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Mitt to Explain Himself at Last?

Two items.  The first, from today’s Wall Street Journal:

The ObamaCare preview that Massachusetts has been conducting for the last several years grows more ominous by the month….

A new survey released yesterday by the Massachusetts Medical Society reveals that fewer than half of the state’s primary care practices are accepting new patients, down from 70% in 2007, before former Governor Mitt Romney’s health-care plan came online. The average wait time for a routine checkup with an internist is 48 days. It takes 43 days to secure an appointment with a gastroenterologist for chronic heartburn, up from 36 last year, and 41 days to see an OB/GYN, up from 34 last year.

The second, from Time magazine:

Romney to give major health care address Thursday in Michigan.

Complete with PowerPoint presentation, frontrunner will “lay out plan to repeal and replace Obamacare.”

This should be interesting.

  1. anon_academic

    Why am I thinking of the sentence, “I could no more abandon this [crazy hate-filled hypocritical] man who brought me into the church than I could my own racist grandmother [who btw, raised me]”  ?

  2. r r

    Goodness gracious… I just don’t see why Professor Rahe is so optimistic….

  3. Xennady

    Wait what?

    He’s got a powerpoint presentation?

    Oh. It’s all over. He’s going to be the GOP nominee.

    What can overcome a powerpoint presentation?

    Surely not any measly facts.

  4. Bill Whalen
    C

    Fox News had a particularly brutal piece on Romneycare over the weekend — doctors becoming scarce in Massachusetts. In other words, the British lost the (Revolutionary) War, but they got their healthcare system.

    So . . . will Mitt offer a mea culpa for the Massachusetts plan, or continue with the “states are the laboratory of democracy” defense?

    Why give this speech in Michigan — do it instead in DC, since this is for the national media’s consumption. If I were in Mitt’s camp, I’d think of reserving the Wolverine State (a special state for him, given his family history) for a speech devoted solely to a futuristic economic vision.

  5. Diane Ellis
    C

    Here’s what I’d like to see Romney say:

    I am, and have long been, a proponent of Federalism.  Federalism is the idea that each of the great states in the Union should have the power and freedom to implement policies that serve the specific needs and desires of their residents.  Federalism puts great responsibility on the shoulders of state governments to spend their tax dollars wisely, and it offers a mechanism by which these state governments are held accountable: if the residents of a state don’t see their needs and concerns addressed, they can hold elections, propose initiatives, and if all else fails, relocate to a state that better represents their preferences.  Federalism also benefits the nation as a whole because it creates a system by which Americans have fifty laboratories in which to conduct policy experiments.  If a policy like Scott Walker’s ending of collective bargaining for public sector unions proves itself to be a success, as I believe it will, the success is there for every other state to see and hopefully emulate. If a policy such as the health legislation I enacted while governor of Massachusetts turns out to be a resounding failure, it should be seen as a valuable teaching moment for the rest of the country.  As the Republican nominee, and as President of the United States, I would work to restore power and freedom to the states so that they could work toward better serving their residents.  An integral part of this mission would be the repeal of ObamaCare, which from Massachusetts’ experience, I know will be a resounding failure.

  6. Frozen Chosen

    His healthcare address Thursday could make or break his campaign…or not.

    Many people (some of whom are on this site) have already said categorically that they will not support Mitt because of Romneycare.  Will he be able to say anything to change those minds?  Probably not, but he can change the views of folks who may be a little less adamant in their views.

    At any rate, hopefully his address will make his candidacy a little more palatable to people on our side since his nomination is more or less inevitable…

  7. Peter Robinson
    C
    Bill Whalen: So . . . will Mitt offer a mea culpa for the Massachusetts plan, or continue with the “states are the laboratory of democracy” defense?

    Edited on May 10 at 11:22 am

    Which are you predicting, Bill?  (My feeling:  If he were going to put some distance between himself and RomneyCare, he’d have done so already.  Heck.  I wrote a column more or less begging him to do just that–two years ago.  He just plain won’t do it.)

  8. Frozen Chosen
    Diane Ellis, Ed.: Here’s what I’d like to see Romney say:

     

    Diane,

    Perhaps he could replace the phrase, “resounding failure” with “less than completely successful”.  Might soften the blow a bit…

  9. Cas Balicki

    Canada’s Fraser Institute, a policy think tank, has been studying this question of wait times for years. Here is one recent article:

    Surgical wait times jump to 18.2 weeks, second longest ever as all provinces record greater delays for treatment

    Contained within this particular article is a link to the Fraser Institute’s 20th annual report on the subject: Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada. The entire report is available as a free download. I’ve included the second link for the convenience of Ricochet readers who want to go directly to the full report.

  10. Pseudodionysius

    Not even a Navy Seal Team can save Romney from the millstone that he has created around his own neck.

  11. Israel P.
    Diane Ellis, Ed.: If a policy such as the health legislation I enacted while governor of Massachusetts turns out to be a resounding failure, it should be seen as a valuable teaching moment for the rest of the country. 

    Republican presidential nominees don’t say “teaching moment.”

  12. Louie Mungaray (Squishy Blue RINO)

    Which are you predicting, Bill?  (My feeling:  If he were going to put some distance between himself and RomneyCare, he’d have done so already.  Heck.  I wrote a column more or less begging him to do just that–two years ago.  He just plain won’t do it.)

    That picture is worth a thousand words. The guy is bending over backwards and tying himself in to knots, yet his noggin remains perilously close to his own glutes.

    So many CoC violations, so little time.

  13. Bill Whalen
    C

    Peter, I don’t think he’ll ever own up to Romneycare’s problems. I think you’re right: The window’s closed.

    To do so now would cause two problems, imo:

    1) Raises questions as to Romney’s core convictions (abortion, etc.)

    2) Reporters will see it as an inivitation to revisit the rest of his Massachusetts record. Poison, for a former governor.

    Peter Robinson

    Bill Whalen: So . . . will Mitt offer a mea culpa for the Massachusetts plan, or continue with the “states are the laboratory of democracy” defense?

    Edited on May 10 at 11:22 am

    Which are you predicting, Bill?  (My feeling:  If he were going to put some distance between himself and RomneyCare, he’d have done so already.  Heck.  I wrote a column more or less begging him to do just that–two years ago.  He just plain won’t do it.) · May 10 at 11:27am

  14. dittoheadadt
    Frozen Chosen: Many people (some of whom are on this site) have already said categorically that they will not support Mitt because of Romneycare.  Will he be able to say anything to change those minds? · May 10 at 11:23am

    As one of the people described in your first sentence quoted above, I can answer your second sentence quoted above: if he cribs Diane’s quote exactly and entirely, he’s back in play in my book.

  15. dittoheadadt
    Frozen Chosen

    Diane Ellis, Ed.: Here’s what I’d like to see Romney say:

    Diane,

    Perhaps he could replace the phrase, “resounding failure” with “less than completely successful”.  Might soften the blow a bit… · May 10 at 11:29am

    “Less than completely successful??”  ALL legislation is “less than completely successful.”  He says something that squishy, he’s back OUT of play in my book.

  16. Frozen Chosen
    dittoheadadt

    Frozen Chosen: Many people (some of whom are on this site) have already said categorically that they will not support Mitt because of Romneycare.  Will he be able to say anything to change those minds? · May 10 at 11:23am

    As one of the people described in your first sentence quoted above, I can answer your second sentence quoted above: if he cribs Diane’s quote exactly and entirely, he’s back in play in my book. · May 10 at 2:06pm

    He may be back in your play for you if he said those exact words but he would be out of play for many, many others…

  17. Paul A. Rahe
    C
    Samwise Gamgee: Goodness gracious… I just don’t see why Professor Rahe is so optimistic…. · May 10 at 10:59am

    Because Mitt is history, as soon will be evident.

  18. Paul A. Rahe
    C
    Diane Ellis, Ed.: Here’s what I’d like to see Romney say:

    I am, and have long been, a proponent of Federalism.. . .

    Edited on May 10 at 11:22 am May 10 at 11:21am

    Not good enough. We will still want to ask, “OK, what light does your conduct as governor throw on your likely conduct as President?”

    Ask that question, and he’s a goner.

  19. Peter Robinson
    C
    Paul A. Rahe

    Diane Ellis, Ed.: Here’s what I’d like to see Romney say:

    I am, and have long been, a proponent of Federalism.. . .

    Edited on May 10 at 11:22 am

    May 10 at 11:21am

    Not good enough. We will still want to ask, “OK, what light does your conduct as governor throw on your likely conduct as President?”

    Ask that question, and he’s a goner. · May 10 at 3:53pm

    If only for the intellectual calisthenics the question involves, let me ask you this, Paul:  Is there anything–anything at all–that Mitt could say that would enable him to get past RomneyCare, establishing himself as a credible candidate?

  20. Ken Sweeney
    Peter Robinson

     

    If only for the intellectual calisthenics the question involves, let me ask you this, Paul:  Is there anything–anything at all–that Mitt could say that would enable him to get past RomneyCare, establishing himself as a credible candidate? · May 10 at 4:03pm

    He must renounce RomneyCare as a failed experiment.  No weasel words or escape clauses.  Romney must also explain the lesson from this failure–that technocratic bureaucracies cannot solve problems, only empowered individuals with the tools and flexibility to fashion their own destiny can help this nation recover.

    Romney has always been a technocratic business manager, a prettier version of Indiana’s Mitch Daniels.  But today’s battles are not over managerial competence, but rather a fundamental vision for the country, the Democrat vision of being governed my self-appointed experts, or governed by a free people that Reagan and the Tea Party champion.