Glenn Loury’s Journey From Chicago’s South Side to The Ivy League And Beyond

 

 

Professor Glenn Loury is in social sciences and economics at Brown University. Prior to that, he became a tenured professor of economics at Harvard at the age of 33. How he got from there to here is an inspiring and fascinating story of hard work and accomplishment that is explored in great detail in this interview. Professor Loury also explains the crucial role his parents and his extended family played in his education and his opinions. Now, in his 70’s Loury has become a leading spokesman on the right, often speaking out against woke culture prevalent on many campuses and other institutions. He also explains his radical (for an academic institution, at least) reading list and syllabus for the courses he teaches at Brown and how an undergraduate student/teaching assistant inspired Professor Loury to create a course intended to liberate his students from the “groupthink” that is far too prevalent at most universities.

Recorded at Fox News in NYC on October 28, 2021

Published in General
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  1. davenr321 Coolidge
    davenr321
    @davenr321

    Every thinking American should know who Glenn Loury is. His life experiences, warts and all – including his escapes, his talks about the books he’s reading, what he’s doing, etc. are worth repeated listens. I’ve been a fan for years and credit him with seriously challenging me to get smarter.  I feel pretty good about my hero-worship of Dr. Glenn Loury – regardless of any differences I might have with him.

    • #1
  2. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Thanks so much for this interview. I especially appreciated Professor Loury’s thoughts that economics, materialism, utilitarianism is not the answer. I agree with Manny that libertarianism has, to some extent, warped conservative thought. It’s not all about the Benjamins (to not quote Ilan Omar).

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