Stop, Tumble, and Remember Your Past

In 1660, John Bunyan was arrested for preaching without a license.  He spent 12 years in prison, and was released following 1672′s Declaration of Indulgence; that declaration was reversed in 1673, and Bunyan spent another 6 months in prison, where he wrote the first part of The Pilgrim’s Progress.  I spoke with a client last week who had been stopped for driving with a blood alcohol level of .161, triggering the higher mandatory sentence for DUI in Washington State.  She told me that …

  1. sawatdeeka

    Forces in our society seem to want to do away with any kind of struggle or obstacles for themselves or for fellow citizens: no one should have to get a job that pays low wages, no one should have to work through college to pay the way; everything should be comfortable and easy.  Of course government services are the way to easing struggle.

    With the example of the insistence upon a living wage and great benefits in every job: where then will be the motivation to grow beyond the job and get more education and capitalize on one’s skills and potential?  I think people would just get comfortable where they are and not need to grow.

  2. Ryan M
    sawatdeeka: Forces in our society seem to want to do away with any kind of struggle or obstacles for themselves or for fellow citizens: no one should have to get a job that pays low wages, no one should have to work through college to pay the way; everything should be comfortable and easy.  Of course government services are the way to easing struggle.

    With the example of the insistence upon a living wage and great benefits in every job: where then will be the motivation to grow beyond the job and get more education and capitalize on one’s skills and potential?  I think people would just get comfortable where they are and not need to grow. · 24 minutes ago

    Russ Roberts recently had a guest who discussed that phenomenon (well, not exclusively).  Well worth the listen.

  3. Severely Ltd.

    I too have slipped on a waxed floor. If it’s the same wax manufacturer, do we have a shot at a class-action suit? After all, they probably have more money than your floor polisher.

    I worked with a couple of guys that were really pleased with the large settlements against the tobacco companies. When I protested how unfair it was to accuse the companies of hoodwinking the public over the threat of cancer when everyone has known of the dangers forever, they were willing to concede that everyone was aware of it (one was a smoker), but the companies were Big Business and they adertised. They couldn’t be convinced that free will trumps advertising.

  4. Ryan M
    Severely Ltd.: 

    They couldn’t be convinced that free will trumps advertising.

    Also part of the victimhood mentality, I think.  If you accept responsibility for your actions, then your ability to persevere through difficult situations (even ones that aren’t at all your own fault) is something you can own.  We don’t accept responsibility even for specific choices we make, anymore.  When you buy a product, you actually blame advertisers?

    I had an argument with a liberal one time who was talking about apple using blood … uh… glass, or something, in making the iPhone, and the need for regulation.  Or maybe it was the environment.  Anyway, I said the free market accounts for those “fair business practices” by allowing the consumer to determine what is important.  If you don’t like apple, you don’t buy their product, and maybe you let them know why.  Ultimately, it is the consumer who directs what the company does.  He replied that he doesn’t even need an iphone but the company tells him that he needs one – essentially, they’ve hoodwinked (as you said) him into buying something he doesn’t want, thus a failure of capitalism.  Ridiculous.

  5. Z in MT

    I am one of those unique persons that can’t claim victimhood.  It must mean I am just uncreative as my story is not incredible.

  6. D.C. McAllister
    C

    Well said. Our society’s inability to face hardship is a reflection of a spoiled and shallow generation. All children think they’re victims when their food falls off their tray or the kid down the street takes their ball. We’re an infantile society, and we’re paying the price.

  7. Leigh

    I always thought of a “victim” in the sense of a “victim of a crime” — someone who suffered harm (usually serious) because of the wrongdoing (not minor negligence) of another. 

    I guess that’s not how most people think nowadays.

  8. Ryan M
    Leigh: I always thought of a “victim” in the sense of a “victim of a crime” — someone who suffered harm (usually serious) because of the wrongdoing (not minor negligence) of another. 

    I guess that’s not how most people think nowadays. · 0 minutes ago

    Stop trying to minimize my victimhood, Leigh.

  9. Leigh
    Ryan M

    Leigh: I always thought of a “victim” in the sense of a “victim of a crime” — someone who suffered harm (usually serious) because of the wrongdoing (not minor negligence) of another. 

    I guess that’s not how most people think nowadays. · 0 minutes ago

    Stop trying to minimize my victimhood, Leigh. · 1 hour ago

    If not, does that make you a victim of my strict definitionism?

  10. Ryan M
    Leigh

    Ryan M

    Leigh: I always thought of a “victim” in the sense of a “victim of a crime” — someone who suffered harm (usually serious) because of the wrongdoing (not minor negligence) of another. 

    I guess that’s not how most people think nowadays. · 0 minutes ago

    Stop trying to minimize my victimhood, Leigh. · 1 hour ago

    If not, does that make you a victim of my strict definitionism? · 0 minutes ago

    Everyone’s a victim!  Even if you’re only a victim of not being included on my long list of victims.  :)

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