Poland Fighting For Its Freedom – Why Doesn’t America?

 

Poland is fighting against a powerful tide – more like a tidal wave. The leadership is fighting for its sovereignty, freedom, and the heart and soul of a country that has suffered so much. Does that sound familiar?  The European Union is not amused.  Maybe it is because Poland only threw off the stranglehold of communism in 1989, and they remember the oppression.  That’s only 32 years ago.  Can you imagine for a moment if the United States was only free for the last 32 years?

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, in an October 18 letter to EU leaders:

Poland’s Constitutional Tribunal has ruled that Polish law takes precedence over European Union law. The landmark ruling, which seeks to reassert national sovereignty over certain judicial matters, has called into question the legitimacy of the EU’s supranational legal and political order.

More recently, Germany’s Constitutional Court issued an unprecedented ruling that directly challenged the authority of the European Central Bank to purchase vast amounts of government bonds, a monetary policy known as quantitative easing. The German court ruled that the practice is illegal under German law as neither the German government nor the German parliament signed off on the purchases. The EU’s legal feud with its largest member has threatened to unravel not only Europe’s single currency, the euro, but the EU itself.

I want to make you concerned — and draw your attention to a dangerous phenomenon that threatens the future of our Union. We ought to be anxious about the gradual transformation of the Union into an entity that would cease to be an alliance of free, equal and sovereign states, and instead become a single, centrally managed organism, run by institutions deprived of democratic control by the citizens of European countries. If we do not stop this phenomenon, all will feel its negative effects. Today it may concern just one country — tomorrow, under a different pretext, another….

From the Gatestone Institute, Oct. 26:

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, pledged that the Polish challenge to the supremacy of EU law will not be left unanswered, but she did not say what the bloc would do, or when.

The root cause of the tensions is a worldview conflict: Poland is one of the most conservative countries in Europe and the Polish government, supported by a large segment of the population, believes that Polish society should be organized around the principles and values of Roman Catholicism. This is directly at odds with the post-Christian worldview held by most EU officials, many of whom worship at the altar of multiculturalism. The conflict has been instigated and perpetuated by unelected bureaucrats in Brussels who want to remake Poland in the EU’s image.

What happens when a country’s founding documents, where the rule of law and freedom itself is drawn, is in conflict with the worldview, or the powerful who sit behind things like The Great Reset? Does the identity and soul of that country become eroded or stronger? Polish Freedom Fighter Col. Kuklinski thought Poland was worth fighting for. The current leadership of Poland believes it is worth fighting for.  Is America worth fighting for?

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  1. DonG (CAGW is a hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a hoax)
    @DonG

    The Poles know what it is like to be ruled by Commies and Socialists.  They like their country and still make babies. 
    I am thinking I should get me one of these.

     

    Solidarity / Solidarnosc | White & Red Flag t-Shirt 1980s T-Shirt

    • #1
  2. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    The last combat units of the Russian Army left Poland in 1994. As one writer put it concerning the EU; Poland was not impressed with the old totalitarians, and they are not impressed with the new totalitarians. 

    • #2
  3. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    You just gotta love Poland

    • #3
  4. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    You just gotta love Poland

    I just gave your post a LIKE – I missed that one – thank you for inserting it here – good story!

    • #4
  5. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    The answer to the question posed in the post: we have traitors in charge. Treason is the crime when leaders betray their oaths and give aid and comfort to the enemy in this “worldview conflict” which is a war between a handful of sovereign nations and the globalists. We have that when we hear “build back better”.

    • #5
  6. I. M. Fine Coolidge
    I. M. Fine
    @IMFine

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle. 

    • #6
  7. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Well done, FSC! We need to take lessons from the Poles!

    • #7
  8. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    Be sure to offer a report. 

    • #8
  9. I. M. Fine Coolidge
    I. M. Fine
    @IMFine

    DaveSchmidt (View Comment):

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    Be sure to offer a report.

    I plan to keep a good journal and take photos. I’ll be happy to share whatever experiences might seem of interest to fellow Ricochetti.

    • #9
  10. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Superb post.

    Poland is also engaged in trying to find its roots. Here is my report from time in Krakow, singing with a Jewish choir.

    • #10
  11. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    Front Seat Cat: What happens when a country’s founding documents, where the rule of law and freedom itself is drawn, is in conflict with the worldview, or the powerful who sit behind things like The Great Reset?  Does the identity and soul of that country become eroded or stronger? … Is America worth fighting for?

    A wonderful post. The answer rests in the number of fighters versus the number of those willing to rationalize away every bite that tears away more of the flesh off of our liberty. And fighters come from those willing to see past the lie. 

    Some great passages from The Struggle and the Triumph:

    [Walesa:] “We inhabit a country that has over the centuries been overrun and overcome by its neighbors. If this ever happens again, at least it can be said that during the Holy Father’s visit in 1987, he underscored a simple fact: Without a free Poland, a free Europe is not possible.” – Page 114 

    So then the Government created its own crowd, calling on Party loyalists and young people from the state-run enterprises to turn out and welcome the pope. … They were told to react neither too coldly nor too enthusiastically to the pope, and of course there were to be no upraised hands, no V-for-victory signs, no cheering. Each of them was handed a small flag and assigned a place to stand. …

    The line of vehicles passed quickly through the silent crowd. There was no clamoring, no emotion, only small flags waving mechanically back and forth. The figure in white approached the monument, followed close behind by Cardinal Glemp and Archbishops Casaroli, Colasuonno, and Martinez. The pope knelt, prayed, and gazed thoughtfully at the three anchors. “Divine Providence could not do better,” he said. “In this place, silence is a cry!” – Page 119

    Similarly, without a free America, large scale liberty in this world becomes extinct. Also, “In this place, silence is a cry!” has many uses here…today.

    More…on why it is important to fight the descent into the abyss and not wait to fight until the damage is done:

    Even after an operation that restored democracy and independence, my poor homeland, drained nearly dry after fifty years of parasites and outside interests, would remain ill for a long time. – Page 125

    • #11
  12. ToryWarWriter Reagan
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    You should try and do a meetup with Miffed.  

    • #12
  13. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    iWe (View Comment):

    Superb post.

    Poland is also engaged in trying to find its roots. Here is my report from time in Krakow, singing with a Jewish choir.

    “The citizens of Poland have the world’s highest count of individuals who have been recognized by Yad Vashem of Jerusalem as the Polish Righteous Among the Nations, for saving Jews from extermination during the Holocaust in World War II. There are 7,112 (as of 1 January 2020) Polish men and women recognized as Righteous Among the Nations, over a quarter of the 27,712 recognized by Yad Vashem in total. The list of Righteous is not comprehensive and it is estimated that hundreds of thousands of Poles concealed and aided hundreds of thousands of their Polish-Jewish neighbors. Many of these initiatives were carried out by individuals, but there also existed organized networks of Polish resistance which were dedicated to aiding Jews – most notably, the Żegota organization.”

    In German-occupied Poland, the task of rescuing Jews was difficult and dangerous. All household members were subject to capital punishment if a Jew was found concealed in their home or on their property.” – from Wikipedia

    • #13
  14. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    philo (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat: What happens when a country’s founding documents, where the rule of law and freedom itself is drawn, is in conflict with the worldview, or the powerful who sit behind things like The Great Reset? Does the identity and soul of that country become eroded or stronger? … Is America worth fighting for?

    A wonderful post. The answer rests in the number of fighters versus the number of those willing to rationalize away every bite that tears away more of the flesh off of our liberty. And fighters come from those willing to see past the lie.

    Some great passages from The Struggle and the Triumph:

    [Walesa:] “We inhabit a country that has over the centuries been overrun and overcome by its neighbors. If this ever happens again, at least it can be said that during the Holy Father’s visit in 1987, he underscored a simple fact: Without a free Poland, a free Europe is not possible.” – Page 114

    So then the Government created its own crowd, calling on Party loyalists and young people from the state-run enterprises to turn out and welcome the pope. … They were told to react neither too coldly nor too enthusiastically to the pope, and of course there were to be no upraised hands, no V-for-victory signs, no cheering. Each of them was handed a small flag and assigned a place to stand. …

    The line of vehicles passed quickly through the silent crowd. There was no clamoring, no emotion, only small flags waving mechanically back and forth. The figure in white approached the monument, followed close behind by Cardinal Glemp and Archbishops Casaroli, Colasuonno, and Martinez. The pope knelt, prayed, and gazed thoughtfully at the three anchors. “Divine Providence could not do better,” he said. “In this place, silence is a cry!” – Page 119

    Similarly, without a free America, large scale liberty in this world becomes extinct. Also, “In this place, silence is a cry!” has many uses here…today.

    More…on why it is important to fight the descent into the abyss and not wait to fight until the damage is done:

    Even after an operation that restored democracy and independence, my poor homeland, drained nearly dry after fifty years of parasites and outside interests, would remain ill for a long time. – Page 125

    Here is President Trump’s speech in Poland – Lech Walenza was in the crowd – listen to the cheering – there is no quiet flag waving and assigned standing.  Trump understood freedom and they understood his message:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFTKl5bzD78

    • #14
  15. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    philo (View Comment):
    The answer rests in the number of fighters versus the number of those willing to rationalize away every bite that tears away more of the flesh off of our liberty.

    Those are the key words to what I’ve been trying to identify recently.  People focusing on the details, the wording, the third decimal place, the minutia, and finding each bit to be individually insignificant.  As opposed to seeing its place in a greater picture.

    • #15
  16. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Front Seat Cat: Is America worth fighting for?

    This gave me a chill.  Not is a good way.  Poland is at least not at war with itself.

    • #16
  17. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    Flicker (View Comment):

    philo (View Comment):
    The answer rests in the number of fighters versus the number of those willing to rationalize away every bite that tears away more of the flesh off of our liberty.

    Those are the key words to what I’ve been trying to identify recently. People focusing on the details, the wording, the third decimal place, the minutia, and finding each bit to be individually insignificant. As opposed to seeing its place in a greater picture.

    Once you see it, you tend to see it everywhere. A few days ago, somewhere around here, I pointed out the “Common Sense Mandate Rationalizations” that reminded me so much of the condescending Common Sense Gun Legislation routine that we are treated to every couple of years. I’ve gone as far as labeling extreme cases of this mental illness as “muddleheadedness.” When it starts to get too pervasive on sort-of-center-right-ish places like this, you can bet it is spreading like wildfire out there in the real world.

    • #17
  18. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    philo (View Comment):

    Once you see it, you tend to see it everywhere. A few days ago, somewhere around here, I pointed out the “Common Sense Mandate Rationalizations” that reminded me so much of the condescending Common Sense Gun Legislation routine that we are treated to every couple of years. I’ve gone as far as labeling extreme cases of this mental illness as “muddleheadedness.” When it starts to get too pervasive on sort-of-center-right-ish places like this, you can bet it is spreading like wildfire out there in the real world.

    Yes, I remember this now.  I also remember trying to remember the word you used, and not being able to find it.

    • #18
  19. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

     

    “The citizens of Poland have the world’s highest count of individuals who have been recognized by Yad Vashem of Jerusalem as the Polish Righteous Among the Nations, for saving Jews from extermination during the Holocaust in World War II…..

    All true. But Poland was also a place with pogroms and a great many who were delighted with the elimination of the Jews.

    Americans don’t have any real exposure to deep anti-semitism, because ours is a country with very, very little of it. But when I lived in England we had an au pair who came from a working-class Hungarian upbringing. She refused to eat for the first week, and then only nibbled for a time, before finally eating properly. 

    6 months later she told us that she was shocked to discover we were Jewish, because her father had always told her that if you take food from a Jew, you would grow horns. She told us she was penniless and hungry, so she ended up eating a bit, and examined her head nightly to see if horns were sprouting. 

    I kid you not.  

    Stories like these are not uncommon. We had a friend in London whose au pair, after a lovely year together, left a note when she left that she had made sure to always put pork into their weekly Shabbos stew. I cannot describe how distressing that would be to an observant Jewish family – which is clearly why she did it.

    • #19
  20. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    iWe (View Comment):

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

     

    “The citizens of Poland have the world’s highest count of individuals who have been recognized by Yad Vashem of Jerusalem as the Polish Righteous Among the Nations, for saving Jews from extermination during the Holocaust in World War II…..

    All true. But Poland was also a place with pogroms and a great many who were delighted with the elimination of the Jews.

    Americans don’t have any real exposure to deep anti-semitism, because ours is a country with very, very little of it. But when I lived in England we had an au pair who came from a working-class Hungarian upbringing. She refused to eat for the first week, and then only nibbled for a time, before finally eating properly.

    6 months later she told us that she was shocked to discover we were Jewish, because her father had always told her that if you take food from a Jew, you would grow horns. She told us she was penniless and hungry, so she ended up eating a bit, and examined her head nightly to see if horns were sprouting.

    I kid you not.

    Stories like these are not uncommon. We had a friend in London whose au pair, after a lovely year together, left a note when she left that she had made sure to always put pork into their weekly Shabbos stew. I cannot describe how distressing that would be to an observant Jewish family – which is clearly why she did it.

    Yes, unfortunately some human beings have an abundance of ignorance, pettiness, and brutality. You can hate another human being because of their skin color, or their religion. The rationalizations for doing so are passed from generation to generation.

    • #20
  21. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Doug Watt (View Comment):
    The rationalizations for doing so are passed from generation to generation.

    The individual decides. Some do operate with the decided disadvantage of having been indoctrinated but some actually think for themselves.

    • #21
  22. Chris Hutchinson Coolidge
    Chris Hutchinson
    @chrishutch13

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    I am sorry I didn’t notice this post earlier. If I had seen your comment I would certainly have invited you for coffee. Poland is a wonderful place to live and I would have loved a Ricochet meetup in my adopted home.

    • #22
  23. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Chris Hutchinson (View Comment):

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    I am sorry I didn’t notice this post earlier. If I had seen your comment I would certainly have invited you for coffee. Poland is a wonderful place to live and I would have loved a Ricochet meetup in my adopted home.

    Chris – what is going on with regards to the borders and the influx of refugees, and is there any concern with what is going on with Russia and Ukraine right now?  

    • #23
  24. Chris Hutchinson Coolidge
    Chris Hutchinson
    @chrishutch13

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Chris Hutchinson (View Comment):

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    I am sorry I didn’t notice this post earlier. If I had seen your comment I would certainly have invited you for coffee. Poland is a wonderful place to live and I would have loved a Ricochet meetup in my adopted home.

    Chris – what is going on with regards to the borders and the influx of refugees, and is there any concern with what is going on with Russia and Ukraine right now?

    As of right now the Poles are holding fast on the border so no influx on our side. It got a bit tense today, needing to pull out the water canons when some of the Polish police got injured but calmed down fairly quickly. The Poles have it under control right now but Belarus continues to bring people to the border.

    There is definitely concern with the Russian build-up but truthfully there’s always a concern with them over in this region even when there’s not something big going on in the news. In this case some think it may be a bigger concern than usual because they think the stuff at the Belarus/Poland border, which is absolutely 100% being orchestrated by Moscow, is being used as a distraction. I’m not sure… maybe because I work in Defense & Intelligence but I am always (I originally typed “also” accidentally but meant “always”) concerned with what Russia is doing.

    • #24
  25. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Chris Hutchinson (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Chris Hutchinson (View Comment):

    I. M. Fine (View Comment):

    Thank you for this timely and well-referenced post. I’m deeply interested in the current state of affairs in Poland. Next Thursday I am headed to Warsaw and then on to Krakow. The purpose of my visit is largely cultural, but I am sure I will experience the current state of the political climate as well. Poland is, indeed, at a crossroads. The questions you pose lie at the heart of their struggle.

    I am sorry I didn’t notice this post earlier. If I had seen your comment I would certainly have invited you for coffee. Poland is a wonderful place to live and I would have loved a Ricochet meetup in my adopted home.

    Chris – what is going on with regards to the borders and the influx of refugees, and is there any concern with what is going on with Russia and Ukraine right now?

    As of right now the Poles are holding fast on the border so no influx on our side. It got a bit tense today, needing to pull out the water canons when some of the Polish police got injured but calmed down fairly quickly. The Poles have it under control right now but Belarus continues to bring people to the border.

    There is definitely concern with the Russian build-up but truthfully there’s always a concern with them over in this region even when there’s not something big going on in the news. In this case some think it may be a bigger concern than usual because they think the stuff at the Belarus/Poland border, which is absolutely 100% being orchestrated by Moscow, is being used as a distraction. I’m not sure… maybe because I work in Defense & Intelligence but I am also concerned with what Russia is doing.

    Yes – That looks like a set up – distract the Poles on one side with refugees while Russia stirs the pot further with Ukraine and the tensions in Belarus – Poland is right to be concerned.

    • #25
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