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We Can Definitely Find Jimmy Hoffa

Well this is something:

A skeleton found beneath a Leicester car park has been confirmed as that of English king Richard III.

Experts from the University of Leicester said DNA from the bones matched that of descendants of the monarch’s family.

Lead archaeologist Richard Buckley, from the University of Leicester, told a press conference to applause: “Beyond reasonable doubt it’s Richard.”

R…

  1. Boisfeuras

    I had a hunch it was him…

  2. Israel P.

    Now the question is why did they bury him in a car park.

  3. Boisfeuras

    Because he had no horse?

  4. Tim H.

    I hope this shows up in today’s “Best of the Web” column, under the heading, “It’s always in the last place you look.”

  5. Tom Meyer, Ed.
    C

    This is so fantastically cool: after all these centuries, we finally have something concrete on Richard’s appearance!  Interesting that reality seems to have gone for the middle ground: Richard had scoliosis, but normal arms and no hunch.

  6. Hartmann von Aue

    A number of years ago a historian from the Royal Armouries told a tour group of academics my wife and I were with that they had Richard’s armor in their collection. It was pronouncedly malshaped on one side, which the speaker attributed in part to a spinal deformity but also to Richard’s fanatical practice as a dueller. The deformity combined with overdeveloping his musculature in his swordarm, shoulders and upper body explained, he thought, the descriptions of him having a “withered arm”. His non-sword arm just looked puny in comparison with the other.

  7. Foxman
    Tim H.: I hope this shows up in today’s “Best of the Web” column, under the heading, “It’s always in the last place you look.” · 5 hours ago

    Of course it’s always the last place you look.  Why would you continue looking after you found whatever you were looking for?

  8. ChrisZ

    I’m grateful for Hartmann’s anecdote. And I agree with Tom Meyer and She on the simply amazing quality of this discovery–as well as on the way “Daughter of Time” will make you a lifelong devotee of the quest for the real Richard.  The author, Josephine Tey, under the name Gordon Daviot, also wrote a play which could be considered the “anti-matter” version of Shakespeare’s “Richard III.”  It’s titled “Dickon,” after Richard Plantagenet’s boyhood nickname.

    I find myself quite touched by the thought that after half a millennium Richard has reappeared and may receive some measure of justice–and certainly burial in dignified and holy manner.

    And perhaps that scheming villain Henry Tudor will receive a comeuppance for making his slanders against Richard the foundation of his own reign, and the pretext for any evil he wished to inflict on his subjects.  I daresay he was the Obama of the 15th century!

  9. Charles Starnes

    Simply, headline of the year.

  10. She

    This fascinates me.  I’ve always thought that poor Richard (this one, not the other one) was badly done by.  My father introduced me to The Daughter of Time, probably when I was in high school, and I’ve sought out revisionist histories and novels ever since.  (If you’re not familiar with this book, and you look up the the link, ignore the fact that the Amazon book description asks, “Was King Henry III really a cruel murderer? Or was it political propaganda?”  It’s Richard that the book is about.)

     My favorite novel is probably Sharon Kaye Penman’s The Sunne in Splendour, which is one of a series of lengthy, detailed, and interesting tomes on the rather messy Plantagenet dynasty.

    Hooray for the nitpickers and fanatics who discovered this, did all the legwork, and found what might have been thought impossible to be true!

  11. Israel P.
    Tom Meyer: This is so fantastically cool: after all these centuries, we finally have something concrete on Richard’s appearance! 

    Concrete or asphalt. WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?

  12. Tom Meyer, Ed.
    C
    She:

    My father introduced me to The Daughter of Time, probably when I was in high school, and I’ve sought out revisionist histories and novels ever since.  (If you’re not familiar with this book, and you look up the the link, ignore the fact that the Amazon book description asks, “Was King Henry III really a cruel murderer? 

    Second this recommendation.

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