thermometer while also cutting it for visual inspection.

    Ah. That’s what I wanted to know. A good roast must be at least pink and maybe just a tad more rare. Hmmm. Tenderloin. Still only $20/lb.

    • #29
  30. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Jalapeno Deviled Eggs — this is by taste, so I’m not giving exact measurements:

    1 dozen hard boiled eggs sliced in half and yolks processed through a strainer to get them nice and smooth

    Lots of real mayonnaise — we like them pretty fluffy. I’d say about 1/2 a cup, maybe more

    A little apple cider vinegar (you’re going to add pickling juice from the jalapenos) — about 1/2 a teaspoon, maybe more

    1/2 a teaspoon of yellow mustard (careful with this)

    salt and pepper

    pickled jalapenos — hotness depending on your taste and what you can find. I usually use mild, but had to combine with some hot this year since I ran out. Maybe 1/4 cup chopped? But, it’s really up to your taste.

    A teaspoon or so of the pickling juice.

    Once you’re satisfied with the flavor, I put the mix in a small sandwich bag, cut off one corner, and “pipe” it into the egg halves. Works great!

    We find other deviled egg recipes just don’t measure up.

     

    Oh, yes. I’ve made deviled eggs with pickled jalapenos instead of sweet pickle relish. Yummy.

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