Take Note, Oh Blogosphere!

Andrew Sullivan basically admits to having been meep-meeped:

This was going to be the most transparent administration in history. It was going to roll back executive over-reach and put warfare against terrorism within a constitutional framework that could defend the country against Jihadist mass murder without sacrificing our values. And yet on a critical issue – the killing of allegedly treasonous citizens who have joined forces with al Qaeda to kill and threaten Americans – we were first given a memo that isn’t actually the real memo which contains no meaningful due process at all.

Now, the administration has given the Congress the actual memo, which, one hopes, does less damage to the Constitution and the English language. But why can “we the people” not see the actual memo? That phrase came up a lot in his recent Inaugural address. Funny how in practice in this respect, Obama is showing such contempt for the concept. And the “memo” Mike Isikoff procured is so legally shoddy and its corruption of the English language so perverse it almost demands we all see the real thing. To use the word “imminent” to describe something that is in the indefinite unknowable future is like calling torture “enhanced interrogation.” To lean on the word “infeasible” without any serious definition of what feasible would be is surreal. Underneath its absurd language and twisted rationales, the memo comes perilously close to the equivalent of “Because I said so.” And the core message of the policy is: trust me.

The entire passage screams “I’VE BEEN BETRAYED!” For all those who found Sullivan’s fawning worship of the president insufferable and nauseating, enjoy the schadenfreude.

  1. Crow

    If Andrew is serious about this, and not merely striking a pose so that he can refer back to it at some point to demonstrate that he’s a “serious person”, then this moment of shock and wonder should probably prompt a revaluation of the whole Obama administration.

    For, if Andrew took a moment and looked back across the last for years without the rose colored glasses on, he’d see with new eyes the NLRB appointments, the behavior of the Justice Department during Fast and Furious, the Benghazi affair and the cover-up that followed, the machinations behind the Libya intervention and the administration’s failure to go to Congress to authorize action, and at the whole host of Solyndra-esque “investments” this administration made, and he would realize that a pattern was emerging ( one that_is_common to all Progressive ideology)

    Unlike conservative supporters of executive prerogative in which, under the rarest occasion, the Executive acts where the law is silent or contrary to it to preserve the nation (a la Lincoln), Mr. Obama and pals tend to view the law as malleable: something to be obeyed scrupulously when it serves them, and ignored or circumvented if it does not.

  2. Fricosis Guy

    “Trust me” has worked well enough for every other bit of pablum Obama ladled out to his camp followers.

  3. Colin B Lane

    I guess this means that Andrew Sullivan has matriculated from useful idiot to useless idiot. Surely there’s a diploma for such events.

  4. KC Mulville

    It is tragic that a politician’s followers discover that they’ve been led astray by promises of hope …

    … oh who’s kidding who? Sullivan’s gullibility is hilarious.

  5. Crow
    KC Mulville: It is tragic that a politician’s followers discover that they’ve been led astray by promises of hope …

    … oh who’s kidding who? Sullivan’s gullibility is hilarious. · 19 minutes ago

    There’s no outrage like faux outrage/ it’s like no outrage I know

  6. Keith

    “No, Mr president. It is not our job to trust you; it is our duty to distrust you.”

    Sounds like a great 2nd Amendment argument to me.

  7. Demaratus

    Nous sommes trahis!

    Also: “And the core message of the policy is: trust me.”

    This is the essence of one of the defining features of Progressivism, which Jonah Goldberg has been arguing for years.

    Maybe cold reality will teach Sullivan to bone up on his intellectual history so he can better understand who Obama has been all along.

  8. Frederick Key

    This is one of the reasons why second terms are tough for presidents–because people who willingly turned a blind eye to their flaws to make sure they got reelected will have less compunction to do so now. But Lileks is right–they won’t go too hard  on Obama nor for too long, lest it taint the party the way the evil George Bush was used to taint the Republicans.

    Frank J. pointed out yesterday (http://www.imao.us/index.php/2013/02/reminder-all-the-lefts-outrage-is-faked-always/ – can’t seem to get the linky thing to work) that “All the left’s outrage is fake.”

    True. But sometimes it’s fun.

  9. Mr. Dart
    Frederick Key: This is one of the reasons why second terms are tough for presidents–because people who willingly turned a blind eye to their flaws to make sure they got reelected will have less compunction to do so now. 

    Apparently Obama isn’t the only one who can be more flexible after the election, eh Sully?

  10. James Lileks
    C

    well, the course of true love ne’er did run smooth. He’d vote for Obama for a third term, and tell us it was the truly Conservative thing to do. 

  11. Republic of Texas

     

    The entire passage screams “I’VE BEEN BETRAYED!” For all those who found Sullivan’s fawning worship of the president insufferable and nauseating, enjoy the schadenfreude. · · 13 hours ago

    I have certainly found Andrew Sullivan to be annoying and sometimes repugnant.  However, we should always make room for someone to be intellectually honest and change his views.  If Andrew’s eyes are beginning to open and he finally sees “The One” for what he truly is then we should avoid shadenfreude (however much it is a guilty pleasure ;).

    But if Crow’s Nest is correct and this is just a Sullivan Head Fake then Andrew would deserve all the scorn we can muster.

  12. David Williamson

    This is the same guy who thought Mrs Palin was stupid, right?

  13. Pejman Yousefzadeh
    C

    It’s fine and good to make room for someone who is intellectually honest to change his views. But when the attitude goes from FAWNING to BETRAYED, and when others have warned that this could happen, mockery is appropriate.

    Republic of Texas:  

    The entire passage screams “I’VE BEEN BETRAYED!” For all those who found Sullivan’s fawning worship of the president insufferable and nauseating, enjoy the schadenfreude. · · 13 hours ago

    I have certainly found Andrew Sullivan to be annoying and sometimes repugnant.  However, we should always make room for someone to be intellectually honest and change his views.  If Andrew’s eyes are beginning to open and he finally sees “The One” for what he truly is then we should avoid shadenfreude (however much it is a guilty pleasure ;).

    But if Crow’s Nest is correct and this is just a Sullivan Head Fake then Andrew would deserve all the scorn we can muster. · 0 minutes ago

  14. flownover

    I used to think much more highly of Mr Sullivan until he got the Bush Derangement Syndrome followed by the Palin Panicky Drooling. 

    He did introduce me to some great writers as his education was quite comprehensive in England. 

    But gosh he jumped the rails and crashed into the overpass with such abandon that I had forgotten to read him for years now. 

    This is a guy that has a deep streak of masochism, so don’t be surprised when you look towards his wail and see him smiling from the pain, the betrayal. The liberals took him out behind the shed awhile ago when he was more conservative and tried to take him down over his sexual proclivities . His response ? Well, let’s say he bucked them pretty hard.

    Now and again, I run into his older stuff, like today at aldaily.com and it makes me think “what a loss”.

    And then Howl comes to mind.

  15. James Lileks
    C

    It’s amusing and darkly satisfying when the acolytes suffer momentary undie-bundling over these things, but:  a pox on all their townhouses. I’d bet that many of the people who feel an odd sense of ethical dislocation over the President’s  smoke-’em-if-you-got-’em stance will eventually decide that Romney would have done the same, but would not have spent hours in moral agony as Obama surely did, wandering the lawn of the White House with his hands clasped behind his back, the furrow in his brow a soft, human,  perpendicular counterpoint to the famous crease of his trousers.

    Or maybe he was just going out for a Newport after the wife went to sleep. Point is, he’s smart; he’s one of the proper people. So this too shall pass. I mean, you can get upset about this sort of stuff, OR you can get on board with fundamentally transforming America. That’s a no-brainer. Literally.

  16. shelby_forthright

    I’d care if Sullivan wasn’t such a perfect waste of protoplasm.

  17. Pejman Yousefzadeh
    C

    And he insists on continuing to crash into the overpass to boot.

    flownover: I used to think much more highly of Mr Sullivan until he got the Bush Derangement Syndrome followed by the Palin Panicky Drooling. 

    He did introduce me to some great writers as his education was quite comprehensive in England. 

    But gosh he jumped the rails and crashed into the overpass with such abandon that I had forgotten to read him for years now. 

    This is a guy that has a deep streak of masochism, so don’t be surprised when you look towards his wail and see him smiling from the pain, the betrayal. The liberals took him out behind the shed awhile ago when he was more conservative and tried to take him down over his sexual proclivities . His response ? Well, let’s say he bucked them pretty hard.

    Now and again, I run into his older stuff, like today at aldaily.com and it makes me think “what a loss”.

    And then Howl comes to mind. · February 8, 2013 at 10:09am