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Santa Claus Is Still Coming To This Town

During the hustle and bustle of this holiday season, my kids make me think about how much I cherish this time of year. Before our kids came into our lives, the holidays were important, but also a respite from the hectic work pace. Now, our kids make it all the more worthwhile.

Yesterday, my five-year-old son wanted to know if it was possible to call Santa Claus. I responded that I usually e-mailed him because Santa and the elves were so busy this time of year. My eight-year-old daughter chimed in, “Well, we probably need to call the corporate number and leave a message.”

I am thrilled that both of my kids still believe in Santa Claus and the thought of ending these conversations makes me a little sad. It also prompted me to do a bit of research, which revealed that the average age that kids stop believing in good ole St. Nick is usually between 8- 10 years.

We are on the cusp. I know that my daughter has these conversations at school, especially with kids with older siblings. If my daughter suspects Santa is not real, she is not letting on to her parents or little brother. I know some parents maintain that perpetuating the Santa myth is akin to lying to their children; others maintain that the holidays focus too much on consumerism. I agree that there is definitely some of the latter.

There are numerous other politically correct reasons people love to bash the Santa myth and find it harmful to children. I say, to each his own. The beauty of America is that we embrace many choices.

For our family, we want to enjoy the magical and exciting world of Santa Claus that we have helped create for our children. Sure, Santa may not really exist, but believing in him for a few years of a hopefully long life is a lot of fun for our family, especially the parents!

Santa-on-the-run image via Shutterstock.

  1. ConservativeWanderer

    Even the mature, dependable adults of NORAD help with the Santa myth.

    Check out the NORAD Tracks Santa website… and let your kids follow him around the world on Christmas Eve.

  2. Mollie Hemingway

    So I grew up without the Santa story and I never missed it for a moment. It just was not part of my culture. I told my daughters that Santa was just a fun story and they refuse to believe me. When St. Nicholas visited my oldest daughter’s school on the Feast of St. Nicholas (Dec. 6), she came home and explained to me, “Mom! Mom! Santa is real. I met him.”

    So I’m just taking a strict neutrality approach to the issue. I don’t say he’s not real. I don’t say he’s real. But he does give the kids a lot of joy to dream about and I think that’s a great part of childhood.

  3. ConservativeWanderer
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: So I grew up without the Santa story and I never missed it for a moment. It just was not part of my culture. I told my daughters that Santa was just a fun story and they refuse to believe me. When St. Nicholas visited my oldest daughter’s school on the Feast of St. Nicholas (Dec. 6), she came home and explained to me, “Mom! Mom! Santa is real. I met him.”

    So I’m just taking a strict neutrality approach to the issue. I don’t say he’s not real. I don’t say he’s real. But he does give the kids a lot of joy to dream about and I think that’s a great part of childhood. · 0 minutes ago

    Come on, Mollie, if Santa isn’t real, how does NORAD track him every year? ;)

  4. Mike McConnaughey

    My oldest son is 21 and has Down Syndrome.  Part of the joy he brings to our home is his complete joy about Santa and Christmas 365 days a year.  We have Christmas movies and music all the time.  His brothers (16, 19) used to hate it, but as they have gotten older they have embraced their ‘big’ brother’s love of Santa.  We put him to bed by 10pm on 12/24 so Santa can pick him up and he helps Santa in Colorado.  

    One of my great joys is asking him on Christmas morning if he worked hard helping Santa.  His reply is “yes, busy!”

  5. Pilli

    A friend told me, “You never know when is the last time you’ll read ‘Good Night Moon’ to your kids.”  Cherish every moment.  They will become aware of the ‘world’ soon enough.

  6. Casey

    Santa is real.  Santa is me.

    Santa is that part of our human soul that is purely good, purely unselfish, purely love.  The Santa character, the Santa myth, is a gift of that part of us to our children.

    Certainly that gift is always there.  It is there when we make them brush their teeth and it is there when we make them eat their peas.  But their young minds cannot see that love.

    The Santa story is not a lie.  It is a demonstration.  An illustration.

    On Christmas eve night, I will sit alone in a room warmed only by the lights on my tree.  And I will think of Santa.  And I will think of my father.  And I will feel the depth of the love he felt for me.

    And on Christmas morning I will demonstrate the depth of my love for his grandchildren.

    They ought to believe.  Santa is real.

  7. ConservativeWanderer

    By the way, Cherylyn, it’s been fun having you around… perhaps you could stick around for a while longer? :)

  8. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: So I grew up without the Santa story and I never missed it for a moment. It just was not part of my culture. I told my daughters that Santa was just a fun story and they refuse to believe me. When St. Nicholas visited my oldest daughter’s school on the Feast of St. Nicholas (Dec. 6), she came home and explained to me, “Mom! Mom! Santa is real. I met him.”

    So I’m just taking a strict neutrality approach to the issue. I don’t say he’s not real. I don’t say he’s real. But he does give the kids a lot of joy to dream about and I think that’s a great part of childhood. · 1 hour ago

  9. Vald the Misspeller
    ConservativeWanderer: Even the mature, dependable adults of NORAD help with the Santa myth.

    Wait, what? Santa a myth? I suppose next you’ll be telling me Obama’s not really a White Sox fan. I’m leaving out milk and cookies anyway – whatever the jolly old elf doesn’t take, the Cornish pixies can have.
  10. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C

    Yes, Mollie – Santa does give the kids a lot of joy to dream about him and isn’t that the best part??

  11. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C
    ConservativeWanderer: Even the mature, dependable adults of NORAD help with the Santa myth.

    Check out the NORAD Tracks Santa website… and let your kids follow him around the world on Christmas Eve. · 1 hour ago

    LOVE Norad. We spend a good part of the evening on the 24th tracking Santa’s whereabouts. It’s also a good geography lesson too!

  12. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C

    Love this Mike and bless you and your family. Thank you for sharing.

    Mike McConnaughey: My oldest son is 21 and has Down Syndrome.  Part of the joy he brings to our home is his complete joy about Santa and Christmas 365 days a year.  We have Christmas movies and music all the time.  His brothers (16, 19) used to hate it, but as they have gotten older they have embraced their ‘big’ brother’s love of Santa.  We put him to bed by 10pm on 12/24 so Santa can pick him up and he helps Santa in Colorado.  

    One of my great joys is asking him on Christmas morning if he worked hard helping Santa.  His reply is “yes, busy!” · 1 hour ago

  13. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C
    Pilli: A friend told me, “You never know when is the last time you’ll read ‘Good Night Moon’ to your kids.”  Cherish every moment.  They will become aware of the ‘world’ soon enough. · 1 hour ago

    Well said. Thank you.

  14. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C

    Tis the season. Cornish pixies are deserving as well.

    Vald the Misspeller

    ConservativeWanderer: Even the mature, dependable adults of NORAD help with the Santa myth.

    Wait, what? Santa a myth? I suppose next you’ll be telling me Obama’s not really a White Sox fan. I’m leaving out milk and cookies anyway – whatever the jolly old elf doesn’t take, the Cornish pixies can have. · 11 minutes ago

  15. Cherylyn LeBon, Guest Contributor
    C
    ConservativeWanderer: By the way, Cherylyn, it’s been fun having you around… perhaps you could stick around for a while longer? :) · 24 minutes ago

    Thank you very much and for all of your comments and conversation.