nutroll.jpg

Best City or State Specific Foods

I had some family in town from Pittsburgh.  They brought me nutroll, for which that city is known. 

 My wife is from Columbus, OH and she introduced me to Cincinnati chili which is now a staple in our house. 

cincy-chili.jpgMy own family is from Chicago, so when I go back I make sure to pa…

  1. Tom Lindholtz

    California cuisine is very diverse, as Diane has said. What I most often cook — outdoor kitchen with grill — is Tri-Tip, Planked Salmon, steaks, chops. A family favorite is grilled SPAM sliders. My wife does tacos and taco salad, an amazing chili relleno casserole, chicken wings that are a party favorite. The list goes on, but I don’t go hungry,

  2. Aaron Miller

    Fajitas! A great Tex-Mex tradition. You haven’t lived until you’ve tried the ones at Pappasito’s.

    Steaks are another Texas specialty. Sadly, I can’t cook much besides meat. But here’s one Texan’s T-bone marinade recipe: red wine, Worcestershire, Tabasco, black pepper, lemon pepper, garlic salt, and brown sugar. Enjoy!

  3. flownover

    Northwest Missouri

    tenderloin.jpg

    pork tenderloin

  4. tabula rasa

     After Chopin and Pope John Paul II, a Polish sausage is Poland’s greatest export.  And the folks in Chicago made it perfect.

  5. Kelly B

    Southern New Mexico (south of Albuquerque; can be found north of there, too, but Las Cruces does it really well!) – Pork Green Chile.  I wish I could claim it for Colorado, but at least I know where to get it around here.

  6. Edward Dentzel

    I’m originally from the Pittsburgh area and I love me some nutroll. When it comes to Pittsburgh food you can’t forget perogies and Primanti Bros. sandwiches as well. 

  7. tabula rasa

    Utah (my home):  Green Jello

    New Orleans:  Beignets 

  8. Flagg Taylor
    flownover: Northwest Missouri

    pork tenderloin · Dec 30 at 1:03pm

    That looks darn good.  MO is known for this?

  9. Flagg Taylor
    Aaron Miller: Fajitas! A great Tex-Mex tradition. You haven’t lived until you’ve tried the ones at Pappasito’s.

    Steaks are another Texas specialty. Sadly, I can’t cook much besides meat. But here’s one Texan’s T-bone marinade recipe: red wine, Worcestershire, Tabasco, black pepper, lemon pepper, garlic salt, and brown sugar. Enjoy! · Dec 30 at 12:52pm

    I’ve been to a Pappasito’s in Atlanta and enjoyed the fajitos–will try that marinade.

  10. flownover
    Flagg Taylor

    flownover: Northwest Missouri

    pork tenderloin · Dec 30 at 1:03pm

    That looks darn good.  MO is known for this? · Dec 30 at 1:39pm

    I don’t think pork tenderloins are a national thing. Sort of like five point Pitch. Brain sandwiches . What do you think ?

  11. Glenn the Iconoclast
    Drew Hankins:

    Oh, and there is always the mysterious scrapple…… 

    My favorite scrapple recipe begins: “Divide a hog’s head in half…”

  12. Glenn the Iconoclast
    Peter Christofferson

    Is there anywhere outside of the Chicago area (also my neck of the woods) where you can get a decent Italian beef sandwich? I sure haven’t found anyplace yet. 

    Try The Flying Wienie in Cedar Rapids.  (Don’t let the fact that it’s a converted two-bay Mobil gas station put you off.)

  13. Glenn the Iconoclast
    flownover: Northwest Missouri

    pork tenderloin

    Midtown Family Restaurant in Iowa City has one that’s slightly larger, lapping over both sides of the plate.  Joensy’s has a good reputation, but I found it slightly inferior (granted that even a so-so tenderloin is great).

  14. Diane Ellis
    C

    We grow lots of stuff here in California.  Strawberries, artichokes, almonds, avocados, apples, oranges, garlic, grapes, and “Californian cuisine” aims to make good use of locally grown and in season produce. When I was a kid, my family would go to all of the local harvest type festivals – Gilroy’s “Garlic Festival” where we’d have garlic ice cream and Castroville’s “Artichoke Festival” where my favorite dish was fried artichoke hearts and Watsonville’s “Strawberry Festival” where you could get funnel cake with a mountain of fresh strawberries.  You can get great seafood all along the coast.  And fusion cuisines (e.g. Asian fusion or Mediterranean fusion) are big here. Here in San Francisco, we’re known for our pretty delicious sourdough bread.  And I’ll be going up to Napa tomorrow, where I’ll be imbibing some of the world’s most delicious wine.

  15. Glenn the Iconoclast
    Albert Arthur: MOXIE! It makes Mainers Mighty.

    Moxie?!  I thought it was defunct.  I haven’t seen that since the early 60′s, when Pepsi started pushing it aside as a national brand.  (Haven’t seen Rondo or Nehi recently either, as far as that goes.)

  16. Aaron Miller

    If you’re in Louisiana, try the boudin. You can pick up some good boudin at Don’s, just off I-10 near Lafayette.

    Diane, how do Californians cook their seafood? And what sort of fish do y’all normally eat? I’m a big fan of stuffed flounder.

  17. flownover
    Diane Ellis, Ed.:  And I’ll be going up to Napa tomorrow, where I’ll be imbibing some of the world’s most delicious wine. · Dec 30 at 2:28pm

    I’d say the tasting menu at the French Laundry, but you should have Peter call in case you forgot to get reservations. Heck for $270 a pop, the wine will be a bargain. Screaming Eagle anyone ?

  18. thelonious
    tabula rasa: Utah (my home):  Green Jello

    New Orleans:  Beignets  · Dec 30 at 1:24pm

    Edited on Dec 30 at 01:26 pm

    Being a Utahn, my mother always gives out of state guests salt water taffy.  Fry sauce was also invented in Utah.

  19. Glenn the Iconoclast

    As long as I’m running off at the chin:

    Adana, Turkey: Adanakebobs (of course)

    Bitburg, Germany: Bitburger Pils (considered sub-standard by the locals, but I like it) and landjaegers

    Tampa: Fat Wilie’s Fish Camp’s shrimp

    Torrejon, Spain: Harry’s Pub’s clams oreganato and, don’t remember the name, but the octopus stew, pupo, I think

    Hawaii: okulehou (also Georgia, under the name ‘raw, unaged whiskey;’ both are ! )

  20. The King Prawn

    I’m smoking a brisket tomorrow. That’s real Texas cuisine.

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