Four in Ten Families Have Breadwinner Moms

Mostly that’s because of  single moms. But there’s also a growing trend of wives earning more than husbands. From Pew:

A record 40% of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income for the family, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The share was just 11% in 1960.

These “…

  1. Mollie Hemingway
    C

    Did anyone else think of this commercial?

  2. Yeah...ok.

    Wow! We only have 34 million families with children under 18?!

    Those kids better get started working now, that doesn’t seem like enough to support my social security.

    I wonder how many of those single mom “breadwinners” win all their bread from Uncle Sam?

  3. D.C. McAllister
    C
    Yeah…ok. 

    I don’t know about breadwinners specifically, but this is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics: 

    In 1964, about 19 million of the nation’s nonfarm employees were women; the three industries that employed the most women—manufacturing; trade, transportation, and utilities; and local government—accounted for 54 percent of these women. By 2010, nearly 65 million women had jobs, and 53 percent of these women worked in the three industries that employed the most women: education and health services; trade, transportation, and utilities; and local government. During this period, the growth of the education and health industry, and the number of women employed in it, has been notable.

    In the 1960s, more women were employed in manufacturing than in any other industry. During the 1970s, and 80s, more women were employed in trade, transportation, and utilities than any other industry. Until 1975, there were more women employed in local government than in education and health services. In 1976, employment of women in education and health exceeded that in local government. From 1993 to 2010, education and health services has ranked first in employment of women, followed by trade, transportation and utilities, and local government.

  4. Ryan M

    My wife makes 2K more than I do…  and she gets benefits (I get nothing above base salary).  I consider that more a function of demand than anything else, but it is a little depressing when I consider how much her education cost compared to mine!  Of course, that “function of demand” is an interesting question…  I’m a defense attorney; without even saying what our city pays the prosecutors, I will only say that it pays their secretaries nearly 125% of what I get… plus benefits.  That is interesting not because of what it says about fairness, but what it says about the things society values.  When it comes to women in the workplace, can we finally stop with the claim that women make 40% less than men?  I can name quite a few of my female colleagues whose salary I would gladly take with a 40% raise…  Those secretaries, for instance.

  5. robberberen

    My wife makes significantly more than I do.  I stacked up education and school loan debt while she was out there laying a professional foundation for a nice income.  She works in PR for a major corporation (from home!), while I work as a felony prosecutor in a relatively small Texas town. 

    We’ve been able to maintain traditional roles without too much stress or resentment for basically two reasons:

    1) We both accept the biblical view of marriage — that we are one.  There’s no such thing as “her income” or “my income”.  Everything is ours.  And she knows that I would spend and save exactly the same way if I were the primary breadwinner.

    2)  I don’t lay around all day.  I work hard at a job that carries some prestige, despite the limited income.  She sees my work and respects it (as I respect hers, and the financial stability it brings).  And when we’re not working we maintain traditional roles.  She changes most of the diapers, I do the home repairs, etc.

    If either of these were different, things would be much harder.

  6. Fake John Galt

    So with all the help the culture has given women in the last 50 years. 60% of women are still not performing up to expectations. Sad.

  7. The King Prawn

    Where do I sign up for this gravy train?

  8. robberberen

    Isn’t it obvious that this trend toward two-income families among the well-educated is driving any increase in income disparity in the U.S.?

    The true legacy of feminism will be a wider gap between the “haves” and “have-nots”.  How unexpected that a movement aimed at equality would create more inequality.  Shocking. 

    But feminists don’t need to worry.  Increasing inequality will still be seen as the fault of conservatives who don’t care enough about poor people.

  9. captainpower
    Fake John Galt: So with all the help the culture has given women in the last 50 years. 60% of women are still not performing up to expectations. Sad. · 1 hour ago

    So 50 years of pervasive feminist ideology has still not been able to obliterate all traces of common sense?

    Sounds like a good thing to me.

  10. Jeff

    It’s cause for alarm. Real wages for men have precipitously declined.

    [...] the real earnings of the median male have actually declined by 19 percent since 1970. This means that the median man in 2010 earned as much as the median man did in 1964 — nearly a half century ago. Men with less education face an even bleaker picture; earnings for the median man with a high school diploma and no further schooling fell by 41 percent from 1970 to 2010.

    At the same time, real wages for women have fallen by only 6%. The underlying problem is declining real wages for everyone.

    Why are men hardest hit? On average, men are more productive than women, work more, are absent less. They ought to be more secure.

    Women are a protected group at at law. Men aren’t. Every man you hire increase regulatory risk by tilting the gender balance towards men. Every man you fire reduced regulatory risk by tilting the gender balance towards women. Every woman you hire reduces your regulatory risk. Every woman you fire drastically increases regulatory risk.

    Any wonder that millions of men decide to stop playing a game rigged against them.

  11. Duane Oyen
    Blake: My wife makes significantly more than I do. ………

    We’ve been able to maintain traditional roles without too much stress or resentment for basically two reasons:

    1) We both accept the biblical view of marriage — that we are one.  There’s no such thing as “her income” or “my income”.  Everything is ours………

    2)  I don’t lay around all day.  I work hardat a job ………

    Edited 7 hours ago

    Same here.  My wife’s bonuses leave me in the dust.  But that started only after we’d been married well over 25 years. 

    And we are both gainfully employed professionals.  She is a lot prettier, maybe that’s it…..

  12. jarhead
    C

    Single mamas are a big enough problem, but single breadwinning mamas are a huge problem, because of children and teenagers coming home without an adult presence there and having no guidance, no one to talk to, no one to make them do homework, and no one to keep them out of trouble.  Divorce and the lack of a father or father figure available has killed families, with all kinds of negative cultural repercussions.  A few families survive with a single breadwinning mama, like Dr Ben Carson, and all the kudos to them, but for every survivor, it seems like there are hundreds of lost kids.

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