Why Women Talk More Than Men

Present company excluded, of course. From the story:

Ladies, do you ever get the feeling like you have a lot more to say than pretty much all of the men in your life? Well, according to a new study, that’s because you do. Actually, you have approximately 13,000 more words to say each day than your male counterparts.

The study cites higher levels of a language protein found in women’s brains when compared to men. It also asserts that girls learn to speak earlier than boys, lead…

  1. Percival
    katievs

    Scott Reusser: You know how men sometimes say or do inappropriate things? Like we laugh when we should be serious, or we grope when we should hug?

    Supposedly that’s caused by some sort of gene or protien, too. So let’s all just forgive and forget.   · 1 minute ago

    Wait.  Here you seem to suggest that our superior linguistic fluency is some sort of defect.  

    Shouldn’t we be more concerned about the protein deficit that is evidently interfering with men’s ability to communicate appropriately? · 4 hours ago

    Edited 4 hours ago

    Katie, where you see “superior linguistic fluency,” I see “inferior signal to noise ratio.”

    Probably just an engineer thing – never mind.

  2. TeamAmerica

    Seriously, it’s been noted that generally speaking, males talk to convey information, while females talk to nurture relationships. I read somewhere that when men and women talk, a pleasurable brain chemical is released (serotonin or dopamine?), but its effects are blocked in men’s brains by testosterone, since males are the family’s protectors and therefore need to be more guarded.

  3. Gretchen

    Language protein??? So it isn´t what they used to say–that we were vaccinated with a phonograph needle?

  4. Percival

    Once upon a time, when my then-girlfriend said “you never talk to me,” I responded “I was waiting for you to take a breath.”

    It’s nice to see the science finally backing that up.

  5. TalkGOP

    I remember seeing this exact same research result about 2 years ago. Thus proving that we continue to spend research $$ proving things we already know.

  6. Schrodinger

    Actually, studies have shown for years that women generally speak more words than men on a daily basis.

    This is the first study to ascribe this to a protein. It used to be ascribed to the cultural difference between women and men.

  7. Schrodinger

    I am curious how they know that this is a “language” protein?

    How do “language” proteins differ from other proteins?

    Has FOX been scammed?

  8. TalkGOP

    Language proteins are coded in iambic .pentameter

  9. Schrodinger

    Good news ladies! You have something in common with male rat pups.

     

    http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=128545&CultureCode=en

    The researchers extended their findings to humans in a preliminary study of Foxp2 protein in a small group of children. Unlike the rats, in which Foxp2 protein was elevated in males, they found that in humans, the girls had more of the Foxp2 protein in the cortex — a brain region associated with language — than age-matched boys.

    “At first glance, one might conclude that the findings in rats don’t generalize to humans, but the higher levels of Foxp2 expression are found in the more communicative sex in each species,” noted Cheryl Sisk, who studies sex differences at Michigan State University and was not involved with the study.

  10. Lord Humungus

    Mmmmhmmm.

  11. Barkha Herman

    I think the reason we talk so much is because you lot DON’T LISTEN!!!

  12. Salamandyr

    That ain’t the case in our house!

  13. Lord Humungus

    What’s that, Dearest?

  14. das_motorhead
    Schrodinger’s Cat: I am curious how they know that this is a “language” protein?

    How do “language” proteins differ from other proteins?

    Has FOX been scammed? · 17 minutes ago

    Yeah, poor oversimplification. Foxp2 is a transcription factor, so it’s important for the expression of other genes (300-400 of them, apparently). In this case, it functions mostly during development in the brain, lung, and intestinal tract. It’s heavily involved in regulating gene expression in the brain’s language center, and mutations in FoxP2 have been found in patients with speech disorders:

    This gene is required for proper development of speech and language regions of the brain during embryogenesis, and may be involved in a variety of biological pathways and cascades that may ultimately influence language development. Mutations in this gene cause speech-language disorder 1 (SPCH1), also known as autosomal dominant speech and language disorder with orofacial dyspraxia.

    And if that’s not enough technical rambling to kill the buzz around here. . .

  15. dash

    That’s right, blame it on the protein. It’s always the protein. Moleculists!

  16. das_motorhead
    das_motorhead 

    It’s heavily involved in regulating gene expression in the brain’s language center, and mutations in FoxP2 . . .

    On a related note, when we guys are able to get a word in edgewise, we usually come across as pretentious know-it-alls.

  17. Paul Dougherty

    This is heartening, if they can isolate the language protein, then a cure is bound to be just around the corner.

  18. Lord Humungus
    Paul Dougherty: This is heartening, if they can isolate the language protein, then a cure is bound to be just around the corner. · 20 minutes ago

    Just another disappointing reason to hate Obama-care.

  19. Severely Ltd.

    So their brains are all clogged up with protein. Should they be voting in that condition?

  20. Percival
    Barkha Herman: I think the reason we talk so much is because you lot DON’T LISTEN!!! · 1 hour ago

    Hehe…Barka, I used to sit and watch Cubs games with my grandfather.  One time, when his wife was on a tear about something or other, he waited until she had left the room, then put his pinkie in one ear and twisted, then repeated the procedure with his other pinkie in his other ear.

    He was turning down his hearing aids.  When he was done, he settled back into the easy chair with an expression of pure bliss.

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