Federal Ungovernment

 

I thought there was some sort of a plan.  Slide Sir Biden the Blank into office, accomplish awful things, pile it on his back and drive him into the desert to clear the path for Harris the Harpy — the unelected giving way to the unelectable.  I wonder if that’s what we’re seeing, though.  I can’t make much of a case — this is just another way of looking at the same problem.

Heaven and particularly Hell know that the DNC and the DLC split played a great part in Democrat politics for the last twenty years.  Whether the Clinton DLC is still a thing is anybody’s guess — my guess is it was quietly folded more directly into the Clinton crime family’s pay-for-play apparatus, the Clinton Global Initiative, and so forth.  Why maintain an auditable organization once you have your unauditable scam running?

So faction is not new to the left.  With the Squad types ranging the far left — delivering effective fire into the squishy left without being hit — the more conventional socialist operators like Pelosi and Schiff, and the crazy-but-not-Squad loons like Waters and Jackson Lee have their own fights going on internally and of course externally.  Naturally, they can count on the weakest Republicans for support in their more lucrative schemes — thanks for the Infraporkulus, guys!

The Democrats now own every last stick of furniture in Washington DC.  What’s left to do but fight amongst themselves?  Fauci may be a puppet, but he’s a canny character.  He currently wears the ring that others must kiss, but he does not own it.  He has the power to make socialist dreams come true, which is of course happening.  We have lockdowns (control), masks (conditioning), mandatory injections (money), and towering welfare “COVID relief” spending (dependency).  Soon, we will have internal passport control and an increasingly rationalized surveillance operation.  The fascists of the last century are smacking their foreheads at the miraculous power of the fascism of this century.  Government and Big [insert industry] working together to control and track the masses.  No need to oppress the people when they will pay to have it done, and complain when they cannot have it.  Genius.

So Fauci is the uneasy rider of the most powerful but most fickle horse in a field of many.  The Defense establishment knows to mostly keep its head low — too obvious.  The Defense purge is internal, limited to the DoD.  NSA-flavored entities and Google-flavored companies (to include Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and more) have teamed up to operate the infrastructure that matters, and upon which the rest of government and business run.  The FBI functions increasingly as a secret police, selectively enforcing laws and diktats against political enemies of the current fascist regime.

CNN (state media) ran an apparently authorized hit piece on Harris.  Can’t say what’s actually going on there.  Is it White-House-approved to get rid of her, or Congress-approved to rescue her?  Or is some other faction aggrieved and firing at the administration as a whole?  Sure, it could be just a story written by an honest reporter, but that’s not our collective (ahem) experience with what gets greenlit by the suits at CNN for high-profile attacks on Democrats.  As simple as the last option is, I do not find it the most likely, given the track record — one of the complications of living in crazy times.

A power struggle in our Kremlin-on-the-Potomac is not a good sign.  If the Wizards of state centralization have failed to hold their confascily together, then they are competing, and the most ruthless, most effective, most able to bend the powers of government to its will is going to wind up ruling us.

Are we seeing a failed consolidation of power turn into a power struggle?

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  1. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Wherever there is power there is always a nonstop struggle for it.

    Regarding the current situation with Democrats, picking Harris was political genius on FJB’s part.   Having Harris as VP is the only thing standing between FJB and the 25th Amendment.    If there is a movement afoot to oust Harris it can only be the opening move in an effort to remove FJB.    He can’t be gotten rid of until there is someone palatable as VP.    

    • #1
  2. Kevin Schulte Member
    Kevin Schulte
    @KevinSchulte

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    Wherever there is power there is always a nonstop struggle for it.

    Regarding the current situation with Democrats, picking Harris was political genius on FJB’s part. Having Harris as VP is the only thing standing between FJB and the 25th Amendment. If there is a movement afoot to oust Harris it can only be the opening move in an effort to remove FJB. He can’t be gotten rid of until there is someone palatable as VP.

    Nah, keep her damaged and as unappealing as possible. It’s called shoring up your insurance policy. 

    The attacks on her will only go so far.

    • #2
  3. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Kevin Schulte (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    Wherever there is power there is always a nonstop struggle for it.

    Regarding the current situation with Democrats, picking Harris was political genius on FJB’s part. Having Harris as VP is the only thing standing between FJB and the 25th Amendment. If there is a movement afoot to oust Harris it can only be the opening move in an effort to remove FJB. He can’t be gotten rid of until there is someone palatable as VP.

    Nah, keep her damaged and as unappealing as possible. It’s called shoring up your insurance policy.

    The attacks on her will only go so far.

    Good point.    Periodically remind everyone just how unsavory the alternative is.   

    • #3
  4. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    There is too much power in DC.

    That is the core problem, and not even Trump was good enough on it. 

    • #4
  5. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    There is too much power in DC.

    That is the core problem, and not even Trump was good enough on it.

    While Trump could have done better at this or that, I credit him with doing all that could be done given the circumstances.  One of the most valuable things he did was expose the deeper problems.  I recognize that this will sound like special pleading, but it is consistent with my pre-Trump claims that the GOP is comfortable with second place and in fact resists opportunities to create real change.  That’s exactly what we saw.

    • #5
  6. Henry Racette Contributor
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    Yes, the Democrats are proving to be about as competent at administering D.C. as they were running their 2020 primary season. Remember, this is the party that made a desperation play of grabbing the least controversial plausible candidate to avoid ending up with Bernie Sanders — and then letting their choice pick perhaps the worst possible running mate based solely on her sex and skin color. Now they have a ludicrously weak President* and a Vice President* no one can stand: that’s a bug, not a feature.

    Meanwhile, Washington’s power is hardly unchecked. Congress is divided by a razor thin margin. The courts are frustrating Biden’s executive overreach. Almost half the states are suing the federal government to defang the execrable Fauci. The public is disgusted with the administration and with Democrats in general, and 2022 is shaping up to be, fingers crossed, a blow-out year for Republicans.

    So Democrats are fighting over what is likely to be fleeting control of an unpopular government. The winners must be aware that, if they are as radical as the loudest voices in their party, the nation is going to savage them at the polls — may do so anyway. And when the dust settles a year from now and, fingers crossed again, the Democrats have control of neither Congress nor the Supreme Court, the Democrats will possess a White House likely in the hands of a doddering simpleton and an unlovable nullity, both most probably lame ducks moving into 2024.

    Interesting times, indeed.

    • #6
  7. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    the Democrats will possess a White House likely in the hands of a doddering simpleton and an unlovable nullity, both most probably lame ducks moving into 2024.

    Don’t forget that their signature legislation ended up a muddy mess that failed on the Fundamental Transformation front, and their cultural issues are mostly losers. It’s possible the party will think they just didn’t do enough, and redouble their efforts. Which would be delicious. 

    Crime and civil disorder isn’t going to abate. A canny presidential candidate who can tie urban disorder to lax prog prosecutors, make it a nationwide issue, will get traction. It reveals the precepts of the vanguard of the party. 

    • #7
  8. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Meanwhile, Washington’s power is hardly unchecked. Congress is divided by a razor thin margin. …

    So Democrats are fighting over what is likely to be fleeting control of an unpopular government.

    Ha! As if Congress has some sort of power. Washington’s power – the power of the permanent state – operates above and beyond the Constitution. Want to crack down on dissent? Send in the FBI. Want to funnel funds to an ally? ‘Settle’ a ‘case’. Think the courts will protect you? Think again – the Supremes will punt rather than confront. 

    • #8
  9. Henry Racette Contributor
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    genferei (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Meanwhile, Washington’s power is hardly unchecked. Congress is divided by a razor thin margin. …

    So Democrats are fighting over what is likely to be fleeting control of an unpopular government.

    Ha! As if Congress has some sort of power. Washington’s power – the power of the permanent state – operates above and beyond the Constitution. Want to crack down on dissent? Send in the FBI. Want to funnel funds to an ally? ‘Settle’ a ‘case’. Think the courts will protect you? Think again – the Supremes will punt rather than confront.

    Oh, I understand your point, and I’m not saying that the system is working exactly as the Founders hoped it would. We have a bureaucratic nightmare on our hands and it needs to be beaten back. I appreciated President Trump’s efforts in that regard.

    But it is nonetheless true that Washington’s power is not unlimited. The courts routinely block presidential overreach. Congress is unable to implement many of the left’s very bad ideas. The states push back, and sometimes they win.

    There are lots of abuses, lots of corruption of important federal agencies, and way too much unsupervised power. I hope we can eventually rein that in. It’s going to take strong governors and Constitutionally literate judges (and I thank President Trump for the latter).

    • #9
  10. I Walton Member
    I Walton
    @IWalton

    Of course we see a power struggle, but we should know how such things come out in the struggle for totalitarianism.  If they steal the next elections, i.e. totalitarianism is already in place, our choice is to leave, take states and pieces of states that want freedom with us, or stay and fight a multigenerational battle.    So the election and everything leading to it is far more important than most people realize and if we want any chance of winning an election, we have to let them  know that separation is a viable option.  Of course Republican leaders who pretend Biden legitimately won the last election are undermining our future because it shows they can fool almost everybody.

    • #10
  11. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    We have a bureaucratic nightmare on our hands and it needs to be beaten back. I appreciated President Trump’s efforts in that regard.

    Efforts that were not merely resisted, but actively undermined by many in his own party. What was concretely achieved at HUD, Education or Energy (not to mention State, Defence and the three letter agencies) that was not instantly rolled back – or worse – by last February? (The Abraham Accords, perhaps.)

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    The courts routinely block presidential overreach.

    Hmmm. I saw lots of the scrupulously constitutional Trump admin complying with even the wackiest judicial pronouncements. I’m not sure I’m seeing the same from Resident Depends’ string-pullers. 

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    There are lots of abuses, lots of corruption of important federal agencies, and way too much unsupervised power. I hope we can eventually rein that in. It’s going to take strong governors and Constitutionally literate judges (and I thank President Trump for the latter).

    Who’s counseling despair now (: ? As for the crop of judges we’ve been told are believers in the constitution, I’m beginning to wonder if we haven’t been sold a bill of goods on that, too. 

    • #11
  12. Henry Racette Contributor
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    genferei (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    We have a bureaucratic nightmare on our hands and it needs to be beaten back. I appreciated President Trump’s efforts in that regard.

    Efforts that were not merely resisted, but actively undermined by many in his own party. What was concretely achieved at HUD, Education or Energy (not to mention State, Defence and the three letter agencies) that was not instantly rolled back – or worse – by last February? (The Abraham Accords, perhaps.)

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    The courts routinely block presidential overreach.

    Hmmm. I saw lots of the scrupulously constitutional Trump admin complying with even the wackiest judicial pronouncements. I’m not sure I’m seeing the same from Resident Depends’ string-pullers.

    Henry Racette (View Comment):
    There are lots of abuses, lots of corruption of important federal agencies, and way too much unsupervised power. I hope we can eventually rein that in. It’s going to take strong governors and Constitutionally literate judges (and I thank President Trump for the latter).

    Who’s counseling despair now (: ? As for the crop of judges we’ve been told are believers in the constitution, I’m beginning to wonder if we haven’t been sold a bill of goods on that, too.

    The Supreme Court picks have been underwhelming. But there are a couple of hundred others in the lower courts. And I’ve liked recent rulings stalling Brandon administration moves.

    • #12