Nikki Haley Slams Obama

Obama’s National Labor Relations Board did something amazing.  It asked a judge to order Boeing, the nation’s largest (and last) major aircraft manufacturer, to stop its plans to move some operations to South Carolina.

That’s right: the Obama administration demanded that a private company cease operating like a private company.  

Boeing wants to move its manufacturing operations for the 787 to South Carolina, which is a right-to-work state.  That’s the whole point of having right-to-work states — they’re a lot more attractive to manufacturers, a lot more efficient, and, it turns out, a lot better for workers.

Here’s former Tennessee governor (now senator) Lamar Alexander in the WSJ:

 In 1985, General Motors located its $5 billion Saturn plant in Spring Hill, Tenn., 40 miles from Nissan, hoping side-by-side competition would help the Americans beat the Japanese. After 25 years, nonunion Nissan operated the most efficient auto plant in North America. The Saturn/UAW partnership never made a profit. GM closed Saturn last year.

Nissan’s success is one reason why Volkswagen recently located in Chattanooga, and why Honda, Toyota, BMW, Kia, Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai and thousands of suppliers have chosen southeastern right-to-work states for their plants. Under right-to-work laws, employees may join unions, but mostly they have declined. Three times workers at the Nissan plant in Smyrna, Tenn., rejected organizing themselves like Saturn employees a few miles away.

He’s right.  And now sitting Republican governors are hitting back.  From Fox News:

Nine state attorneys general sounded off in a letter to the National Labor Relations Board, calling a complaint it filed against Boeing for opening a production facility in South Carolina an assault on their states’ economies.

“This complaint represents an assault upon the constitutional right of free speech, and the ability of our states to create jobs and recruit industry. Your ill-conceived retaliatory action seeks to destroy our citizens’ right to work,” the letter from the attorneys general reads.

Some have called the NLRB action unprecedented, and South Carolina officials have expressed anger and fear that it could stymie growth. Attorneys general from Virginia, Nebraska, Texas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Arizona and Oklahoma joined South Carolina attorney general Alan Wilson in signing Thursday’s letter to voice their concerns that NLRB interference could hinder economic growth in their states too.

“Our states are struggling to emerge from one of the worst economic collapses since the Depression. Your complaint further impairs an economic recovery,” the letter says. “Intrusion by the federal bureaucracy on behalf of unions will not create a single new job or put one unemployed person back to work.”

Now Nikki Haley, governor of South Carolina, gives a full-throated push-back in today’s WSJ:

The actions by the NLRB are nothing less than a direct assault on the 22 right-to-work states across America. They are also an unprecedented attack on an iconic American company that is being told by the federal government—which seems to regard its authority as endless—where and how to build airplanes.

The president has been silent since his hand-selected NLRB General Counsel Lafe Solomon, who has not yet been confirmed by the United States Senate as required by law, chose to engage in economic warfare on behalf of the unions last week.

While silence in this case can be assumed to mean consent, President Obama’s silence is not acceptable—not to me, and certainly not to the millions of South Carolinians who are rightly aghast at the thought of the greatest economic development success our state has seen in decades being ripped away by federal bureaucrats who appear to be little more than union puppets.

That’s just the right tone: outrage, scorched earth, refusal to compromise.  That’s what this president and this administration deserves.  When I think of the Republican governors and congressmen on the front lines — Nikki Haley, Scott Walker, Paul Ryan, Mitch Daniels, Chris Christie — I’m getting a clearer, sharper picture about the coming presidential campaign.  It should be personal, principled, and perpetually on offense.  And it should be led by a sitting, elected Republican officeholder.  They’re the ones with the fire.

  1. KC Mulville

    “That’s what this president and this administration deserves.” Agreed.

    We’ve become so accustomed to the Left’s aggressive, uncompromising, take-a-mile attitude that we don’t appreciate the aggressiveness anymore. They’re all take and no give. Does anyone forget how Obamacare was passed, with that reconciliation nonsense? They wail and bemoan to the media, yet the moment they can screw opponents, they relish the exercise. 

    It’s one thing to oppose a Keynesian ideology, or some foreign policy theory. But the Left practices a method of politics which needs to be stopped before anything else. They depend on the media to hide their aggressive, hostile, and frequently lying brand of politics. Then they have the gall to whine about a civil tone.

    You have to stand up to bullies. 

  2. Mel Foil

    Even when I was a little kid, I hated pro-union puppets. They’re scary. Especially when they work for the federal government.

  3. Kervinlee

    We need more of this – loud and long, a fire-bell in the night. Let the opposition push back as hard as they can – this is an existential battle for the American way of freedom and should be fought like one. Go Nikki Haley!

  4. John Walker
    Rob Long: Boeing wants to move its manufacturing operations for the 787 to South Carolina, which is a right-to-work state.

    One quibble: Boeing does not seek to move its manufacturing of the 787 to South Carolina, but rather to open a new facility there to expand their manufacturing capacity of that aircraft.  Under the current plan, seven 787s per month will be produced in Everett, Washington and three in South Carolina by 2013.  Boeing has, in fact, hired 2000 new union machinists in the Puget Sound area since announcing the expansion in South Carolina in 2009.  (Source, Aviation Week & Space Technology, April 25, 2011, p. 38.)

  5. Kervinlee
    Kervinlee: We need more of this – loud and long, a fire-bell in the night. Let the opposition push back as hard as they can – this is an existential battle for the American way of freedom and should be fought like one. Go Nikki Haley! · Apr 29 at 11:27am

    I meant to say “we in the opposition.”

  6. Spin

    John’s point is absolutely correct, and shouldn’t be missed.  Boeing is not trying to escape union labor with the factory in South Carolina.  This is about increased production capacity as well as ensuring business continuity.  But those kinds of things are lost on people who don’t understand private enterprise.

  7. Sisyphus

    This is the heavy handed “industrial policy” of European tyrants and third world strong men. The NLRB is putting American industry on notice that they are its subject instruments, and the 22 right-to-work states that their “secession” from the union movement will not be tolerated.

    My interpretation is that the NLRB is formally requesting its own dissolution, a request that I look forward to seeing met by this month in 2013.

  8. John Marzan
    Rob Long:

    That’s just the right tone: outrage, scorched earth, refusal to compromise.  That’s what this president and this administration deserves.  When I think of the Republican governors and congressmen on the front lines — Nikki Haley, Scott Walker, Paul Ryan, Mitch Daniels, Chris Christie — I’m getting a clearer, sharper picture about the coming presidential campaign.  It should be personal, principled, and perpetually on offense.  And it should be led by a sitting, elected Republican officeholder.  They’re the ones with the fire.

    ·

    I’m so happy Gov Nikki took my advice.

  9. JohnBoy

    After reading Jonah Goldberg’s “Liberal Fascism” I see the parallel of this administration to certain Western European governments of the last century.

    Nikki Haley and Boeing should ignore all the fumings that come from Washington and double its efforts and speed to build the plant.

    Here’s another idea: Build the plant on the Fort Sumter site and see if Obama will come and fire on it.

  10. Dan Holmes
    Rob Long: … When I think of the Republican governors and congressmen on the front lines — Nikki Haley, Scott Walker, Paul Ryan, Mitch Daniels, Chris Christie — I’m getting a clearer, sharper picture about the coming presidential campaign.  It should be personal, principled, and perpetually on offense.  And it should be led by a sitting, elected Republican officeholder.  They’re the ones with the fire.

    ·

    They are also the ones with (often direct) experience dealing with the Obama Regime (which could have given them some fire), and the sitting governors also have executive experience.  Both of these types of experience give these potential candidates, dare I say it, gravitas.

  11. concerned citizen

    Bravo, bravo to Gov. Nikki Haley and those Attorneys General!  This is what America is about.  The president and his people are not royalty who declare edicts from their thrones to which everyone must meekly submit.  Our current president and his people seem to have forgotten that…

    When I think of the Republican governors and congressmen on the front lines — Nikki Haley, Scott Walker, Paul Ryan, Mitch Daniels, Chris Christie — I’m getting a clearer, sharper picture about the coming presidential campaign.  It should be personal, principled, and perpetually on offense.  And it should be led by a sitting, elected Republican officeholder.  They’re the ones with the fire.

    Yes.  This is an excellent point that needs to be emphasized.  No “former governors” or “former Congressmen” please.

  12. Mitch Strand

    Nikki Haley’s broadside makes a staid Midwesterner like me want to leap up and shout, “Amen!” It doesn’t matter what Boeing’s plans are, expansion or otherwise. The NLRB has no business saying a word about it.

    What this definitively shows is that unions have less interest in workers getting jobs than union workers paying dues.