How Old Are You?

I went to Greg Gutfeld’s Fort Lauderdale book signing for his latest book – The Joy of Hate

Greg, IMHO, is the Right’s Jon Stewart. He is funny and witty. I’ve shared some of his ideas (the gay bar next to the 9/11 mosque) with the staunchest of liberals, and they agree with him. He has crossover appeal. However, his show is at 3:00 a.m. and the other one (The Five), IMO, sucks.

So, when I…

  1. Barkha Herman

    And a follow up question to the overlords of Ricochet – how do you attract the younger crowd?  Surely if they can afford smart phones, they can pay for Ricochet?

  2. Schrodinger

    As an OF, I fear the young, with rare exceptions, are too busy tweeting inanities and that their attention span is too short to engage in any serious thinking, much less putting their serious thoughts in writing. It’s much easier to write short TMs or tweets about their inane thoughts, like what they ate for lunch.

    Another legacy of the failure of our educational system.

  3. Barkha Herman
    Schrodinger’s Cat: As an OF, I fear the young, with rare exceptions, are too busy tweeting inanities and that their attention span is too short to engage in any serious thinking, much less putting their serious thoughts in writing. It’s much easier to write short TMs or tweets about their inane thoughts, like what they ate for lunch.

    Another legacy of the failure of our educational system. · 0 minutes ago

    And yet, every time I bring up the need to engage in the education system, I get no rise out of this crowd….

    A couple things – your moniker is very youthful.  I am thinking that your affiliation to quantum physics did not start when you were over 40.  Assuming I am correct, perhaps the young are not as useless / stupids after all. 

    Second – The youth block votes, and they have strong opinions on many things.  Perhaps it’s because I am a mother, I refuse to give up on the young.  And if education is to blame, then we are to blame for not educating them “right”.

  4. Robert Lux

    My beginnings of political awareness trace to my seventh year; I’m 42 now. It was then that my father — a lifelong Democrat (until recently) and a former professor at University of Michigan Law School — schooled me on the nefariousness of the feminist Equal Rights Amendment. He furthermore helped me to the realization that Jimmy Carter was a complete dip [-expletive].  The rest is history.     

  5. Schrodinger
    Barkha Herman

     

    A couple things – your moniker is very youthful.  I am thinking that your affiliation to quantum physics did not start when you were over 40.  Assuming I am correct, perhaps the young are not as useless / stupids after all. 

    Second – The youth block votes, and they have strong opinions on many things.  Perhaps it’s because I am a mother, I refuse to give up on the young.  And if education is to blame, then we are to blame for not educating them “right”. · 5 minutes ago

    Edited 4 minutes ago

    Actually, I am well over 40 and my interest in quantum mechanics is only a few years old. Of course, in my mind I am always 30.

    I am not giving up on the young. But, we are facing very strong headwinds. The young are by nature progressive, and, until conservative ideas are seen as progressive, we will not have their support.

    As to education, I think trying to change the existing system is beyond us. We need an alternative to public education run with conservative principles. I would advocate abolishing all public schools.

  6. Barkha Herman

    @Schrodinger’s Cat  Assuming you are right leaning, at what age did you become that (you don’t have to tell me how old you are now).

    As I mentioned, I became a libertarian at 16.  I was never a “progressive”.  I know of many others.  As a parent of two teenage kids, I meet my fair share of the young, some very intelligent and others of various interest and seriousness.  

    My kids are conservative, and have been most of their lives – even though the little Christian school I send them to turned squarely against Christianity due to the hypocrisies of the Christians in charge.

    I did not force my belief system on to them.  Conservatism appealed to me, and my kids intellectually at an early age.  So, it can be done.

    Why isn’t it, then?  Why does it not appeal to the young masses?  

  7. raycon and lindacon

    I’m just turning 70.  Can’t help that.  I watched the 1952 Republican convention.  I was 9 years old and very politically aware.  I began delivering a weekly newspaper that same year, although I had been reading the newspapers since I was about 6.  I’m simply politically aware.  My parents weren’t particularly engaged.  Dad was a Democrat union guy, and mom always seemed Republican.

    To your question; Young people aren’t particularly conservative because they, as with the majority of young people, are products of the zeitgeist.  Most follow the direction of their peers, and a much lower number either rebel against it, and even fewer maintain their individuality and decide who they are.

    The zeitgeist within Western civilization is of exhaustion and self indulgence.  If you will, it is the Democrat party platform and apparatus.  Young people are a product of this culture. 

    America began at a time when the zeitgeist was conservative and believed in the Creator God.  People weren’t necessarily very religious, but did share a common world view which is called Western Judo-Christianity.  Americans shared a common goal; greatness. Read Deuteronomy 30:19.  Choose Life!

    What is the common view now? 

  8. Schrodinger
    Barkha Herman: @Schrodinger’s Cat  Assuming you are right leaning, at what age did you become that (you don’t have to tell me how old you are now).

    I have always been a conservative, mainly because my father and mother were conservatives and I grew up in a affluent conservative community. In 1964, the school I was in had a straw poll on the election and Goldwater won by 2 to 1. So, I guess my conservatism runs in the blood.

    I will say that until recently I was a fiscal and foreign policy hawk conservative. Social issues were not a great concern. As a recent convert to Catholicism, the social issues have become a preeminent concern for me.

  9. M. T. S.

    I found that I’m somewhere between conservative/libertarian when I was 15. I’m now 27. I grew up in northern VA, so it seemed like everyone else was liberal. My dad was not very political, but he definitely was a Republican. For the most part I read a lot on my own to discover conservatism. I definitely didn’t learn it in public school (they actively tried to get us to dislike the Republican party) – but I am starting to think the only way to move the country in the direction we want is to get involved in education.

  10. Barkha Herman

    @raycon and lindacon - The funny thing is, both my kids, who went to a local Christian school are staunch anti abortion (my son even in the case of rape and incest).  But they are not Christians.  The Christian school managed to teach them the value of human life, but couldn’t convince them that gays don’t have a right to marry.

    This tells me that positive messaging will work (don’t kill an unborn child) where as negative messaging won’t (I have the right to marry but you don’t).

    The bottom line is that they understand personal responsibility – Christian schools are good at teaching that, where as in public school (they attended for 1 year), the message was always to find a scapegoat.

  11. Barkha Herman
    M. T. S.: I found that I’m somewhere between conservative/libertarian when I was 15. I’m now 27. 

    What led you to that realization?  Did you have other young friends who thought the same?  

  12. Jojo

    I am 54 and though of a basically conservative disposition due to my parents’ influence, did not pay much attention to politics till at least my early 40s.  Being a mother of teenage children, in conjunction with alarms sounded by my older and wiser sister, attuned me to the dangers of degeneration of the general culture.  Some run ins with lawyers in the 90s and early 2000s convinced me that the court system had been hijacked by looters using the cloak of “justice” to camouflage theft. But with TARP in 2008 and every minute since, I have suspected that the whole country has been similarly hijacked.

    In other words, it took a lot of life experience to make me pay attention.  When I was thirty I was only thinking about getting through the day- job, kid, house- and only knew what I heard from mainstream sources.

  13. Barkha Herman

    Jojo - how about your kids?  Are they conservative?  Do they know / understand / follow politics?  Are they likely to influence other kids in their age group?

    When I was younger, I didn’t know any other libertarians, and so I kept my political thought to myself, unless it came up.  I defended my positions always, and eloquently imho, however I was dismayed that in the US, so few had read / understood their own founding principles.

    As I get older, though, I want to engage more younger people.  An activist I am not, but I would have liked to have known older women like myself when I was younger.

  14. Mark

    I am 61.  I grew up as a liberal Democrat and cast my first two votes for McGovern and Carter.  Though I voted for Reagan in 80 I still voted predominantly D for other offices until the mid-90s.  Though most of my core beliefs have remained the same over that time, my ideas about how best to accomplish them have changed.

    I grew up in a liberal D atmosphere and it takes a lot to change that.  I think it is even harder today as the culture makes it much more difficult than it was in the 70s and 80s.  The media and the Ds have very successfully associated any non-progressive viewpoints with bigotry, hatred and small-mindedness which allows people to avoid even listening to what you are saying.  It is particularly difficult for young people to deal with.  Ironically, it means they don’t like nonconformists!  Kind of the flip side from when I was growing up in the 60s.

  15. Sabrdance

    I was probably born conservative, but I didn’t think about it until I was 8.  I saw Ross Perot’s infomercial on balancing the budget and America’s trade deficit, and I thought that sounded reasonable.  I am also a child of the Cold War -probably among the youngest who can claim that -I apparently scared my 3rd-6th grade teachers because my creative writing often dwelt on what it was like no longer having a Soviet Union, and what the Gulf War, Somalia, and Serbia foretold.  When I was 5 or 6 my church was smuggling translated Bibles into Belarus, and to this day I consider Belarus’s government (and Cuba’s for that matter) an affront to God, and there is a special circle in Hell reserved for Lushenko.

    I say I signed onto the “Leave me alone” coalition, but my time thinking of myself as a libertarian was limited -ultimately, I was not willing to give up the foreign engagements, nor to surrender the social issues, because I don’t expect the government to honor any space for Christians to live as they please, and anyway, what good is freedom in Babylon?  I’m 28.

  16. Sabrdance

    As for the next generation, I’m a professor of government at a comprehensive state school, but I refuse to turn my class into Conservative Propaganda to offest Liberal Propaganda.  I figure striving to teach accurately and truthfully, and to be able to address both sides of a political debate is subversive enough.  I’m not doing my students who decry progressive taxation as Socialism a favor if I just say “good job” and move on.  They’ve got to understand why, say, progressive taxes are used, and why they are popular, and why we don’t just switch to a flat tax (just to use an example from last week’s class on Fiscal Policy) and why switching to a flat tax does not magically solve all problems.

  17. Guruforhire

    He’s on fox.  Nobody cool listens to fox.  Fox will always be the other, the place for conservative no-nothings to get their scoop of daily propaganda by malicious and hateful people.

    Its been culturally marginalized.

    I am 32

  18. Steven Jones

    I just turned 50. My political awareness began during Watergate, but were heavily influenced by the Carter years (Carter was widely mocked by my peers). I can remember being swayed by progressive arguments as a young teen, but by Junior and Senior year, I was fully conservative.

    I can’t name any particular event or trend which influenced my decisions; rather, I have always been of a rational mindset, and conservative principles are inherently rational. Liberalism/Progressivism, on the other hand, tend to be buffeted by the winds of emotion. “Tax the rich”, “War against women”, etc. are all emotional appeals.

  19. Barkha Herman
    Sabrdance: As for the next generation, I’m a professor of government at a comprehensive state school, but I refuse to turn my class into Conservative Propaganda to offest Liberal Propaganda.  I figure striving to teach accurately and truthfully, and to be able to address both sides of a political debate is subversive enough.  I’m not doing my students who decry progressive taxation as Socialism a favor if I just say “good job” and move on.  They’ve got to understand why, say, progressive taxes are used, and why they are popular, and why we don’t just switch to a flat tax (just to use an example from last week’s class on Fiscal Policy) and why switching to a flat tax does not magically solve all problems. · 6 minutes ago

    That is commendable, indeed.

  20. Gus Marvinson

    I’m 48 and became politically aware (and conservative) when I was 26. The reason? I became a Christian, and as such took seriously the apostle Peter’s admonition to be “sober minded” (1 Peter 1:13). Actions have consequences and those consequences often effect others besides oneself. As a Christian serious about learning and deepening my faith, conservatism seemed natural–inescapable, really–to me.  In fact, I find the persistent progressivism of many Christians baffling.

    Before I turned to Christ I was utterly useless. Not a liberal in any meaningful, knowledgeable way, just apathetic and mired in short term self-interest.

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