Where Do You Give?

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 11.12.01 AM

Here on the center-right, we believe that the best and most interesting stuff in life happens without government. Every day people marry, raise families, work, start businesses, trade, and support their communities with neither help nor inducement from the state (though often with its hindrance). Though I argue that we don’t give the for-profit sector nearly enough credit for making our world as prosperous, happy, and moral as it is*, private charities can fill in the gaps where markets aren’t functioning properly.

So, to whom to you give and why?

My charity of choice for the last few years has been Cure International. Cure is a Christian medical charity that builds hospitals in some of the worst places on Earth, and focuses on relatively simple and inexpensive corrective surgeries such as clubfoot and cleft palates. It’s the sort of thing we take for granted in the West but that makes a tremendous difference in the developing world. They also have a very respectable rating from Charity Navigator.

I first heard about Cure through Dennis Prager — who runs an annual fundraiser for them — and you may recall that three of their doctors were murdered in Afghanistan earlier this year by a member of their security detail. It’s brave, useful, and wonderful work that helps people directly and represents our values abroad very well.

What other organizations deserve our money? And please, no ice buckets.

* Subject of a forthcoming post!

  1. TaleenaS

    Internationally:  Samaritan’s Purse,  Orphan Relief and Rescue
    Locally: Good Cheer (Soup kitchen and Food Bank), WI Animal Improvement (no kill shelter), my local church, and Gifts of the Heart (food bank) also various causes and kids programs locally.

    Both international groups do yeoman’s work in children’s lives.  Orphan Relief and Rescue’s workers are in Liberia and Benin (amidst the Ebola) stopping child trafficking.
    I think it is important that resources stay local too: people are more apt to hear you when you are making a difference in their lives.

  2. CandE

    We give to our church (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints), our school (BYU), Ronald McDonald House, and March of Dimes.  There are a few others to which we’ve given small, one-time amounts, but I forget what they are.

    Ronald McDonald House took a huge load off our shoulders by providing a place for us to stay when our newborn L had to be transferred from Tyler to Dallas.  The least we can do is pay it forward.

    Some good friends of ours had triplets a few years ago (all preemies), so March of Dimes is also close to our heart.

    -E

  3. PHCheese

    We give to Wings for Kids.org. It is a after school program that teaches social, emotional learning to underserved children. They have a four star, 93% rating on Charity Navigator.

  4. RushBabe49

    1. Hillsdale College.  We dropped our real alma maters to donate to Hillsdale.  They do God’s work there, educating the next generation.
    2. Seattle Chamber Music Society
    3. Curtis Institute of Music (the world’s best musicians pay zero tuition there)
    4. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  Their funding of research has resulted in medicines that address the root cause of this fairly-common genetic disease.
    5. Leukemia-Lymphoma Foundation
    6. American Friends of Yad Vashem

  5. Whiskey Sam

    My local church gets the bulk of it which in turn goes to support various missionaries and ministries like Samaritan’s Purse, Mercy Ministries, and Global Aid Network.  I give to some of those organizations privately, as well.  Voice of the Martyrs is another I personally support.  I donate to my niece and nephew each year for the bike-a-thons/walk-a-thons for heart and cancer charities.  In the past I helped fund the restoration of James Madison’s home, Montpelier, but they’ve completed most of that work.

  6. Albert Arthur

    Wounded Warriors & Animal Haven.

  7. Midget Faded Rattlesnake

    Barkha Herman:

    logo

     

    Yes, actually, we do (though obviously not under our Ricochet handles).  Other places, too, of course. There’s an embarrassment of worthy causes to choose from.

  8. RushBabe49

    Claire, check out the “heroes” post on the Member Feed, Sept. 21.

  9. Mark Wilson

    I give to the USO.  If there was ever a group of people to whom I owed a charitable donation, if that’s logically possible, it’s our deployed forces and combat veterans.

  10. John Walker

    Digger DTR mine clearance robot

    I support Digger DTR, a Swiss NGO which develops technological solutions for the humanitarian removal of land mines.  The principal products are robotic tanks with flails that explode anti-personnel mines in place.  Donations of any size are welcome, but are not tax-deductible for donors in the U.S.

    The main focus has been on removing anti-personnel mines, but below are tests which demonstrate the device is capable of withstanding the explosion of an anti-tank mine with up to 8 kg TNT equivalent.

  11. EThompson

    So, to whom to you give and why?

    I provide good jobs and I’m especially proud that my two favorite employees have earned enough money to help their parents pay for UCLA grad school sans federally funded student loans.

  12. HeartofAmerica

    I donate my time and money to Ronald McDonald House and occasionally to Christmas In October. I also donate (through my employer) to United Way and have done so for the last 35 years and to our local animal shelters with food and money. I’ve lost count of how many fundraisers for one organization or another that I’ve either donated to or raised money for over the years. Clothing and furniture go to Goodwill. We even donated a car once to some organization. My college occasionally gets a few bucks every now and then.
    Yesterday, I sent donations to The Parkinson’s Foundation and the National Federation of the Blind as part of my version of the ice bucket challenge.

  13. Tuck

    Institute for Justice

    “If you give a man a fish he is hungry again in an hour. If you teach him to catch a fish you do him a good turn.”

    IJ, among other things, removes licensing schemes that prevent people who know how to fish from fishing.  Thus allowing them to feed themselves.

    They have a very good track record of increasing our liberties.

  14. Douglas

    Mostly hunger and poverty stuff. My local food bank, along with a couple of national hunger programs.

  15. Pete EE

    1. Church
    2. World Vision
    3. Food for the Hungry
    #2 & 3 are child sponsorship programs. Unfortunately, I have always done a lousy job of making personal contact with my sponsored child.

  16. Lucy Pevensie

    Like Pete EE, my list begins with

    1. Church
    2. World Vision

    and then goes on to include

    3. the mission of  a friend to Japan
    4. my daughter’s Catholic school
    5. Samaritan’s Purse
    6. Catalyst Foundation, which works with communities in Vietnam
    7. Various small or in-kind contributions to local charities, including Durham Rescue Mission (for the homeless) and TROSA, a local substance abuse recovery program

    This list makes me very happy. I love to think about giving to these causes. 

  17. Lucy Pevensie

    EThompson:

    So, to whom to you give and why?

    I provide good jobs and I’m especially proud that my two favorite employees have earned enough money to help their parents pay for UCLA grad school sans federally funded student loans.

     I completely agree that providing good jobs is a huge contribution to society, and that business, inherently, is altruistic. But, as Arthur Brooks of AEI has shown, you are missing out on large benefits to yourself in happiness and health if you are not also giving to charity.

  18. EThompson

    Lucy Pevensie:

    EThompson:

    So, to whom to you give and why?

    I provide good jobs and I’m especially proud that my two favorite employees have earned enough money to help their parents pay for UCLA grad school sans federally funded student loans.

    I completely agree that providing good jobs is a huge contribution to society, and that business, inherently, is altruistic. But, as Arthur Brooks of AEI has shown, you are missing out on large benefits to yourself in happiness and health if you are not also giving to charity.

    Lucy, I contribute a 15% payroll tax and help young people avoid debilitating debt! What could possibly be a better investment?

Want to comment on stories like these? Become a member today!

You'll have access to:

  • All Ricochet articles, posts and podcasts.
  • The conversation amongst our members.
  • The opportunity share your Ricochet experiences.

Join Today!

Already a Member? Sign In