Is Elizabeth Warren the First Female Native American Senator?

If I have this right, then Elizabeth Warren is the first female Native American senator. Surely this is something to be celebrated! Is the press appropriately acknowledging this breakthrough? Surely we can congratulate her on this, since it is an historic milestone indeed. I say this with no animosity. Since we’ve been beaten, isn’t it time to recognize the winning party for their achievements?

  1. Cunctator

    Whoops sorry to self comment, but I think a very large petition for a statue or plaque would be very helpful at this time.

  2. Man With the Axe

    I love this suggestion!

  3. OSweet

    A good and effective prank would be for some DC-area Tea Partiers to dress up as native Americans and stage a celebratory rally outside the Capitol to mark the historic event. Ideally Tea Partiers with prominent cheekbones. Make it maximally conspicuous to attract maximal press attention, and try to get the real Cherokee Nation leaders to comment.

  4. 10 cents

    All I can say in lighthearted fun is,

    “How

  5. Joan of Ark La Tex

    I demand the Media cover this story. They are racist for not covering it. 

  6. William Laing

    This is a great idea.

  7. jonsouth

    The Democrats are so hip and progressive they’re totally over the whole racial thing, man. Except when they need to hype it to get into positions of power.

  8. Steven Jones

    Elizabeth Warren is the first self-described woman native American senator.

  9. Cunctator

    Exactly Steven Jones!  I’m willing to put my money where my typing is – I’ll chip in $50 towards a prominently displayed memorial (eg bronze plaque) at the Harvard Law School.  Perhaps other members at this site can co-contribute (in principal, at least at this visioning stage). 

    This would help raise awareness of her accomplishment.  As VP Biden might say, “This is a big deal”.  As President Obama said to Sen John McCain a while ago – “I won”.  Elizabeth Warren won.  Let’s celebrate her accomplishment. 

    I think Ricochet can indeed make a difference here.  As I said, it’s “raising awareness”.

  10. R. Craigen

    Wow, a piece of subversion too interesting to ignore.  I think you’re onto something.  Remember when the Cherokee spokesmen wanted to speak with her about her claims and she refused to meet with them?   This should be interesting.

    Along similar lines, back in 2008 Steyn pointed out that, regardless of his strictly racial bloodlines Obama’s ethnic heritage, as evidenced by the names of his great-great-grandparents, show that he is 50% Euro-Caucasian, 43.75% Arab (african) and 6.25% Black (african).  According to the legal definition of ethnicity in most states he would qualify as being ethnically White or ethnically Arab, but not ethnically Black.  Not being a scholar of such things I wonder if someone who has such expertise has done a complete vetting of Steyn’s claims.  I find them credible, but I haven’t seen them pursued.  If the Warren thing produces interesting results maybe we should recommend BHO for a new appropriate designation based on his ancestry.

  11. Cunctator

    R. Craigen, a very interesting point.  I believe we can make a difference by reaching across the aisles, and showing we are full of positive goodwill.  A plaque sponsored by members at Ricochet.com may do this.  This initiative is not emanating from bitterness, I’m just surprised that this accomplishment has not been mentioned lately, so, like, this is advocacy, you know.

  12. Cunctator

    OK, my next comment – if people commit to a $25 donation towards a plaque for Elizabeth Warren, I will match their donation up to $5,000. Contingent that it’s placed in a prominent location at Harvard Law School. In recognition of her accomplishment.

  13. KC Mulville
    Erik Larsen: OK, my next comment – if people commit to a $25 donation towards a plaque for Elizabeth Warren, I will match their donation up to $5,000. Contingent that it’s placed in a prominent location at Harvard Law School. In recognition of her accomplishment.

    The next bet is for how long it will stay there.

  14. Esau

    It’s a great goof.

  15. David Carroll

    I want to teach law at Harvard.  I ‘m pretty sure I am 1/32 something.

  16. Jude

    I’m in for $25. Can Blue Yeti work out the payment scheme? I want this plaque to go somewhere that it won’t be taken down 10 minutes after it is put up. Oh, and perhaps it would do well to coincide w/ the swearing in of the next Congress.

  17. The Mugwump

    Erik, you have forgotten that leftists don’t have a sense of humor.  It’s not wise to mock your new masters.  It makes them twitchy. 

  18. Crow

    I’m 1/32 proud.

  19. tabula rasa
    ~Paules: Erik, you have forgotten that leftists don’t have a sense of humor.  It’s not wise to mock your new masters.  It makes them twitchy.  · 20 minutes ago

    And when they get twitchy they write regs like the HHS Mandate.

    By the way, we did have a real native-American senator for two  terms:  Colorado’s Ben Nighthorse Campbell (you remember he began as a Democrat, then became a Republican). Instead of creating a false family history, he did things like serve in Korea during the Korean war. Perhaps Liz Warren can now create a virtual military career.

  20. Mantis9

    I know this a satirical thread, but I have some factual points about Senator Warren’s alleged Cherokee heritage. 

    My wife is Cherokee and my mother-in-law is an office holder in the small, but official, Oregon chapter of the Cherokee nation, so I have a working, though imperfect, knowledge of Cherokee politics and identity. 

    Being declared Cherokee is a bit tricky. You literally have to be “card carrying”. Your blood relation is established through your mother. If your dad is a full-blooded Cherokee, but your mom is white as driven snow or even Apache–sorry–your not Cherokee.  Also, you’re not Cherokee if you can’t trace you lineage back through your mother to the “Rolls”, which (and I’m not completely clear on this) is an official record of tribal peoples by the government when they were marched from Florida to Oklahoma. So, if your ancestor ran off to the hills in rebellion to the mass deportation and their name wasn’t recorded, you’re not Cherokee. 

    My children are eligible for tribal membership, but I’m not Cherokee,  so my grandchildren will not be.

    Identity politics should require Warren to know her identities first.

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