Law Talk With Epstein, Yoo, & Senik
Episode 35: Guns, Twinkies, and Weed

Hosted by Troy Senik
Dec 18, 2012
Direct Link to MP3 File

This week on Law Talk with Epstein and Yoo, Troy Senik and the the professors look at the tragedy in Connecticut with some suggestions for sane approaches to legislating weapons and ammunition. Also, did the Founders anticipate automatic weapons? Then, a look at Michigan and right to work,  which segues into a classic “Law Talk” conversation on unions, Twinkies, and other important areas of American labor law and a look at the marijuana legalization movement. Finally, we close 2012 with a the professor’s picks for their favorite Christmas tune. We won’t spoil it here. See you next semester. 

It’s the law: anyone can benefit from Epstein and Yoo’s legal advice by subscribing to this podcast here. Direct link is here.

EJHill is the gift that keeps on giving.  

  1. Whiskey Sam

    I always knew deep down Richard was an Original Six kind of guy.

  2. Percival
    Whiskey Sam: I always knew deep down Richard was an Original Six kind of guy. · 26 minutes ago

    Yeah, Richard is committed to the Indian.

  3. Byron Horatio

    I have not had the chance to listen to the full podcast, but please someone tell me that the post contains a typo.  They don’t actually suggest that an automatic weapon was used in the shooting or that these types of weapons are readily available are they?

  4. SpinozaCarWash

    Doctor Franklin once said the only certain things in life are death and taxes.  Seems that the only certain subjects on this podcast are guns, gay marriage and marijuana.  And it’s getting stale.

  5. Troy Senik, Ed.
    C
    Byron Horatio: I have not had the chance to listen to the full podcast, but please someone tell me that the post contains a typo.  They don’t actually suggest that an automatic weapon was used in the shooting or that these types of weapons are readily available are they? · 54 minutes ago

    No, we didn’t. In fact, this discussion wasn’t even about the Newtown shooting. I simply asked them how they’d respond to the common liberal argument that the founders couldn’t have anticipated how dramatically different firearms are today from when the Second Amendment was ratified.

  6. Doctor Bean

    BTW, “Wrapping laziness in the cloak of tradition” is a terrific line. I will steal it.

    You three are really fun to listen to.

  7. Doctor Bean

    Terrific podcast. Always fascinating. Thank you.

  8. Brian Clendinen

    Troy I am with you. Zooey Deschanel singing “Its Cold out Side” with Leon Redbone on the soundtrack  in ‘Elf” is a classic, even though the movie is not that old.

  9. Israel P.

    Richard, the reason you cannot allow what you would consider reasonable restrictions is that the other side will pocket those as concessions and use them as the starting point for the next round of demands. This is the promise with so much of today’s negotiations with the left.

  10. UreyP3

    IMHO the 2nd Amendment was intended to recognize and preserve the right of self defense, individually and collectively.  To fret whether the founders anticipated modern weapons is as irrelevant to the 2nd Amendment as is fretting whether the founders anticipated television when they incorporated and enshrined freedom of speech in the 1st Amendment.  It is the inalienable right to defend self, others and community against violence and depredation that is enshrined.  The source of such depredation and violence (individuals, groups or government) is immaterial to the inalienable nature of the right.  The availability of effective firearms is the only way of insuring the continuing inviolability of the right of self defense and the continuing ability of the individual to protect and exercise that right.  Therefore, the Founding Fathers would welcome advancements in firearms design and development that enhanced the individual’s ability to exercise the right of self defense.  Clearly, they anticipated that the right to bear arms is the right to bear the modern arms of the age existent.  Without sustaining the right of self defense, no other right is safe nor can it be assured except by the forbearance of others – other individuals, other institutional entities.

  11. Percival

    Wasn’t Guns, Twinkies, and Weed the title of a Cheech and Chong movie?

  12. Mark Lewis
    Epstein – I loved hearing Woo “get” the rent-seeking of Unions and collective bargaining. Gorgeous. It is frustrating that something so clear is not widely understood.

    Your show is such a treat to me (literally, I only give myself time to listen to it when I have been “good.”) :-)

  13. Whiskey Sam

    BTW, loved the Cash clip played as the outro.  Those American recordings in the last years of his life were incredible.

  14. Anselm-Chin Jeres

    A true automatic weapon fired on auto is emptied or jammed in seconds, contrary to Rambo in a boat of empty shell casings…. grimacing while still shooting nonstop.  While the psycho reloads I will affix one shot at a time to his torso in a non-automatic style.

  15. Troy Senik, Ed.
    C
    Brian Clendinen: Troy I am with you. Zooey Deschanel singing “Its Cold out Side” with Leon Redbone on the soundtrack  in ‘Elf” is a classic, even though the movie is not that old. · 17 minutes ago

    The “Elf” reference was all John. I would’ve been representing the traditionalists on this question. My choice would have been Nat King Cole’s rendition of “O Holy Night.”

  16. Ramblin

    Would a ban on catapults include trebuchets?

  17. Archie Campbell

    I like Johnny Cash a lot (maybe not as much as Whiskey Sam, given that I’d bet he chose that name from “Drive On”), but that track was an appalling (or at least a jarring) choice for the last show before Christmas, especially after the cheerful holiday wishes just given.

  18. Brian Clendinen
    Troy Senik, Ed.

    Brian Clendinen: Troy I am with you. Zooey Deschanel singing “Its Cold out Side” with Leon Redbone on the soundtrack  in ‘Elf” is a classic, even though the movie is not that old. · 17 minutes ago

    The “Elf” reference was all John. I would’ve been representing the traditionalists on this question. My choice would have been Nat King Cole’s rendition of “O Holy Night.” · December 18, 2012 at 11:10am

    :), O sorry I stand corrected.

    I am not claiming it is my favorite Christmas Cover just the best version of that song and the movie scene with Will Ferrell singing the song is very memorable therefore a classic.  My favorite Christmas covers are Alternative Rock versions of a couple of classics.

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