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Programming Note: Special Immigration Podcast Today at 12PM PT

Ricochet members, please join us today at 12PM PT/3PM ET for a live recording of a special podcast solely devoted to immigration. Our panelists: Mickey Kaus (Charles Krauthammer observed recently that Mickey was “doing the best writing in the country” on the topic), Mark Krikorian, James Pethokoukis, and Josh Treviño. We will be taking questions from the chat room during the show, so come prepared. 

The podcast will be available for download later in the day for those who can’t make the live recording. 

  1. Aaron Miller

    9. How can we ensure cultural assimilation as opposed to cultural substitution?

    I could go on, I think, but it will have to wait until morning. Good night, y’all.

  2. Tom Roberts

    Question for the panel: how about this for an amnesty. Suspend the 3 and 10 years bars to re-entry for anyone who leaves within, say, a six month period, and allow them to re-apply for admission from outside the US ?

    Leaving aside the question of how well it would be enforced, I think it would have several advantages. 

    It would then be harder to argue against tougher enforcement and applying pressure on illegals to self-deport (“look, they had a chance for six months to get right with the law and didn’t take it. Tough luck”).

    It would also remove the incentive to stay once someone was in the country illegally. My view is that a seasonal worker, for example, who comes and goes is less likely to be a welfare burden than one who stays permanently and brings his family with him.

    With that in mind, have the penalties for illegal presence introduced in 1996 (3yr, 10yr and lifetime bars) turned out to be counter productive ?

  3. Butters

    Why is it so easy to enter the country illegally and so difficult to immigrate legally? Shouldn’t it be the exact opposite? Why can’t someone be processed in a few weeks rather than months or years? Does anything being proposed change this dynamic?

  4. Astonishing

    What’s the over/under on how many times the podcasters mention “Amnesty!”?

    (My bet is 42 times per hour.)

    This podcast will be like Budyonny explaining the Battle of Warsaw.

    The train for the immigration debate already left the station, and these fellows, with the possible exceptions of Treviño and Pethokoukis, missed it. They were run over by it. Of course, they might succeed in getting Rubio to jump off the train and cripple himself in the fall, . . . if you want to call that success.

    (The 2016 Cruz versus Rubio competition could be veddy interesting.)

  5. Astonishing
    Aaron Miller ·

    Reagan granted amnesty without closing the border (though he wished he could). Did that endear him with hispanic voters? If not, why should current Republicans expect a more favorable response?

    1. Doesn’t “a path to citizenship” for illegals encourage others to enter the country illegally, expecting similar treatment?

    2.  . . .  We don’t set thieves free when we discover they are parents.
    3. What do y’all think of Victor Davis Hanson’s many articles on this subject and his immigration-related experiences in southern California?
    4. How do you suggest Congress should determine the number of immigration openings for each country? Or should such limits be abolished?
    5. . . . Would you not expect even a person in desperate need to knock and request entry into your home, unless that need is safety fromimminentdanger? Should American citizens completely ignore this violation of hospitality?
    6.  . . .  do they not often bring with them a big government mentality?
    7.  . . .

    With the exception of number 4, these aren’t questions. Rhetorical questions aren’t questions.

    Or as my best teacher used to say, “Are you asking a question or making a speech.”

    (It’s fine to make a speech. But don’t pretend it’s a question.)

  6. Aaron Miller
    1. Reagan granted amnesty without closing the border (though he wished he could). Did that endear him with hispanic voters? If not, why should current Republicans expect a more favorable response?

    2. Doesn’t “a path to citizenship” for illegals encourage others to enter the country illegally, expecting similar treatment?
    3. Why should the children of illegal immigrants be treated differently than the children of any other criminals? We don’t set thieves free when we discover they are parents.
    4. What do y’all think of Victor Davis Hanson’s many articles on this subject and his immigration-related experiences in southern California?
    5. How do you suggest Congress should determine the number of immigration openings for each country? Or should such limits be abolished?
    6. How is America similar or not similar to a person’s home? Would you not expect even a person in desperate need to knock and request entry into your home, unless that need is safety from imminent danger? Should American citizens completely ignore this violation of hospitality?
    7. Despite the frequency of entrepreneurship among poor hispanic immigrants, do they not often bring with them a big government mentality?
    8. How are past waves of American immigration same/different from now?
  7. Aaron Miller

    They are indeed questions because they invite responses to specific issues. Not every question must be answered with yes, no, or facts alone.

    How a question should be phrased depends on the context. If you are posing a question to a reporter or politician on TV, keep it brief and very precise. In the case of this podcast, the goal is a dynamic discussion. So talking points are a fair beginning.

    Does it bother you that I began my first question with “Doesn’t” instead of “Does”? Regardless of how I phrased the question, my own answer could probably be guessed.

    Anyway, the podcast crew can rephrase my rhetoric however they want, provided they are fair.

  8. Sweezle

    Aaron – From Pew Research

    –1980 Jimmy Carter, 56% Ronald Reagan, 35% +21

    –1984 Walter Mondale, 61% Ronald Reagan, 37% +24

    1986 Reagan signed Amnesty Bill

    –1988 Michael Dukakis, 69% George H.W. Bush, 30% +39

    –1992 Bill Clinton, 61% George H.W. Bush, 25% +36

    –1996 Bill Clinton, 72% Bob Dole, 21% +51

    –2000 Al Gore, 62% George W. Bush, 35% +27

    –2004 John Kerry, 58% George W. Bush, 40% +18

    –2008 Barack Obama, 67% John McCain, 31% +36

    –2012 Barack Obama, 71% Mitt Romney, 27% +44

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