How to Completely and Totally Exhaust Yourself

Read this. The imagine trying to comply with it, especially given the fact that the TSA keeps changing its security routines and procedures, as Stewart Baker points out.

There are better ways to ensure airport security. Too bad the TSA insists on eschewing innovation.

  1. Pejman Yousefzadeh
    C

    Well said.

    Eeyore

    Pejman Yousefzadeh: 

    Too bad the TSA insists on eschewing innovation.

    Innovation? The Israelis have been keeping terrorists off planes for decades. That might better read “Too bad the TSA insists on being the unionized PC effluent of a Jabba-the-Hut-sized enforcement bureaucracy…” · 2 hours ago

  2. Arahant
    Pejman Yousefzadeh: Too bad the TSA insists on eschewing innovation.

    Too bad the terrorists don’t.

  3. Blame The Innocent

    I had a bad feeling when W’s response to 9/11 was another federal bureaucracy.

  4. PJS

    TSA is all  my teenaged daughter remembers.  She has the process of airline security down.  It’s really too bad.

    I was recently approved for Global Entry, the quick immigration machines.  It also makes me eligible for TSA Pre-check, but I have heard that one only gets sent through that line occasionally.  I’ll let you know how it goes.  At TSA Pre-check you get to keep your shoes and light jacket on!  And you don’t have to take your computer out of the bag!  Wowee!

  5. Ajax von Kaiserpenguin

    Ought to be titled “How to Behave Like a Good Little Citizen”.

  6. Nick Stuart

    I like the “chitchat with the screeners” bit.

    Does anybody think we will ever be able to get rid of this nonsense?

  7. Amy Schley

    I never flew pre-9/11. In fact, my first plane trip was by myself from KC’s very small airport to O’Hare to Heathrow — talk about a culture shock! 

    But what made me absolutely nuts were the people who had stood in line for 15+ minutes, but somehow hadn’t figured out that at the end of the line, one would have to take off one’s shoes and belt.  Really, guys … how many times do you have to be told to do something before you do it?

  8. Charleen Larson
    Nick Stuart: I like the “chitchat with the screeners” bit.

    Does anybody think we will ever be able to get rid of this nonsense? · 1 hour ago

    No.  Because it’s keeping the elephants away.

  9. Eeyore
    Pejman Yousefzadeh: 

    Too bad the TSA insists on eschewing innovation.

    Innovation? The Israelis have been keeping terrorists off planes for decades. That might better read “Too bad the TSA insists on being the unionized PC effluent of a Jabba-the-Hut-sized enforcement bureaucracy…”

  10. Devereaux

    I have an intense dislike for pretty much everything TSA. And I get the opportunity to experience that displeasure about 4-6 times per month, as I travel here about.

    I never “chit-chat” with the TSA personnel – they are the enemy. They are every bit as bad as the terrorists. Losing my freedom is essentially a victory FOR the terrorists – it just isn’t their particular tyranny being imposed. But tyranny it is. Accepting one tyranny for another hardly seems a good deal.

    I have never understood why after 10+ years of this nonsense we are still willing to accept such abuse. NONE of this has anything to do with stopping a real live terrorist. Meanwhile TSA goes ballistic with any hint of my ability to actually defend myself against REAL terrorists. TSA reasoning is no different than the silly Leftist arguments  about not being allowed to carry. And in all its history, it has never caught a real terrorist! Even when they knew (Faisal Shahzad – NYC) they missed him! Took the NYPD to figure out he was on one of the planes and stop it.

    It is time to eliminate the TSA and start looking for real terrorists.

  11. iWc

    I just flew BWI-LHR, and there was a sign that said

    ALL

    C-PAPS

    Laptops

    Game Machines

    Must be removed from their bag for inspection

    hm. I had never heard of a C-PAP. So I asked the TSA lady, who stands facing that sign 8 hours a day or so, what it was. She loudly told me that I only needed to remove my laptop.

    So I asked: “OK. I am fine with that. But I am really curious: what is a C-PAP?”

    There was nobody behind me. So she looked behind me and pretended I did not exist. Admitting to ignorance, I guess, was worse than silence.

    Can you imagine the lack of curiosity required to stand facing a sign all day, look at IDs and call out “remember to remove your laptop”, and not even wonder what the sign means?!?!

    G-d help us.

    And then, when I arrived, I googled C-PAP. Turns out it is a respiratory ventilator commonly used for sleep apnea. Good to know!

  12. Robert E. Lee
    iWc: I just flew BWI-LHR, and there was a sign that said

    ALL

    C-PAPS

    Laptops

    Game Machines

    Must be removed from their bag for inspection

    And their inspection would conclude: Yup, that’s a laptop or a game machine or a C-PAP, two items of interest and something not worth stealing.

  13. Dave

    A few thoughts on why the TSA will continue:

    1.  Millions of people don’t fly. Probably a majority don’t. A quick google search only revealed stats on total flights, not individuals who flew. So for millions of people, TSA complaints don’t make any sense.

    2. A related point: millions of people fly only a couple of times per year, often for vacation. They are happy to be flying and so a few more minutes isn’t such a big deal.

    3. If another attack on a plane happens, the government wants to be able to say they tried everything to stop it, which to many people means a big show of force and a visible program.

    Imagine you’re the president who has to say, yes we used to do these screenings but too many people complained about the hassle so we stopped and a terrorist got through. It doesn’t matter if there are huge leaps in causation.

  14. Dave

    A couple more thoughts:

    1. I don’t think you really need to put your liquids in one little baggie separated from the rest of your luggage. I never do and have yet to be stopped. I do, however, carry only the small bottles. (Hope I’m not giving away any secrets!)

    2. The Chertoff article forgot to mention the part of the process where you keep a close eye on your stuff to make sure no one steals anything! I can live with the delays and the pat downs, but what I find intolerable is that one of the TSA guys would steal from me–or would be too distracted to notice if a fellow passenger stole something.

    3. The other thing that bothers me about TSA is that, typical of a bureaucracy, they are not allowed to exercise much independent judgment–and that’s how we get horror stories about sick old ladies being stripped searched.

    4. I fly out of Orlando a lot, which means lots of families moving slowly and many international travelers not totally grasping this strange American custom. What I’ve learned: be patient!

  15. Jude

    And if I’m honest with myself, the rituals of the screening line aren’t really about speed.  They’re about performance.  Stewart Baker

    Baker is right, and what Chertoff described is similar to the Walter Mitty attitude that men take toward otherwise onerous processes. I mean, how many women know that self checkout is a competitive sport? Not many I imagine. But just look at half the guys doing self checkout at the grocery store. We’re in it to win dang it.

Want to comment on stories like these? Become a member today!

You'll have access to:

  • All Ricochet articles, posts and podcasts.
  • The conversation amongst our members.
  • The opportunity share your Ricochet experiences.

Join Today!

Already a Member? Sign In